Gender Identity Quotes

Quotes tagged as "gender-identity" (showing 1-30 of 58)
Michael Thomas Ford
“So now I'm thinking about it. I'm imagining sitting down with my parents and actually saying, "I'm gay." And you know what? It makes me a little mad. I mean, straight guys don't have to sit their parents down and tell them they like girls.”
Michael Thomas Ford, Suicide Notes

Virginia Woolf
“It is fatal to be a man or woman pure and simple; one must be woman-manly or man-womanly. ... Some marriage of opposites has to be consummated.”
Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own

Kate Bornstein
“It's easy to fictionalize an issue when you're not aware of the many ways in which you are privileged by it.”
Kate Bornstein, Gender Outlaws: The Next Generation

Betty Friedan
“It is not possible to preserve one's identity by adjusting for any length of time to a frame of reference that is in itself destructive to it. It is very hard indeed for a human being to sustain such an 'inner' split - conforming outwardly to one reality, while trying to maintain inwardly the value it denies.”
Betty Friedan, The Feminine Mystique

Abhijit Naskar
“Love has no gender - compassion has no religion - character has no race.”
Abhijit Naskar, Either Civilized or Phobic: A Treatise on Homosexuality

Jeff Garvin
“At some point during my research, I came across the term "gender fluid." Reading those words was a revelation. It was like someone tore a layer of gauze off the mirror, and I could see myself clearly for the first time. There was a name for what I was. It was a thing. Gender fluid.

Sitting there in front of my computer--like I am right now--I knew I would never be the same. I could never go back to seeing it the old way; I could never go back to not knowing what I was.

But did that glorious moment of revelation really change anything? I don't know. Sometimes, I don't think so. I may have a name for what I am now--but I'm just as confused and out of place as I was before. And if today is any indication, I'm still playing out that scene in the toy store--trying to pick the thing that will cause the least amount of drama. And not having much success.”
Jeff Garvin, Symptoms of Being Human

Nick Krieger
“I followed the trail out of the room, invigorated by the possibility of reinventing my own body. The meaning was mine, as long as I was with those who had the vision and vocabulary to understand my creation.”
Nick Krieger, Nina Here Nor There: My Journey Beyond Gender

Kathleen Winter
“Whenever she imagined her child, grown up without interference from a judgemental world, she imagined its male and female halves as complementing each other, and as being secretly, almost magically powerful.”
Kathleen Winter, Annabel

Richard Price
“Some day, my son, you are going to learn that the two greatest joys of being a man are beating the hell out of someone and getting the hell beaten out of you, good night.”
Richard Price, I Wanderers

Abhijit Naskar
“In the unification of two minds, orientation of sexuality is irrelevant.”
Abhijit Naskar, Either Civilized or Phobic: A Treatise on Homosexuality

Abhijit Naskar
“Either you are homophobic or you are a human - you cannot be both.”
Abhijit Naskar, Either Civilized or Phobic: A Treatise on Homosexuality

Abhijit Naskar
“Being homosexual is no more abnormal than being lefthanded.”
Abhijit Naskar, Either Civilized or Phobic: A Treatise on Homosexuality

Jeff Garvin
“The first thing you're going to want to know about me is: Am I a boy, or am I a girl?”
Jeff Garvin, Symptoms of Being Human

Abhijit Naskar
“Homosexuals are not made, they are born.”
Abhijit Naskar, Either Civilized or Phobic: A Treatise on Homosexuality

Hannah Gadsby
“I don’t identify as transgender. But I’m clearly gender not-normal. I don’t think even lesbian is the right identity for me. I really don’t. I might as well come out now. I identify as tired. I’m just tired.”
Hannah Gadsby

Abhijit Naskar
“Can you imagine, somebody telling you, your love for your dearly beloved is a sin! Can you imagine, somebody telling you, women are inferior to men, and are meant only serve the men! Can you imagine, somebody telling you, a man can have multiple wives, and yet be deemed civilized! Here that somebody is a fundamentalist ape - a theoretical pest from the stone-age, that somehow managed to survive even amidst all the rise of reasoning and intellect.”
Abhijit Naskar, Either Civilized or Phobic: A Treatise on Homosexuality

Abhijit Naskar
“Homosexuality is immutable, irreversible and nonpathological.”
Abhijit Naskar, Either Civilized or Phobic: A Treatise on Homosexuality

Lorin Morgan-Richards
“One day stores will no longer have gender classifications. Instead the consumer decides how and what they want, rather than the social engineering of corporations. The concept of gender will be extinct.”
Lorin Morgan-Richards

“Quickly I find another surprise. The boys are wilder writers — less careful of convention, more willing to leap into the new. I start watching the dozens of vaguely familiar girls, who seem to have shaved off all distinguishing characteristics. They are so careful. Careful about their appearance, what they say and how they say it, how they sit, what they write. Even in the five-minute free writes, they are less willing to go out from where they are — to go out there, where you have to go, to write. They are reluctant to show me rough work, imperfect work, anything I might criticize; they are very careful to write down my instructions word by word.

They’re all trying themselves on day by day, hour by hour, I know — already making choices that will last too unfairly long. I’m surprised to find, after a few days, how invigorating it all is. I pace and plead for reaction, for ideas, for words, and gradually we all relax a little and we make progress. The boys crouch in their too-small desks, giant feet sticking out, and the girls perch on the edge, alert like little groundhogs listening for the patter of coyote feet. I begin to like them a lot.

Then the outlines come in. I am startled at the preoccupation with romance and family in many of these imaginary futures. But the distinction between boys and girls is perfectly, painfully stereotypical. The boys also imagine adventure, crime, inventions, drama. One expects war with China, several get rich and lose it all, one invents a time warp, another resurrects Jesus, another is shot by a robber. Their outlines are heavy on action, light on response. A freshman: “I grow populerity and for the rest of my life I’m a million air.” [sic] A sophomore boy in his middle age: “Amazingly, my first attempt at movie-making won all the year’s Oscars. So did the next two. And my band was a HUGE success. It only followed that I run the country.”

Among the girls, in all the dozens and dozens of girls, the preoccupation with marriage and children is almost everything. They are entirely reaction, marked by caution. One after the other writes of falling in love, getting married, having children and giving up — giving up careers, travel, college, sports, private hopes, to save the marriage, take care of the children. The outlines seem to describe with remarkable precision the quietly desperate and disappointed lives many women live today.”
Sallie Tisdale, Violation: Collected Essays by Sallie Tisdale

“She follows her nose and stands once more before the doors of a quintessential dilemma. Male or Female. Here is her paradox. A staccato voice seems to challenge her, berate her. Hombre or Mujer. Mann or Frau. Homme or Femme. Gentleman or Lady. Com on, decide. She knows them all. She is them all. Not fluid or all-encompassing, gathering the harvest of the reaping fields, but fractured and split and bleeding. Her inner core weeping out of itself. There is nothing for hermaphrodites. It's too confusing. The words rattle around in her earbones, androgynous and humming. How can she choose? She cannot choose. To choose is to sunder.”
Mark O'Flynn, The Last Days of Ava Langdon

Abhijit Naskar
“Discriminations suit animals, not humans. And yet, the unfortunate reality is, it is the humans that discriminate each other on the grounds of imaginary labels, not the animals. This way, animals are more civilized than humans.”
Abhijit Naskar, Either Civilized or Phobic: A Treatise on Homosexuality

“Accepted social gender roles and expectations are so entrenched in our culture that most people cannot imagine any other way. As a result, individuals fitting neatly into these expectations rarely if ever question what gender really means. They have never had to, because the system has worked for them.”
Nicki Petrikowski, Critical Perspectives on Gender Identity

Patricia C. Wrede
“The last dragon was apparently still too young to have made up its mind which sex it wanted to be; it didn't have any horns at all.”
Patricia C. Wrede, Dealing with Dragons

“The Midwife talked to herself now, rather than God, as she walked the road past the Big Bog, wondering if a child born female could truly live her whole life as a male. And if this were possible and offended no god, then perhaps the world had no order other than what was arbitrarily imposed by humans.”
Kate Horsley, The Changeling

Neda Aria
“That’s the vicious truth doctor. For me and persons like me, we are experiencing a divorce from our own individual self by sensing our sensations, emotions, behaviors as not belonging to the same person or identity. That’s how you psychiatrists could explain it. That’s how society would like to codify its population. Such a ludicrous model we’ve been creating calling it civilization”
Neda Aria

Wesley Stace
“Even at such a tender age, I knew that life is lived in leftovers, account ledgers, and timetables rather than in the Platonic sphere of perfect theory. I couldn't float sylphlike around Love Hall in the flowing robes of indeterminacy for the rest of my life, however much I wished there to be no change. I had to accept my responsibilities and, at least in the eyes of the world and at least for the time being, nail my colors to a mast. Unless I wished to appear a strange wonder for the rest of time, caked in circus makeup covering the truth inches beneath, the mast would be male.”
Wesley Stace, Misfortune

Russell M. Nelson
“Latter-Day Saints proclaim that "marriage between a man and a woman is ordained of God and that the family is central to the Creator's plan for the eternal destiny of His children." We also know that "gender is an essential characteristic of individual premortal, mortal, and eternal identity and purpose." Marriage between a man and a woman is fundamental to the Lord's doctrine and crucial to God's eternal plan. Marriage between a man and a woman is God's pattern for a fullness of life on earth and in heaven. God's marriage pattern cannot be abused, misunderstood, or misconstrued.”
Russell M. Nelson, Accomplishing the Impossible: What God Does, What We Can Do

Shane Arbuthnott
“I guess that's more about me than about you, [...] I mean, me wanting you to have a name I can use. Wanting you to be he or she. You aren't those things, and you don't have to be.”
Shane Arbuthnott, Terra Nova

Abhijit Naskar
“Discriminations are never a sign of a civilized society. What makes us civilized is our act of liberated kindness with other people beyond the man-made primitive citadels of gender, race, religion and sexual orientation.”
Abhijit Naskar, Either Civilized or Phobic: A Treatise on Homosexuality

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