Automobiles Quotes

Quotes tagged as "automobiles" Showing 1-27 of 27
Roman Payne
“It’s not that we have to quit
this life one day, but it’s how
many things we have to quit
all at once: music, laughter,
the physics of falling leaves,
automobiles, holding hands,
the scent of rain, the concept
of subway trains... if only one
could leave this life slowly!”
Roman Payne, Rooftop Soliloquy

Steve Martin
“You can start by wiping that fucking dumb-ass smile off your rosey, fucking, cheeks! Then you can give me a fucking automobile... a fucking Datsun, a fucking Toyota, a fucking Mustang, a fucking Buick! Four fucking wheels and a seat! And I really don't care for the way your company left me in the middle of fucking nowhere with fucking keys to a fucking car that isn't fucking there. And I really didn't care to fucking walk down a fucking highway and across a fucking runway to get back here to have you smile at my fucking face. I want a fucking car RIGHT FUCKING NOW!”
Steve Martin

J.G. Ballard
“She had originally agreed to appear naked, but on seeing the cars informed me that she would only appear topless—an interesting logic was at work there.”
James Graham Ballard, The Atrocity Exhibition

Booth Tarkington
“I'm not sure he's wrong about automobiles," he said. "With all their speed forward they may be a step backward in civilization -- that is, in spiritual civilization. It may be that they will not add to the beauty of the world, nor to the life of men's souls.”
Booth Tarkington, The Magnificent Ambersons

Jeremy Clarkson
“[A Bugatti Veyron is] quite the most stunning piece of automotive engineering ever created....At a stroke then, the Veyron has rendered everything I’ve ever said about any other car obsolete. It’s rewritten the rule book, moved the goalposts and in the process, given Mother Nature a bloody nose.”
Jeremy Clarkson

Filippo Tommaso Marinetti
“We declare that the splendor of the world has been enriched by a new beauty: the beauty of speed. A racing automobile with its bonnet adorned with great tubes like serpents with explosive breath...a roaring motor car which seems to run on machine-gun fire, is more beautiful than the Victory of Samothrace.”
F. T. Marinetti

Michael D. O'Brien
“Automobiles are unreliable and dangerous slaves. They frequently revolt and kill their masters. I hate them.”
Michael D. O'Brien, The Island of the World

“We’re far from having too much horsepower…[m]y definition of too much horsepower is when all four wheels are spinning in every gear.”
Mark Donohue

John Steinbeck
“The little engine roared and then stopped. Adam sat back for a moment, limp but proud, before he got out.
The postmaster looked out between the bars of his golden grill. "I see you've got one of the damn things," he said.
"Have to keep up with the times," said Adam.
"I predict there'll come a time when you can't find a horse, Mr. Trask."
"Maybe so."
They'll change the face of the countryside. They get their clatter into everything," the postmaster went on.”
John Steinbeck, East of Eden

Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“Because he has finally realized that it is it and not him that is loved by the woman he loves, many a man is jealous of his own car, house, wardrobe, or salary.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana

“But what really matters is what's under the hood, and without continued attention to routine maintenance and repairs, it isn't long before the same old engine spoils the new ride.”
William Cope Moyers, Broken: My Story of Addiction and Redemption

“Lured by smooth roads onto a new turnpike, he read with surprise the rules he was handed, don't stop, don't turn around, pay when you get there; he made his escape at the first exit he saw, for fiftyfive cents, and now he was on the old road buzzing the staid turnpike by turns over and under, teasing it crazy.”
Douglas Woolf, Wall to Wall

William Faulkner
“People will pay any price for motion. They will even work for it. Look at bicycles.”
William Faulkner, The Reivers

Elizabeth Peters
“Though Emerson is a firm believer in the equality of the female sex, he has some secret reservations, and one of them involves the car. (There is something about these machines that makes men want to pound their chests and roar like gorillas. I speak figuratively, of course.)”
Elizabeth Peters, He Shall Thunder in the Sky

Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“Most people do not mind having a house that is smaller and/or a car that is cheaper than their neighbours’, as long as they each earn and have more money than their neighbours, and, equally important, their neighbours know that.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana

“The moon, almost full, shines high in the sky in front of me. I roll down the window and rest my arm on top of the door frame. The night air blowing in softly through the open window feels cool on my face. For the moment, all seems right with the world.”
Kevin James Shay, It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad Trip: On the Road of the Longest Two-Week Family Road Trip in History

Silvia Moreno-Garcia
“I don’t want to go back. Not for a thousand years, and yet…I don’t know what I’ll do if I’m not taking care of Grandfather and fetching the groceries. I’ve never seriously thought of it, and now it seems I should. Or maybe not, maybe it’s too soon. Maybe there’s no point in talking about automobiles when I don’t know if I’ll live to be nineteen. But it would be fun, wouldn’t it? To ride one. Maybe to ride it with you.”
Silvia Moreno-Garcia, Gods of Jade and Shadow

Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“A car is one of the most interesting inventions, but driving is one of the most boring activities.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana

Matthew McConaughey
“I've driving a Lincoln since long before anybody paid me to drive one.”
Matthew McConaughey

“That Detroit ultimately concentrated on automobiles could be traced to one genius, Henry Ford.... But that the necessary human energy for this development existed in Detroit could be proven through its early history.... I told him what I knew of the settlement in Detroit and of the climate, certainly almost the worst in the United States. Only the very strong could survive.... To defeat the conditions imposed by earth and sky at Detroit required intensive labor by energetic men who were not tempted by pleasure and play.”
William Valentiner

“Rivera’s admiration for Stalin was equaled only by his admiration for Henry Ford. By the 1920s and ‘30s, nearly every industrial country in Europe and Latin America, as well as the Soviet Union, had adopted Ford’s engineering and manufacturing methods: his highly efficient assembly line to increase production and reduce the cost of automobiles, so that the working class could at least afford to own a car; his total control over all the manufacturing and production processes by concentrating them all in one place, from the gathering of raw materials to orchestrating the final assembly; and his integration, training, and absolute control of the workforce. Kahn, the architect of Ford’s factories, subsequently constructed hundreds of factories on the model of the Rouge complex in Dearborn, Michigan, which was the epicenter of Ford’s industrial acumen as well as a world-wide symbol of future technology. Such achievements led Rivera to regard Detroit’s industry as the means of transforming the proletariat to take the reins of economic production.”
Linda Downs

Julian  May
“The Jeep windshield was doing its damnedest to stay clear, but the amount of water flowing over it threatened to overwhelm the ionizer.”
Julian May, Orion Arm

Jimmy Dore
“Why not give ME 50 billion dollars. I can go build a car plant and make cars. I can go employ people. Give me 50 billion dollars. You gotta go give it to people who already proved that they're failures?”
Jimmy Dore

Dmitry Dyatlov
“I met a girl named Shelby once or twice. For some reason, the image of a car sprung to mind. After some liquid courage, I asked her. How she would like to make my babies. She blocked me on that one social media network. I was expecting a business plan. See, her father tricked me. He made me believe I was dealing with a rational human being. But, hey, maybe we all learned something... didn't we?”
Dmitry Dyatlov

Matthew McConaughey
“I've drinking a Lincoln since long before anybody paid me to drive one.”
Matthew McConaughey

Albert Camus
“We are all exceptional cases. We all want to appeal against something! Each of us insists on being innocent at all cost, even if he has to accuse the whole human race and heaven itself. You won't delight a man by complimenting him on the efforts by which he has become intelligent or generous. On the other hand, he will beam if you admire his natural generosity. Inversely, if you tell a criminal that his crime is not due to his nature or his character but to unfortunate circumstances, he will be extravagantly grateful to you. During the counsel's speech, this is the moment he will choose to weep. Yet there is no credit in being honest or intelligent by birth. Just as one is surely no more responsible for being a criminal by nature than for being a criminal by circumstance. But those rascals want grace, that is irresponsibility, and they shamelessly allege the justifications of nature of the excuses of circumstances, even if they are contradictory. The essentially thing is that they should be innocent, that their virtues, by grace of birth, should not be questioned and that their misdeeds, born of a momentary misfortune, should never be more than provisional. As I told you, it's a matter of dodging judgement. Since it is hard to dodge it, tricky to get one's nature simultaneously admired and excused, they all strive to be rich. Why? Did you ever ask yourself? For power, of course. But especially because wealth shields from immediate judgement, takes you out of the subway crowd to enclose you in a chromium-plated automobile, isolates you in huge protected lawns, Pullmans, first-class cabins. Wealth, cher ami, is not quite acquittal, but reprieve, and that's always worth taking.”
Albert Camus, The Fall

Walter Tevis
“It changed the life of mankind more radically than the printing press. It created suburbs and a hundred other dependencies—sexual and economic and narcotic—upon the automobile. And the automobile paved the way for more profound – more inward- inner dependencies upon Television and then robots, and finally the ultimate and predictable conclusion of it all: the perfection of the chemistry of the mind…It all began, I suppose, with learning to build fires—to warm the cave and keep the predators out. And it ended with time-release Valium.”
Walter Tevis, Mockingbird