Into the Forest discussion

100 views
Reading Challenge > 2018 Challenge Progress

Comments Showing 1-50 of 96 (96 new)    post a comment »
« previous 1

message 1: by Jalilah (new)

Jalilah | 4286 comments Mod
This thread is to track your progress for the 2018 Challenge! https://www.goodreads.com/challenges/...

Into the Forest 2018 Challenge

1. A book by a modern author known for the the retelling genre ( De Lint,McKillip,Marillier,Jane Yolen,Robin McKinley etc)
2. One of Andrew Lang's Colored Fairy Books
3. A book involving teleportation or transportation to another world or fairy tale world
4. A retelling of a children's or adults literature classic
5. A book that has been nominated for the Mythopoeic Award
6.A nonfiction book about a famous fairy/folk tale or myth author or character.
7. A book that is a retelling inspired by or a collection of fairy/folk tales or myths from a non-European culture.
8. A book that is a retelling inspired by or a collection of original tales of of First Nations/Native American Folktales or Mythology
9. Read one additional book from a series you already started
10. A retelling, novel inspired by or original tale based on a classic European myth, fairy or folk tale for example Arthurian legends.
11. One collection of Essential Fairy Tales or Myths or novel or retellings based on an essential fairy tale or myth
12. A novel or short story anthology in translation


message 2: by Tamara (new)

Tamara Agha-Jaffar | 724 comments I plan to participate in this challenge. Is this where we list the books we plan to read for the challenge, or do we just list the books after we've read them? Is there a different thread for listing the books we plan to read?
Sorry to ask so many questions, but I've not done this before.


message 3: by Melanti (new)

Melanti | 2125 comments Mod
Tamara wrote: "I plan to participate in this challenge. Is this where we list the books we plan to read for the challenge, or do we just list the books after we've read them? Is there a different thread for listi..."

Both a running list of what you plan to read/have already finished and talking about what you've just finished (of course you can also use the Currently Reading thread for that if you like)


message 4: by Melanti (last edited Jul 10, 2018 09:33AM) (new)

Melanti | 2125 comments Mod
Here, I'll start us off...


1. A book by a modern author known for the the retelling genre - Tales of Wonder by Jane Yolen - 2/27
2. One of Andrew Lang's Colored Fairy Books
3. A book involving teleportation or transportation to another world or fairy tale world - The Unicorn Sonata by Peter S. Beagle - 2/22
4. A retelling of a children's or adults literature classic - Happy Birthday, Wanda June by Kurt Vonnegut (Odyssey)
5. A book that has been nominated for the Mythopoeic Award
6.A nonfiction book about a famous fairy/folk tale or myth author or character.
7. A book that is a retelling inspired by or a collection of fairy/folk tales or myths from a non-European culture - Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor - 1/31
8. A book that is a retelling inspired by or a collection of original tales of of First Nations/Native American Folktales or Mythology
9. Read one additional book from a series you already started The Girl Who Raced Fairyland All the Way Home by Catherynne M. Valente - In Progress
10. A retelling, novel inspired by or original tale based on a classic European myth, fairy or folk tale for example Arthurian legends. - Mythago Wood, The Buried Giant
11. One collection of Essential Fairy Tales or Myths or novel or retellings based on an essential fairy tale or myth - The Epic of Gilgamesh - 4/20
12. A novel or short story anthology in translation - Faust by Goethe - 4/14


message 5: by Asaria (last edited Jan 04, 2018 08:26AM) (new)

Asaria | 568 comments 1. A book by a modern author known for the the retelling genre ( De Lint,McKillip,Marillier,Jane Yolen,Robin McKinley etc)
Stepping from the Shadows by Patricia A. McKillip
Chalice by Robin McKinley (reread)
Or something by De Lint
2. One of Andrew Lang's Colored Fairy Books
The Red Fairy Book
3. A book involving teleportation or transportation to another world or fairy tale world
Witch World by Andre Norton (reread) . Didn't read in English, but I remain indecisive on language. While originals give nice medieval feel, Polish translations of her books are more fairy tale like in style.
4. A retelling of a children's or adults literature classic
5. A book that has been nominated for the Mythopoeic Award.
Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell Maybe I will manage to read it, at last.
6.A nonfiction book about a famous fairy/folk tale or myth author or character.
7. A book that is a retelling inspired by or a collection of fairy/folk tales or myths from a non-European culture.

8. A book that is a retelling inspired by or a collection of original tales of of First Nations/Native American Folktales or Mythology
Works of Joseph Bruchac. I can't even say if I manage to get through his novels, thought liked his fairy tales, so it's probable.
9. Read one additional book from a series you already started
Blood of Elves by Andrzej Sapkowski .
You might like his The Last Wish, which is a short story anthology that twists known fairy tales and serves them in Slavic flavour. Probably a lot of his style and colorful language got lost in translation, but you can give it a try.

One of Andrew Lang's Colored Fairy Books
10. A retelling, novel inspired by or original tale based on a classic European myth, fairy or folk tale for example Arthurian legends.
Does story inspired by mythology in general and Atlantis count?
If so, Trzecia cywilizacja [The third civilisation] . Polish sci fi about the man who became fascinated with the notion of cosmic refugees coming to Earth from a far away star. He could observe their rise and fall as Gods thanks to discovered ancient technology kept by Dogon people (mentioned Ea, Osiris, Prometheus, and Atlantis plays important part). Basically the more you know of different pantheons, the more fun it gets. Not published in English.
If not, then Attempt(?)/ Assassination of Theseus by Kir Bulychev (Russian ->Polish). No English translation
11. One collection of Essential Fairy Tales or Myths or novel or retellings based on an essential fairy tale or myth
The Fairy Tales Of Madame d'Aulnoy
12. A novel or short story anthology in translation
Rytuał by Marina and Sergey Dyachenko. According to Polish reviewers, the story twists the basic fairy tale trope of kidnapping a princess by dragon. Sadly not available in English. I read Dyachenko's Age of Witches and enjoyed it. Both Age of witches and The Scar is translated to English.
Journey to the west - chinese classic (Chinese -> English)

Edit: Corrected grammar and wrong title.


message 6: by Tamara (new)

Tamara Agha-Jaffar | 724 comments Thanks, Melanti, for starting this off.

Here's my tentative list so far, but it's subject to change depending on if I find something more interesting. It's heavy on mythology and light on fairy tales. I hope that's ok. Also, I read a few of these years ago and want to re-read them.

1. A book by a modern author known for the retelling genre (Possibly a book by Michelle Moran. She writes novels about historical figures.

2. One of Andrew Lang's Colored Fairy Books (?)

3. A book involving teleportation or transportation to another world or fairy tale world (Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. He goes on a journey to find the green knight (aka “the jolly green giant")

4. A retelling of a children's or adults literature classic (?)

5. A book that has been nominated for the Mythopoeic Award (check library list for mythopoeic award finalists)

6.A nonfiction book about a famous fairy/folk tale or myth author or character: (A book by Joyce Tyldesley--either Nefertiti or Cleopatra. I read her Hatchepsut: The Female Pharaoh and thoroughly enjoyed it.

7. A book that is a retelling inspired by or a collection of fairy/folk tales or myths from a non-European culture: The Storytelling Stone: Traditional Native American Myths and Tales

8. A book that is a retelling inspired by or a collection of original tales of First Nations/Native American Folktales or Mythology:
Spider Woman's Granddaughters: Traditional Tales and Contemporary Writing by Native American Women

9. Read one additional book from a series you already started (Possibly Robert Low’s historical fiction: The White Raven. I’ve read #1 and #2 in the series. This is #3.

10. A retelling, novel inspired by or original tale based on a classic European myth, fairy or folk tale for example Arthurian legends: Grendel

11. One collection of Essential Fairy Tales or Myths or novel or retellings based on an essential fairy tale or myth: The Watch. It's supposedly based on Antigone

12. A novel or short story anthology in translation: Either A Late Chrysanthemum: Twenty-one Stories from the Japanese or Distant View of a Minaret and Other Stories (Egypt).


message 7: by Tamara (new)

Tamara Agha-Jaffar | 724 comments Question: is a translation of a classic considered a retelling?

I ask because I'll be reading Emily Wilson's The Odyssey. She is the first female to translate the Odyssey. From what I've read so far, her translation differs in significant ways from the previous translations i've read by Frazer or Fitzgerald. So I'm wondering if it's considered a retelling. If so, can I use it for #4?


message 8: by Asaria (last edited Jan 03, 2018 03:04PM) (new)

Asaria | 568 comments Tamara wrote: "Question: is a translation of a classic considered a retelling?

I ask because I'll be reading Emily Wilson's The Odyssey. She is the first female to translate the Odyssey. From wh..."


That's a good question. I'm curious too, as some known to me translations strongly depart from the source material.


message 9: by Melanti (new)

Melanti | 2125 comments Mod
Um, I wouldn't personally, unless it was an extremely loose translation.

For instance, One Thousand and One Nights The Canterbury Tales: A Retelling could be considered retellings.

While Emily Wilson's seems more contemporary than some of the others, the reviews indicate she stuck pretty closely to the original Greek whenever she could, so I wouldn't think it'd be a retelling.

A better fit might be #12.


message 10: by Tamara (new)

Tamara Agha-Jaffar | 724 comments Melanti wrote: "Um, I wouldn't personally, unless it was an extremely loose translation..."

That's ok. I'll find something else for #4. Thanks.


message 11: by Leah (new)

Leah (flying_monkeys) | 1009 comments Tamara wrote: "Thanks, Melanti, for starting this off.

Here's my tentative list so far, but it's subject to change depending on if I find something more interesting. It's heavy on mythology and light on fairy tales."


I, for one, appreciate your list because I don't often know which books are using or based off mythology and you seem to find some really interesting reads.


message 12: by Tamara (new)

Tamara Agha-Jaffar | 724 comments Thanks, Leah.
To be honest, some times I feel like a bit of an odd ball here because I am more into mythology than fairy tales.


message 13: by Leah (last edited Dec 31, 2018 05:46PM) (new)

Leah (flying_monkeys) | 1009 comments Y'all have some great lists started.

I'm going for 24 books again this year. Also, I'm still working through the Endicott lists, so I looked at those first and many of those were also Mythopoeic nominees/ winners. My planning became quite lengthy, which led me to create a page on my site for initial ideas/thoughts.

1. A book by a modern author known for the retelling genre - e.g., De Lint, McKillip, Marillier, Jane Yolen, Robin McKinley, etc.

Winter Rose by Patricia McKillip - my review
(also on Endicott list; also Mythopoeic nominee)
Daughter of the Forest by Juliet Marillier (also on Endicott list)
White as Snow by Tanith Lee (also on Endicott list)

2. One of Andrew Lang's Colored Fairy Books. Skipping this one

The Blue Fairy Book by Andrew Lang

3. A book involving teleportation or transportation to another world or fairy-tale world.

Labyrinth Lost by Zoraida Córdova
A Wish After Midnight by Zetta Elliott
The Treachery of Beautiful Things by Ruth Frances Long (my review)
Stardust by Neil Gaiman (my review)
Half World by Hiromi Goto (my review)

4. A retelling of a children's or adult's literature classic.

The Child Thief by Brom [Peter Pan]
The Hazel Wood by Melissa Albert [Alice] (my review)
Girls Made of Snow and Glass by Melissa Bashardoust [Snow White] (my review)

5. A book that has been nominated for the Mythopoeic Award.

Will Do Magic for Small Change by Andrea Hairston (my review)
Redemption in Indigo by Karen Lord (my review)
The New Moon's Arms by Nalo Hopkinson
Shadowshaper by Daniel José Older
Grendel by John Gardner

6. A non-fiction book about the author of, or a character from, a famous fairy/folk tale or myth.

The Invention of Angela Carter: A Biography by Edmund Gordon
The Other Alice: The Story of Alice Liddell and Alice in Wonderland by Christina Björk (my review)

7. A retelling inspired by fairy/folk tales or myths from a non-European culture.

The Djinn Falls in Love & Other Stories
Sister of My Heart by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni
Zahrah the Windseeker by Nnedi Okorafor (my review)
The People Could Fly: American Black Folktales by Virginia Hamilton (my review)
Brown Girl in the Ring by Nalo Hopkinson (my review)
Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor (my review)

8. A retelling inspired by First Nations/Native American folktales or mythology.

Ceremony by Leslie Marmon Silko (Laguna Pueblo)
Trail of Lightning by Rebecca Roanhorse (Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo) (my review)
When the Chenoo Howls: Native American Tales of Terror by Joseph Bruchac (Abenaki) (my review)

9. Read one additional book from a series you started prior to 2018.

Beneath the Sugar Sky by Seanan McGuire (my review)
The Mermaid's Madness by Jim C. Hines
Who Fears Death by Nnedi Okorafor
Beauty, Beast, and Belladonna by Maia Chance
The Current and the Cure (The Water and the Wild #3) by K.E. Ormsbee
The Girl in the Tower by Katherine Arden (my review)

10. A retelling, novel inspired by, or original tale based on a classic European myth, fairy or folktale - e.g., Arthurian legends.

Blue Diary by Alice Hoffman [Bluebeard] (also on Endicott list; my review)
Fair Peril by Nancy Springer [Frog Prince] (also on Endicott list; also Mythopoeic nominee)
Blanca & Roja by Anna-Marie McLemore [Snow White and Rose Red; Swan Lake] (my review)
The Sleeper and the Spindle by Neil Gaiman (my review)

11. One "essential" fairy tale, folktale, myth - i.e., A book considered an essential [fairy-tale/ folktale/ mythic] read that you haven't gotten around to reading yet. This could be a novel or a collection.

The Last Unicorn by Peter S. Beagle
Deerskin by Robin McKinley (my review)

12. A novel or short story anthology in translation. Skipping this one

The Wandering Unicorn by Manuel Mujica Lainez [Argentina] (also Mythopoeic nominee)
Troll: A Love Story by Johanna Sinisalo [Finland] (also on Endicott list)
The Garden of the Departed Cats by Bilge Karasu [Turkey] (also on Endicott list)


message 14: by Tamara (new)

Tamara Agha-Jaffar | 724 comments Nice list, Leah! I might end up "borrowing" some of your suggestions.


message 15: by Vaelkyrja (last edited Feb 27, 2018 08:46AM) (new)

Vaelkyrja | 8 comments Working list - will update when read!

1. A book by a modern author known for the the retelling genre - Winter Rose

2. One of Andrew Lang's Colored Fairy Books - The Pink Fairy Book

✔ 3. A book involving teleportation or transportation to another world or fairy tale world - Every Heart a Doorway 2/03/2018

4. A retelling of a children's or adults literature classic - Girl Meets Boy (retelling of Iphis + Ianthe, from Ovid)

5. A book that has been nominated for the Mythopoeic Award - The Wood Wife

6. A nonfiction book about a famous fairy/folk tale or myth author or character - The Rebirth of Rapunzel: A Mythic Biography of the Maiden in the Tower

✔ 7. A book that is a retelling inspired by or a collection of fairy/folk tales or myths from a non-European culture - The Bear and the Nightingale 1/30/2018

8. A book that is a retelling inspired by or a collection of original tales of of First Nations/Native American Folktales or Mythology - The Grass Dancer

✔ 9. Read one additional book from a series you already started - King of Thorns 1/14/2018

✔ 10. A retelling, novel inspired by or original tale based on a classic European myth, fairy or folk tale - Cruel Beauty 2/24/2018

11. One collection of Essential Fairy Tales or Myths, or novel or retelling based on an essential fairy tale or myth - The Forbidden Wish

12. A novel or short story anthology in translation - Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood


message 16: by Rachel (last edited Jan 10, 2018 06:08AM) (new)

Rachel | 169 comments My working list:

1. A book by a modern author known for the the retelling genre ( De Lint,McKillip,Marillier,Jane Yolen,Robin McKinley etc)
The Very Best of Charles De Lint
The Changeling Sea

2. One of Andrew Lang's Colored Fairy Books
The Yellow Fairy Book

3. A book involving teleportation or transportation to another world or fairy tale world
The Door in the Hedge

4. A retelling of a children's or adults literature classic
The Wooden Prince

5. A book that has been nominated for the Mythopoeic Award
The Wood Wife

6.A nonfiction book about a famous fairy/folk tale or myth author or character.

7. A book that is a retelling inspired by or a collection of fairy/folk tales or myths from a non-European culture.
Starry River of the Sky
Yume No Hon
The Fox Woman
The Girl in the Tower

8. A book that is a retelling inspired by or a collection of original tales of of First Nations/Native American Folktales or Mythology
Green Grass, Running Water

9. Read one additional book from a series you already started
The Hollowing

10. A retelling, novel inspired by or original tale based on a classic European myth, fairy or folk tale for example Arthurian legends.
Spindle's End
Peter: The Untold True Story

11. One collection of Essential Fairy Tales or Myths or novel or retellings based on an essential fairy tale or myth
Toads and Diamonds
The Once and Future King

12. A novel or short story anthology in translation
Bee, The Princess of the Dwarves (France)
Wonder Tales (France)


message 17: by Jalilah (last edited Jan 06, 2018 05:31PM) (new)

Jalilah | 4286 comments Mod
Great Lists Everyone!

Leah wrote: "I for one, appreciate your list because I don't often know which books are using or based off mythology and you seem to find some really interesting reads. ."
Tamara wrote: "Thanks, Leah.
To be honest, some times I feel like a bit of an odd ball here because I am more into mythology than fairy tales."


I feel the same way as Leah, Tamara! I really appreciate your list. I think many of us are interested in mythology, but there seem to be much more fairy tale retellings or books inspired by than ones with mythology. Even the Endicot Mythic fiction list has way more books inspired by or containing fairy tales. To be honest some times I am not even sure what exactly the difference is.


message 18: by Nerdy Werewolf (new)

Nerdy Werewolf (halogen) Yay! I'm a bit late to the start, but I'm in!


message 19: by Nerdy Werewolf (last edited May 15, 2018 07:02AM) (new)

Nerdy Werewolf (halogen) My list to be updated as I go along:

4/12

1. A book by a modern author known for the the retelling genre ( De Lint,McKillip,Marillier,Jane Yolen,Robin McKinley etc)

2. One of Andrew Lang's Colored Fairy Books
The Red Fairy Book or The Olive Fairy Book
✔3. A book involving teleportation or transportation to another world or fairy tale world
The Brightest Fell 1/18/18

4. A retelling of a children's or adults literature classic
Chasing Rabbits
✔5. A book that has been nominated for the Mythopoeic Award
The Goose Girl 1/26/18

6.A nonfiction book about a famous fairy/folk tale or myth author or character.
7. A book that is a retelling inspired by or a collection of fairy/folk tales or myths from a non-European culture.
A Thousand Nights or The Djinn Falls in Love & Other Stories
8. A book that is a retelling inspired by or a collection of original tales of of First Nations/Native American Folktales or Mythology
Shadow of Time or Cry of the Sea
9. ✔Read one additional book from a series you already started
A Court of Mist and Fury 5/7/18
✔10. A retelling, novel inspired by or original tale based on a classic European myth, fairy or folk tale for example Arthurian legends.
Twisted: The Girl Who Uncovered Rumpelstiltskin's Name 1/29/18

Puss without Boots: A Puss in Boots Retelling
✔11. One collection of Essential Fairy Tales or Myths or novel or retellings based on an essential fairy tale or myth
Entwined 1/27/18

12. A novel or short story anthology in translation

The Red Fairy Book by Andrew Lang The Olive Fairy Book by Andrew Lang The Brightest Fell (October Daye, #11) by Seanan McGuire Chasing Rabbits (The Underground, #1) by Erin R. Bedford The Goose Girl (The Books of Bayern, #1) by Shannon Hale A Thousand Nights (A Thousand Nights, #1) by E.K. Johnston The Djinn Falls in Love & Other Stories by Mahvesh Murad Shadow of Time by Jen Minkman Cry of the Sea (Juniper Sawfeather, #1) by D.G. Driver A Court of Mist and Fury (A Court of Thorns and Roses, #2) by Sarah J. Maas Twisted The Girl Who Uncovered Rumpelstiltskin's Name by Bonnie M. Hennessy Puss without Boots by Shari L. Tapscott Entwined by Heather Dixon


message 20: by Jalilah (new)

Jalilah | 4286 comments Mod
Holly wrote: "Yay! I'm a bit late to the start, but I'm in!"

You're not late at all Holly!


message 21: by Jalilah (last edited Jan 16, 2018 05:19PM) (new)

Jalilah | 4286 comments Mod
I am looking forward to this challenge!
I have no idea what I'll read for most of the categories.
My first book of the year was Son of a Trickster and counts for #8

These are the only ones I've decided on:
2. One of Andrew Lang's Colored Fairy Books
The Green Fairy Book

5. A book that has been nominated for the Mythopoeic Award
Will Do Magic for Small Change by Andrea Hairston

6.A nonfiction book about a famous fairy/folk tale or myth author or character. I'm not sure if Leonora: A Novel Inspired by the Life of Leonora Carrington would qualify?
Opinions everyone?

8. A book that is a retelling inspired by or a collection of original tales of of First Nations/Native American Folktales or Mythology
Son of a Trickster by Eden Robinson

9. Read one additional book from a series you already started
If the sequel to Son of a Trickster comes out in 2018 I will read it!

11. One collection of Essential Fairy Tales or Myths or novel or retellings based on an essential fairy tale or myth
I will use this as an opportunity to finally read the entire Italian Folktales by Italo Calvino. I only read about 1/4 when it was our group read a few years ago and have wanted to finish it ever since.

12. A novel or short story anthology in translation
A Hundred and One Nights


message 22: by Tamara (new)

Tamara Agha-Jaffar | 724 comments I have a question.
I just finished Caroline Alexander's The War That Killed Achilles: The True Story of Homer's Iliad and the Trojan War. I'm wondering if that would work for #6 in the challenge:
A nonfiction book about a famous fairy/folk tale or myth author or character.


message 23: by Jalilah (new)

Jalilah | 4286 comments Mod
Tamara wrote: "I have a question.
I just finished Caroline Alexander's The War That Killed Achilles: The True Story of Homer's Iliad and the Trojan War. I'm wondering if that would work for #6 in ..."

I would think so, but I'll let the others chime in too. We don't police these challenges and at the end of the day, everyone can read what they want.


message 24: by Lacey (new)

Lacey Louwagie | 236 comments Vaelkyrja wrote: "Working list - will update when read!

3. A book involving teleportation or transportation to another world or fairy tale world - Into the Land of the Unicorns (first re-read since age 9!)


Ha, I have this one in my collection, too! I haven't read it yet, and I bought it as an adult. I can never resist unicorn books when I spot them at used booksales. :) It must have been decent -- at least by a 9-year-old's standards -- if you are contemplating a re-read!


message 25: by Jalilah (new)

Jalilah | 4286 comments Mod
I just completed Will Do Magic for Small Change for 5. A book that has been nominated for the Mythopoeic Award

Here is my review, although I have not made up my mind about the Stars! https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 26: by Nerdy Werewolf (last edited Jan 24, 2018 06:14AM) (new)

Nerdy Werewolf (halogen) Can someone tell me what counts as "an Essential Fairy Tale or Myth?" Is there a master list somewhere? I'm looking at number 11. :)


message 27: by Nerdy Werewolf (last edited Jan 24, 2018 07:08AM) (new)

Nerdy Werewolf (halogen) Oooh! Also, is there a list of which authors are considered acceptable for #1? There are so many that I haven't read yet and I don't know the genre as well as some others here.

Would Heather Dixon count?


message 28: by Jalilah (last edited Jan 25, 2018 12:15PM) (new)

Jalilah | 4286 comments Mod
Holly wrote: "Oooh! Also, is there a list of which authors are considered acceptable for #1? There are so many that I haven't read yet and I don't know the genre as well as some others here.

Would [author:Heath..."


Holly wrote: "Can someone tell me what counts as "an Essential Fairy Tale or Myth?" Is there a master list somewhere? I'm looking at number 11. :)"

Hi Holly,
The idea of our challenge is just to get us to read things we haven't read before. We don't have strict rules or police people for what they read. At the end of the day everybody reads what they want.
That being said, I would think # 11 would be "Essential" in the sense that everyone who is interested in Fairy Tales or Myths should read. I would suggest starting by going through what you've read and not read. Have you read alll the famous Grimms tales for example? If not, start there and read a collection of them. If you read a lot of Grimms, how about the French Fairy take authors upon many of the Grimms tales are based?
Or if you're not familiar with Greek myths you could start there.
Or if you've read all the classic European tales ( assuming Greek is European) read a collection of Non-European tales that you're unfamiliar with.
You have a lot of leeway in regards to # 1, A book by a modern author known for the retelling genre. I tend to think of the authors listed above because they've been around a while and really considered masters that this type of fiction. Have you read any of them? If not, I'd definitely consider trying them! I can't really comment if Heather Dixon is really famous for this type of writing. Its subjective as to how someone is considered well known or not.

I hope this helps. Hopefully some of the other members will chime in! I'd also just suggest following this thread to see what others are reading to get ideas.


message 29: by Tamara (new)

Tamara Agha-Jaffar | 724 comments I just completed The Watch by Joydeep Roy-Bhattacharya for #10. A retelling, novel inspired by or original tale based on a classic European myth, fairy or folk tale for example Arthurian legends.

The Watch is a very powerful novel based on the Antigone myth. It is situated at an isolated American outpost in Afghanistan.
My review:

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

Another novel that can be read for this category is by Kamila Shamsie called Home Fire. It, too, is based on Antigone. It was good but not nearly as intense or as strong as The Watch.

My review of Home Fire
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 30: by Melanti (last edited Jan 25, 2018 08:19AM) (new)

Melanti | 2125 comments Mod
Lila wrote: "Holly wrote: "Oooh! Also, is there a list of which authors are considered acceptable for #1? There are so many that I haven't read yet and I don't know the genre as well as some others here.

Would..."


I think Lila's explained it pretty well.
For #11, things like Grimms, Anderson, Perrault (or another French collection), Norse, Greek, Roman, etc. Basically, think of what retellings you've read, and if you've read the original tales.

For #1, I think we were thinking of those authors that it seems everyone but you have read. Sort of like "modern classics" but with retellings.

Heather Dixon has only written one retelling, right? I wouldn't personally count her, but I see you're reading Shannon Hale, and I'd be more inclined to count her. I'm seeing Gaiman on your to-read list, too, and I know we talked about counting him and we all agreed he should count.


message 31: by Tamara (last edited Jan 25, 2018 08:13AM) (new)

Tamara Agha-Jaffar | 724 comments Is the only difference between #10 and #11 that #10 has to be based on a European myth and #11 doesn't? Or is there some other difference i'm not seeing?


message 32: by Melanti (new)

Melanti | 2125 comments Mod
I think the concept behind #11 was to try to get people to read those major collections of tales - Grimms, Anderson, Norse, Greek, Arabian Nights, etc. Or the major, very well known retellings - The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories, etc.

So, akin to another "classics" category.

#10 is any European one - whether it be well-known/classic or not.


message 33: by Tamara (new)

Tamara Agha-Jaffar | 724 comments Melanti wrote: "I think the concept behind #11 was to try to get people to read those major collections of tales - Grimms, Anderson, Norse, Greek, Arabian Nights, etc. Or the major, very well known retellings - [b..."

Got it. Thanks.


message 34: by Nerdy Werewolf (new)

Nerdy Werewolf (halogen) Thanks for all the feedback, everyone!


message 35: by Jalilah (last edited Apr 13, 2018 07:55AM) (new)

Jalilah | 4286 comments Mod
This is what I've read up to now:
5. A book that has been nominated for the Mythopoeic Award
Will Do Magic for Small Change
7. A book that is a retelling inspired by or a collection of fairy/folk tales or myths from a non-European culture.
Redemption in Indigo
8. A book that is a retelling inspired by or a collection of original tales of of First Nations/Native American Folktales or Mythology
Son of a Trickster
9. Read one additional book from a series you already started
Akata Warrior

And The Treachery of Beautiful Things could count for either
3. A book involving teleportation or transportation to another world or fairy tale world
or
10. A retelling, novel inspired by or original tale based on a classic European myth, fairy or folk tale for example Arthurian legends.


message 36: by Jalilah (new)

Jalilah | 4286 comments Mod
I am adding Gilgamesh: A New English Version for 11. One collection of Essential Fairy Tales or Myths
I really do feel it's an "essential" myth that everyone should know!


message 37: by Tamara (new)

Tamara Agha-Jaffar | 724 comments Lila wrote: "I am adding Gilgamesh: A New English Version for 11. One collection of Essential Fairy Tales or Myths
I really do feel it's an "essential" myth that everyone should know!"


I agree completely. I'm going to do the same :)


message 38: by Kelsey (last edited May 02, 2018 11:24PM) (new)

Kelsey | 84 comments I haven't actively participated in the group reading challenge in the past, but I thought it would be interesting to track how many of the challenges I end up hitting in the course of the year, even if I'm not necessarily going out of my way to do so.

I've kind of just stuck everything that could count in as many places as it might fit for now. It's interesting to see that I've apparently read a TON of portal fantasy so far this year, but not a lot of retellings, which is kind of unusual for me.


1. A book by a modern author known for the the retelling genre ( De Lint,McKillip,Marillier,Jane Yolen,Robin McKinley etc)
Briar Rose

2. One of Andrew Lang's Colored Fairy Books

3. A book involving teleportation or transportation to another world or fairy tale world
The Book of Pearl, Stardust, The Glass Town Game, Down Among the Sticks and Bones, The Hazel Wood

4. A retelling of a children's or adults literature classic
Currently reading The Queens of Innis Lear, if that counts.

5. A book that has been nominated for the Mythopoeic Award
Briar Rose, Redemption in Indigo, Stardust

6.A nonfiction book about a famous fairy/folk tale or myth author or character.

7. A book that is a retelling inspired by or a collection of fairy/folk tales or myths from a non-European culture. Redemption in Indigo

8. A book that is a retelling inspired by or a collection of original tales of of First Nations/Native American Folktales or Mythology

9. Read one additional book from a series you already started
The Tropic of Serpents, The Voyage of the Basilisk (I think we read the first book in this group a while back?) Also possibly The Girl from the Other Side: Siúil, A Rún, Volume 3, Throne of Jade, and Finn Family Moomintroll if those are the sorts of things one might count.

10. A retelling, novel inspired by or original tale based on a classic European myth, fairy or folk tale for example Arthurian legends.

11. One collection of Essential Fairy Tales or Myths or novel or retellings based on an essential fairy tale or myth

12. A novel or short story anthology in translation
The Book of Pearl


I don't THINK Wonder Tales: Six French Stories of Enchantment, Jackalope Wives And Other Stories, The Starlit Wood: New Fairy Tales, Akata Witch, or The Wingsnatchers fit any of the challenges, but correct me if I'm wrong, since they're all in the general spirit of the group.


message 39: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 3491 comments Mod
Kelsey wrote: "I don't THINK Wonder Tales: Six French Stories of Enchantment, Jackalope Wives And Other Stories, The Starlit Wood: New Fairy Tales, Akata Witch, or The Wingsnatchers fit any of the challenges, but correct me if I'm wrong, since they're all in the general spirit of the group. "

I think Wonder Tales could count as #11.


message 40: by Melanti (new)

Melanti | 2125 comments Mod
Akata Witch fits #7 also.


message 41: by Jalilah (new)

Jalilah | 4286 comments Mod
Kelsey wrote: "I haven't actively participated in the group reading challenge in the past, but I thought it would be interesting to track how many of the challenges I end up hitting in the course of the year, eve..."

I agree that Wonder Tales: Six French Stories of Enchantment would count for #11 and Akata Witch counts for # 7. I used the sequel Akata Warrior for #9.
I am not familiar with the other books you mentioned but the Starlight Wood might also count for 11


message 42: by Kelsey (new)

Kelsey | 84 comments Thanks for the input! Perhaps Jackalope Wives And Other Stories could be slotted under #1 as well? T. Kingfisher (AKA Ursula Vernon) hasn't been around for as long as some of the more classic authors listed in the example, but I'd argue she's known for her retellings.


message 43: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 3491 comments Mod
Yes, Starlit Wood would definitely count for #11 too. I liked that collection!


message 44: by Jalilah (new)

Jalilah | 4286 comments Mod
I've just added The Hazel Wood for 3. A book involving teleportation or transportation to another world or fairy tale world, so I've now read 8 books.
Any ideas for what to read for #6 and #12? I'd like to know what others are reading.


message 45: by Leah (new)

Leah (flying_monkeys) | 1009 comments Lila, if you check out my progress post (click here to jump up there vs scrolling up) there's a few ideas... I took most of my ideas for #12 from Endicott lists. And I took a quick peek at the Angela Carter bio (okay I read about 10 pages) and it's looking pretty good, in case anyone else enjoys her writing and would like to know more about her life/career.


message 46: by Melanti (last edited May 16, 2018 07:53PM) (new)

Melanti | 2125 comments Mod
I need to update my post.

For #12, I read Faust, which is a retelling of the Doctor Faustus/Mephistopheles myth.

I was going to read Beowulf & Grendel: The Truth Behind England's Oldest Legend for #6, but it didn't live up to my expectations. I'm not sure what I'll read instead.

Another possibility for #12 is Lion's Honey: The Myth of Samson... The rest of the series might be worth a look but I admit there's more misses than hits once you get through the first couple (English) books.


message 47: by Jalilah (last edited May 17, 2018 07:51AM) (new)

Jalilah | 4286 comments Mod
Leah wrote: "Lila, if you check out my progress post (click here to jump up there vs scrolling up) there's a few ideas... I took most of my ideas for #12 from Endicott lists. And I took a quick peek at the Ange..."

It occurred to me after I posted that The Turnip Princess and Other Newly Discovered Fairy Tales is translated from German and since I'm reading it now, I'll count it for #12

But thanks for the tip for #6, the Angela Carter bio! I wish I liked her writing more! It could be though that even though I'm not a huge fan of her writing, her life story would still be interesting.
Ideally I'd like a bio about one of the female French court writers like Marie-Catherine d'Aulnoy or Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont.


message 48: by Melanti (new)

Melanti | 2125 comments Mod
I wish there was a bio of Charlotte-Rose de Caumont de La Force. (The one Bitter Greens was based on.)


message 49: by Jalilah (new)

Jalilah | 4286 comments Mod
Melanti wrote: "I wish there was a bio of Charlotte-Rose de Caumont de La Force. (The one Bitter Greens was based on.)"

Yes, same here!


message 50: by Leah (last edited May 17, 2018 11:11AM) (new)

Leah (flying_monkeys) | 1009 comments Lila wrote: "But thanks for the tip for #6, the Angela Carter bio! I wish I liked her writing more! It could be though that even though I'm not a huge fan of her writing, her life story would still be interesting."

If you enjoy biographies in general, because you're learning about someone's life, perhaps from a wildly different lifestyle or culture than your own, then I'd say you would probably enjoy The Invention of Angela Carter: A Biography - even if you're not a fan of her writing.

Melanti wrote: "I wish there was a bio of Charlotte-Rose de Caumont de La Force. (The one Bitter Greens was based on.)"

Me, three.


« previous 1
back to top