Venus Quotes

Quotes tagged as "venus" Showing 1-30 of 39
Sarah   Williams
“[The Old Astronomer to His Pupil]

Reach me down my Tycho Brahe, I would know him when we meet,
When I share my later science, sitting humbly at his feet;
He may know the law of all things, yet be ignorant of how
We are working to completion, working on from then to now.

Pray remember that I leave you all my theory complete,
Lacking only certain data for your adding, as is meet,
And remember men will scorn it, 'tis original and true,
And the obloquy of newness may fall bitterly on you.

But, my pupil, as my pupil you have learned the worth of scorn,
You have laughed with me at pity, we have joyed to be forlorn,
What for us are all distractions of men's fellowship and smiles;
What for us the Goddess Pleasure with her meretricious smiles.

You may tell that German College that their honor comes too late,
But they must not waste repentance on the grizzly savant's fate.
Though my soul may set in darkness, it will rise in perfect light;
I have loved the stars too fondly to be fearful of the night.

What, my boy, you are not weeping? You should save your eyes for sight;
You will need them, mine observer, yet for many another night.
I leave none but you, my pupil, unto whom my plans are known.
You 'have none but me,' you murmur, and I 'leave you quite alone'?

Well then, kiss me, -- since my mother left her blessing on my brow,
There has been a something wanting in my nature until now;
I can dimly comprehend it, -- that I might have been more kind,
Might have cherished you more wisely, as the one I leave behind.

I 'have never failed in kindness'? No, we lived too high for strife,--
Calmest coldness was the error which has crept into our life;
But your spirit is untainted, I can dedicate you still
To the service of our science: you will further it? you will!

There are certain calculations I should like to make with you,
To be sure that your deductions will be logical and true;
And remember, 'Patience, Patience,' is the watchword of a sage,
Not to-day nor yet to-morrow can complete a perfect age.

I have sown, like Tycho Brahe, that a greater man may reap;
But if none should do my reaping, 'twill disturb me in my sleep
So be careful and be faithful, though, like me, you leave no name;
See, my boy, that nothing turn you to the mere pursuit of fame.

I must say Good-bye, my pupil, for I cannot longer speak;
Draw the curtain back for Venus, ere my vision grows too weak:
It is strange the pearly planet should look red as fiery Mars,--
God will mercifully guide me on my way amongst the stars.”
Sarah Williams, Twilight Hours: A Legacy Of Verse

P.C. Cast
“Hey, Venus, I have two words for you,' Aphrodite said.
Venus hesitated and glanced over her shoulder at her ex-roommate. Aphrodite smiled her best mean-bitch sneer and said, 'Re. Bound.' She paused and gave a bithy smirk and then said, 'Good luck with that.”
P.C. Cast Kristin Cast

Catherynne M. Valente
“That's Venus, September thought. She was the goddess of love. It's nice that love comes on first thing in the evening, and goes out last in the morning. Love keeps the light on all night.”
Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

Steven Wright
“Sorry... my mind was wandering... one time it went all the way to Venus and ordered a meal I couldn’t pay for.”
Steven Wright

Anne Bishop
“The Dimwit's Guide to the Female Mind might assist your efforts in understanding human females. But it must be pointed out that this subject can be a dangerous adventure and should be undertaken with extreme caution. After all, human males have been trying to understand their females for generations, and most of the time they come away from these encounters looking like someone stuck their tails into an electric socket.”
Anne Bishop, Marked in Flesh

Ray Bradbury
“The rain continued. It was a hard rain, a perpetual rain, a sweating and steaming rain; it was a mizzle, a downpour, a fountain, a whipping at the eyes, an undertow at the ankles; it was a rain to drown all rains and the memory of rains.”
Ray Bradbury

Ursula K. Le Guin
“Aeneas' mother is a star?"

"No; a goddess."

I said cautiously, "Venus is the power that we invoke in spring, in the garden, when things begin growing. And we call the evening star Venus."

He thought it over. Perhaps having grown up in the country, among pagans like me, helped him understand my bewilderment. "So do we, he said. "But Venus also became more...With the help of the Greeks. They call her Aphrodite...There was a great poet who praised her in Latin. Delight of men and gods, he called her, dear nurturer. Under the sliding star signs she fills the ship-laden sea and the fruitful earth with her being; through her the generations are conceived and rise up to see the sun; from her the storm clouds flee; to her the earth, the skillful maker, offers flowers. The wide levels of the sea smile at her, and all the quiet sky shines and streams with light..."

It was the Venus I had prayed to, it was my prayer, though I had no such words. They filled my eyes with tears and my heart with inexpressible joy.”
Ursula K. Le Guin, Lavinia

“Sun stares at Mercury.
Mercury stares at Venus.
Venus stares at Earth.
Earth stares at Mars.
Mars states at Jupiter.
Jupiter stares at Saturn.
Saturn stares at Uranus.
Uranus stares at Neptune.
Neptune stares at Moon.
Moon stares at me.
Me stares at Sun.”
-Dipti Dhakul

Stefan Emunds
“Women are mysterious beings in which lie strange delights.”
Stefan Emunds

bell hooks
“In the Mars-and-Venus-gendered universe, men want power and women want emotional attachment and connection. On this planet nobody really has the opportunity to know love since it is power and not love that is the order of the day. The privilege of power is at the heart of patriarchal thinking. Girls and boys, men and women who have been taught this way almost always believe love is not important, or if it is, it is never as important as being powerful, dominant, in control, on top-being right. Women who give seemingly selfless adoration and care to the men in their lives appear to be obsessed with 'love,' but in actuality their actions are often a covert way to hold power. Like their male counterparts, they enter relationships speaking the words of love even as their actions indicate that maintaining power and control is their primary agenda.”
bell hooks, All About Love: New Visions

Nithin Purple
“The early dew-falls that did a pristine coating,
over the woods with its finest transparency,
glazed as like its wet white-glassy earrings that hung on the ears of wild flowers—unlatched my fancy.”
Nithin Purple, Venus and Crepuscule: Beauty and Violence on Me Thrown

C.S. Lewis
“The two creatures were sexless. But he of Malacandra was masculine (not male); she of Perelandra was feminine (not female). Malacandra seemed to him to have the look of one standing armed, at the ramparts of his own remote archaic world, in ceaseless vigilance, his eyes ever roaming the earth-ward horizon whence his danger came long ago. "A sailor's look," Ransom once said to me; "you know... eyes that are impregnated with distance." But the eyes of Perelandra opened, as it were, inward, as if they were the curtained gateway to a world of waves and murmurings and wandering airs, of life that rocked in winds and splashed on mossy stones and descended as the dew and arose sunward in thin-spun delicacy of mist. On Mars the very forests are of stone; in Venus the lands swim. For now he thought of them no more as Malacandra and Perelandra. He called them by their Tellurian names. With deep wonder he thought to himself, "My eyes have seen Mars and Venus. I have seen Ares and Aphrodite.”
C.S. Lewis, Perelandra

Erica Alex
“I, too, am a planet whose path creates a celestial pentagram.”
Erica Alex

Henry Williamson
“For within himself, be he clairvoyant and articulate, he will find latent the divisions of the mind of European man, and their opposing impulses.”
Henry Williamson, Lucifer Before Sunrise

Carl Sagan
“Observation: I can’t see a thing.
Conclusion: Dinosaurs.”
Carl Sagan

William Shakespeare
“What though the rose have prickles, yet 'tis pluck'd.”
William Shakespeare, Venus and Adonis

Isaac Asimov
“Re the temperature of Venus's surface

No one had expected such a hot Venus”
Isaac Asimov, The Secret of the Universe
tags: hot, venus

Heather Rose Jones
“Barbara took her accustomed place by the door but as the singing began Margerit beckoned her over to her side. "I haven't been following much except that it's all ancient Greeks and battles and such. What's happening now?"
Barbara knelt beside her and leaned close to whisper so as not to disturb the rest of the party. A brief synopsis of what had gone before took up the time while the chorus escorted the principles to the centre of the stage. "I haven't seen this performance before," Barbara added, "but I imagine this will be the grand love duet." As the soprano began, she concentrated on the stage to follow the opening phrases. The chorus had abandoned the field to the principles who faced each other against a backdrop of fluted columns.
"O! What strange fate is mine!" Barbara paused as the signature line was repeated several times. "I loved you in the guise of Mars, but now I am betrayed by Venus. The iron in your glance turns soft beneath my touch. I am undone. O Venus, you are cruel to mock me so." It continued on in the same vein until it was the mezzo's turn. Her lyrics ran much parallel with the soprano's. With less concentration required, Barbara ventured a glance to see Margerit's reaction. Margerit turned at the same moment and their eyes met as Barbara whispered Ifis's lines.
"O! What a strange fate is mine! In the guise of Mars I love you but now as Venus I'm betrayed. The Iron in my soul turns soft beneath your touch." Unconsciously, Margerit placed a hand on hers where it lay on the arm of her chair. "Fire runs through my veins - I am undone." Fire indeed ran through her veins. Her hand burned sweetly where Margerit touched it and she dared now take it back. Her voice grew husky. "Why do the gods mock me with desire I cannot sate?" Their eyes were still locked and Margerit's lips had parted in a little "o" of wonder. "O Venus, have mercy on one new come to your shrine."
When the soprano joined again for the duet, Margerit breathed along with her, "O! What strange fate is mine!"
With effort, Barbara wrenched her gaze away.”
Heather Rose Jones, Daughter of Mystery

Rolf van der Wind
“You are Venus, and I am your Moon
I am the secret that you will never tell
the best secrets are the most bent
forever your lover, never your man.”
Rolf van der Wind

Yusef Komunyakaa
“We were The Hottentot Venus
Draped in our mothers' dresses,
Wearing rouge & lipstick,
Pillows tucked under floral
& print cloth, the first day of spring,
As we balanced on high heels.
Women sat in a circle talking
About men; the girls off
Somewhere else, in other houses.
We felt the last kisses
Our mothers would give us
On the mouth.”
Yusef Komunyakaa
tags: venus

C.S. Lewis
“But whence came this curious difference between them? He found that he could point to no single feature wherein the difference resided, yet it was impossible to ignore. One could try - Ransom has tried a hundred times - to put it into words. He has said that Malacandra was like rhythm and Perelandra like melody. He has said that Malacandra affected him like a quantitative, Perelandra like an accentual, metre. He thinks that the first held in his hand something like a spear, but the hands of the other were open, with the palms towards him. But I don't know that any of these attempts has helped me much. At all events what Ransom saw at that moment was the real meaning of gender.”
C.S. Lewis

Michel de Montaigne
“Is it that we pretend to a reformation? Truly, no: but it may be we are more addicted to Venus than our fathers were. They are two exercises that thwart and hinder one another in their vigor. Lechery weakens our stomach on the one side; and on the other sobriety renders us more spruce and amorous for the exercise of love.”
Michel de Montaigne, The Complete Essays

Hanns Heinz Ewers
“Drink, drink! Bacchus is the enemy of Venus.

"From The Diary Of An Orange Tree”
Hanns Heinz Ewers, Nachtmahr: Strange Tales

“The Romans gave Venus, their goddess of love, many of the attributes of Bastet, and often depicted her with a cat. Some historians believe importing cats to England was the Romans' greatest contribution toward civilizing the British.”
Globe Digests, Cat Talk A Lighthearted Look at Living with Cats

Edgar Rice Burroughs
“I saw that argument was useless and said no more; there is no use arguing with a man who can multiply anything by the square root of minus one.”
Edgar Rice Burroughs

Leopold von Sacher-Masoch
“Aber du willst nur mein sein unter Bedingungen, während ich dir bedingungslos gehöre.”
Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, Venus in Furs

Jostein Gaarder
“Rekao sam ti da pomislim na Veroniku svaki put kad bacim pogled na tu planetu, jer "Venera" je stara rec za ljubav.”
Jostein Gaarder

Carl Sagan
“We are alive and we resonate with idea of life elsewhere, but only careful accumulation and assessment of the evidence can tell us whether a given world is inhabited.”
Carl Sagan

Dava Sobel
“Magellan’s sudden identification of millions of land forms fomented a crisis in nomenclature. The International Astronomical Union responded with an all-female naming scheme that evoked a goddess or giantess from every heritage and era, along with heroines real or invented. Thus the Venusian highlands, the counterparts to Earth’s continents, took the names of love goddesses — Aphrodite Terra, Ishtar Terra, Lada Terra, with hundreds of their hills and dales christened for fertility goddesses and sea goddesses. Large craters commemorate notable women (including American astronomer Maria Mitchell, who photographed the 1882 transit of Venus from the Vassar College Observatory), while small craters bear common first names for girls. Venus’s scarps hail seven goddesses of the hearth, small hills the goddesses of the sea, ridges the goddesses of the sky, and so on across low plains named from myth and legend for the likes of Helen and Guinevere, down canyons called after Moon goddesses and huntresses.”
Dava Sobel, The Planets

Shunya
“Suppose something is written on a blackboard. If you omit some parts and add some parts, you can turn it into anything. That's how mind of Venus-affected people work. Their mind omits and adds things so that they see what they want to see and not what is really out there.”
Shunya

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