Superstitions Quotes

Quotes tagged as "superstitions" (showing 1-30 of 30)
Sarah Addison Allen
“If anyone had been paying attention to the signs, they would have realized that air turns white when things are about to change, that paper cuts mean there's more to what's written on the page than meets the eye, and that birds are always out to protect you from things you don't see.”
Sarah Addison Allen, The Peach Keeper

Hypatia
“Fables should be taught as fables, myths as myths, and miracles as poetic fancies. To teach superstitions as truths is a most terrible thing. The child mind accepts and believes them, and only through great pain and perhaps tragedy can he be in after years relieved of them. In fact, men will fight for a superstition quite as quickly as for a living truth — often more so, since a superstition is so intangible you cannot get at it to refute it, but truth is a point of view, and so is changeable.”
Hypatia

Roman Payne
“Somewhere I’d heard, or invented perhaps, that the only pleasures found during a waning moon are misfortunes in disguise. Superstition aside, I avoid pleasure during the waning or absent moon out of respect for the bounty this world offers me. I profit from great harvests in life and believe in the importance of seasons.”
Roman Payne, Rooftop Soliloquy

Rick Yancey
“Nothing makes us love something more than the loss of it.”
Rick Yancey, The Curse of the Wendigo

Robert G. Ingersoll
“[Robert's eulogy at his brother, Ebon C. Ingersoll's grave. Even the great orator Robert Ingersoll was choked up with tears at the memory of his beloved brother]

The record of a generous life runs like a vine around the memory of our dead, and every sweet, unselfish act is now a perfumed flower.

Dear Friends: I am going to do that which the dead oft promised he would do for me.

The loved and loving brother, husband, father, friend, died where manhood's morning almost touches noon, and while the shadows still were falling toward the west.

He had not passed on life's highway the stone that marks the highest point; but, being weary for a moment, he lay down by the wayside, and, using his burden for a pillow, fell into that dreamless sleep that kisses down his eyelids still. While yet in love with life and raptured with the world, he passed to silence and pathetic dust.

Yet, after all, it may be best, just in the happiest, sunniest hour of all the voyage, while eager winds are kissing every sail, to dash against the unseen rock, and in an instant hear the billows roar above a sunken ship. For whether in mid sea or 'mong the breakers of the farther shore, a wreck at last must mark the end of each and all. And every life, no matter if its every hour is rich with love and every moment jeweled with a joy, will, at its close, become a tragedy as sad and deep and dark as can be woven of the warp and woof of mystery and death.

This brave and tender man in every storm of life was oak and rock; but in the sunshine he was vine and flower. He was the friend of all heroic souls. He climbed the heights, and left all superstitions far below, while on his forehead fell the golden dawning, of the grander day.

He loved the beautiful, and was with color, form, and music touched to tears. He sided with the weak, the poor, and wronged, and lovingly gave alms. With loyal heart and with the purest hands he faithfully discharged all public trusts.

He was a worshipper of liberty, a friend of the oppressed. A thousand times I have heard him quote these words: 'For Justice all place a temple, and all season, summer!' He believed that happiness was the only good, reason the only torch, justice the only worship, humanity the only religion, and love the only priest. He added to the sum of human joy; and were every one to whom he did some loving service to bring a blossom to his grave, he would sleep to-night beneath a wilderness of flowers.

Life is a narrow vale between the cold and barren peaks of two eternities. We strive in vain to look beyond the heights. We cry aloud, and the only answer is the echo of our wailing cry. From the voiceless lips of the unreplying dead there comes no word; but in the night of death hope sees a star and listening love can hear the rustle of a wing.

He who sleeps here, when dying, mistaking the approach of death for the return of health, whispered with his latest breath, 'I am better now.' Let us believe, in spite of doubts and dogmas, of fears and tears, that these dear words are true of all the countless dead.

And now, to you, who have been chosen, from among the many men he loved, to do the last sad office for the dead, we give his sacred dust.

Speech cannot contain our love. There was, there is, no gentler, stronger, manlier man.”
Robert G. Ingersoll, Some Mistakes of Moses

Amit Kalantri
“In spite of being complicated people choose superstitions over common sense.”
Amit Kalantri, Wealth of Words

Akif Kichloo
“That window which connects you
to the agony of other people;
that’s your soul.
Close that window and you are soulless.
And a soulless man is vestigial.
He hears but cannot listen. He sees but cannot notice.
And everyone knows:
when eyes and ears become jobless,
We look for excuses.
We hear angels and devils speak. We confabulate.
We make up gods
and lick their feet.

—Superstitions”
Akif Kichloo, Poems That Lose

Susan Elizabeth Phillips
“When it’s your fourth marriage, you tend to lose faith in superstitions.”
Susan Elizabeth Phillips, Ain't She Sweet

Saki
“Well in those parts (upcountry India) they have were-tigers, or think they have, and I must say that in this case, so far as sworn and uncontested evidence went, they had every ground for thinking so. However, as we gave up witchcraft prosecutions about three hundred years ago, we don’t like to have other people keeping on our discarded practices; it doesn’t seem respectful to our mental and moral position.”
Saki

Debasish Mridha
“Let us pray for wisdom not for superstitions.”
Debasish Mridha

Daniel Keyes
“He wished me luk. I hope I have luk. I got my rabits foot and my luky penny and my horshoe. Dr Strauss said dont be so superstishus Charlie. This is sience. I dont know what sience is but they all keep saying it so maybe its something that helps you have good luk.”
Daniel Keyes, Flowers for Algernon

Orlando Winters
“Like ugly Asian babies, valid superstitions don’t exist. At best, any perceived effect of a superstition is you merely psyching yourself out. Think of it as an asshole placebo.”
Orlando Winters, Stop Being a F***ing Idiot

Abhijit Naskar
“Let them learn at school whatever they learn to pass the examinations, but at home let the education that you provide be the kind that widens their perceptions and takes away the germs of prejudices that infect them while they are out in the world.”
Abhijit Naskar, Human Making is Our Mission: A Treatise on Parenting

M.F. Moonzajer
“I give no shit to what extent they believe in superstitions and fanaticism. But I will fight till death, if their fallacious belief hurts any individual.”
M.F. Moonzajer

“I've said this before: a lot of people think they're artists because they feel things deeply. You know, we're in a culture now and a time where people think they talk about their truth...'If I feel something so deeply, it must be true!' You know, 'I know that I was raped by a big-footed six and had to give up the...the big-foot baby two aliens to go back to Zontar!', you know? People believe this sh*t!

I talked about this crazy woman who I knew years ago who thinks she had a near-death experience and now could control electricity and talk to God and angels and stuff..and every poster she puts up that I see gets more elaborate and insane! You know...pretty soon, she's gonna be, you know, f***ing, who knows...ISIS! [...] it's like, these are the kinds of people...they're not only in the arts, they're everywhere, and years ago, when [politicians] would talk about the 'wisdom of the masses', the common people...the Internet has proved that's utterly ridiculous.”
Dan Schneider

“Dragons and Afterlife .. I don't see any difference between both of them, we didn't see neither the dragons nor afterlife, we just heard about them and both of them are superstitions with no scientific or logical evidence .. But the only reason you believe in afterlife unlike dragons is that you've been taught to believe in it from your birthday. now if they taught you to believe in dragons and if it were mentioned in your Bible or your holy book you would have believed in it .. herein lies the danger of religions, you can believe something exists without any evidence .. and that's why you should only follow science and let go of your religious teachings”
Sherif Gaber

Jung Chang
“A cautionary tale I had carried with me from China, and which I firmly believed, was that anyone who attempted to have a foreign lover would be drugged and carted back to China in a jute sack.”
Jung Chang, Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China

Karen Cecil Smith
“If decorum allowed, she would take tea at the hotel. Once inside, she might run into a rich northern gentleman who had ridden in this very coach. If only she could touch something colored blue for luck before entering the building! "Touch blue and your wish will come true." That, along with the rabbit's foot she always carried in her pocket, would almost ensure such a meeting.”
Karen Cecil Smith

Debasish Mridha
“When superstitions enter the world of imagination, then intelligence and science become fiction.”
Debasish Mridha

“Our Christianity has become superstitious.”
Sunday Adelaja

Abhijit Naskar
“Changing the spelling of one's name to ensure success, performing rituals for good luck, wearing colored gem stones for success in business – all these fall into the same category of psychological reinforcement. Hence, emerged the blood-sucking professions of astrology, palmistry, vastushastra, numerology etc. The very existence of these fraudulent professions is predicated on the fear and anxiety of vulnerable masses. Thus, a person’s superstitious beliefs become the tool of exploitation in the hands of ruthless fraudsters.”
Abhijit Naskar

Abhijit Naskar
“It is all about the trade of ignorance. And India is such a bronze-age nation that is filled with these trades (astrology, palm reading, vastushashtra and others).”
Abhijit Naskar, Prescription: Treating India's Soul

Abhijit Naskar
“If a God tends to reinforce the prejudices in a society instead of diminishing them from the society, then such God is worse than Cancer.”
Abhijit Naskar, Illusion of Religion: A Treatise on Religious Fundamentalism

Abhijit Naskar
“Come out, O lions, and shake off the ancient mysticism and prejudices.”
Abhijit Naskar, The Islamophobic Civilization: Voyage of Acceptance

Debasish Mridha
“When citizens of a country or nation believe in superstitions or dogma, they will inevitably suffer from tremendous misery or tragedy.”
Debasish Mridha

“I will not keep quiet until a revolution is started to fight ignorance and superstitions in the church of the lord Jesus Christ and in the nation of my birth.”
Sunday Adelaja

Hank Bracker
“Seafarers of yore were superstitious lot and paid a great deal of attention not to invoke the ire of the Gods. Walking under a ladder aboard ship insured bad luck! Breaking a mirror guaranteed 7 years of bad luck and whistling was verboten! When Ursula came aboard the QSMV Dominion Monarch, she was taught this lesson in a most emphatic way!
“What could best be described as an “old-salt,” was in charge when they were on the open deck of the ship. Apparently his job was to look out for the passengers’ safety, and he was a friendly sort. Talking about the lure of the sea, he explained to the children that they were never to whistle aboard any ship, for to do so would invoke the Gods and cause a terrible storm to toss them around. Being only 6 years old, Ursula hung on to his every word and explained that she didn’t know how to whistle. Laughing, he said that he would teach her, which he did. She became convinced that she could indeed “whistle up a storm,” one which never came!”
To this day Ursula believes this and throws a little salt over her shoulder if she spills any…. Yes, seafarers are still a superstitious lot!”
Hank Bracker

Abhijit Naskar
“Reasoning is the cure for superstitions and bigotry.”
Abhijit Naskar, Conscience over Nonsense