Statesmanship Quotes

Quotes tagged as "statesmanship" Showing 1-30 of 40
Benjamin Disraeli
“I am a Conservative to preserve all that is good in our constitution, a Radical to remove all that is bad. I seek to preserve property and to respect order, and I equally decry the appeal to the passions of the many or the prejudices of the few.”
Benjamin Disraeli

Ken Follett
“Americans talked about voters the same way Russians talked about Stalin. They had to be obeyed.”
Ken Follett, Winter of the World

Christopher Hitchens
“The President is also captured in a well-worn TV news clip, making a boilerplate response to a question on terrorism and then asking the reporters to watch his drive. Well, that's what you get if you catch the President on a golf course. If Eisenhower had done this, as he often did, it would have been presented as calm statesmanship. If Clinton had done it, as he often did, it would have shown his charm.”
Christopher Hitchens, Christopher Hitchens and His Critics: Terror, Iraq, and the Left

“Political parties are on the hunt to search and destroy each other, as though we were involved in some kind of enemy combat, rather than the work of statesmanship.”
John Lewis, Across That Bridge: A Vision for Change and the Future of America

Ljupka Cvetanova
“Help yourself with the state! It's on democracy!”
Ljupka Cvetanova, The New Land

Barbara W. Tuchman
“Diplomacy's primary law: LEAVE ROOM FOR NEGOTIATION.”
Barbara W. Tuchman, The Proud Tower: A Portrait of the World Before the War, 1890-1914

Eden Phillpotts
“Nine-nine of every hundred among you probably desire peace, while the balance may hold war a condition to be preferred; but what can be the mental norm of statesmanship where such a minority conquer the peace-lovers?”
Eden Phillpotts, Saurus

Stanley Hoffmann
“Statesmen should remember that they have been elected to persuade and to lead, and not just to accept as fixed the momentary moods and pernicious prejudices of the public.”
Stanley Hoffmann, World Disorders: Troubled Peace in the Post-Cold War Era

Gore Vidal
“presidents, when not outright telling lies, feel obliged to shade the truth most of the time. This is called politics; when a president lies successfully, he is called a statesman.”
Gore Vidal

“Politics look very simple to the outsider whether he is a businessman or a soldier – it is only when you get into it that all the angles and hard work become apparent. James Forrestal”
David Pietrusza, 1948: Harry Truman's Improbable Victory and the Year that Transformed America

Barbara W. Tuchman
“He was the most persuasive speaker, less for his words than character behind them. He made every listener feel he had done his best to master every aspect of this question, who has been driven by logic to arrive at certain conclusions, and who is disguising from us no argument on either side.”
Barbara W. Tuchman, The Proud Tower: A Portrait of the World Before the War, 1890-1914

Enoch Powell
“The supreme function of statesmanship is to provide against preventable evils.”
Enoch Powell, Enoch Powell's "Rivers of Blood" Speech 1968

Barbara W. Tuchman
“Party animosity was concealed under a veil of studied courtesy.”
Barbara W. Tuchman, The Proud Tower: A Portrait of the World Before the War, 1890-1914

Barbara W. Tuchman
“He believed that rank without power was a sham.”
Barbara W. Tuchman, The Proud Tower: A Portrait of the World Before the War, 1890-1914

Rick Perlstein
“An anti-politician is hardly an anti-politician once he starts winning and works to close the deal by working to sew up the Establishment.”
Rick Perlstein, The Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan

H.W. Brands
“He cultivated ideological fuzziness.”
H.W. Brands

Chris Matthews
“The author defines professionalism as exemplified by his subjects in their mutual unwillingness to take expected opposition personally. They would not allow grudges to get in the way of more important business.”
Chris Matthews, Tip and the Gipper: When Politics Worked

Barbara W. Tuchman
“He had become, through a combination of heritage and character, a keeper of the national conscience.”
Barbara W. Tuchman, The Proud Tower: A Portrait of the World Before the War, 1890-1914

Stephen L. Carter
“This isn't about your reputation. Our job right now is to make sure that there to ARE future historians.”
Stephen L. Carter, Back Channel

Amit Kalantri
“In a democracy government is the God.”
Amit Kalantri, Wealth of Words

Amit Kalantri
“State first, subject second, statesman last.”
Amit Kalantri, Wealth of Words

Stephen L. Carter
“He had been around politicians for a long time, and he was prepared for some outburst.”
Stephen L. Carter, Back Channel

“[T]here cannot be a more certain symptom of the approaching ruin of a State than when a firm adherence to party is fixed upon as the only test of merit, and all the qualifications requisite to a right discharge of every employment, are reduced to that single standard.”
Edward Wortley Montagu, Reflections on the Rise and Fall of the Ancient Republicks: Adapted to the Present State of Great Britain

Charles Emmerson
“The mantle of a great power (was) inescapable. Was it better to extend diplomatic recognition to an unattractive regime and thereby hope to achieve a measure of political stability – or to refuse to recognize the regime on principle, thus emboldening its opponents and running the risk of losing both American investors' money and the lives of American investment in the widening civil war which might follow? Was it preferable to intervene militarily to protect American interests and bring stability and freedom – or rather to maintain the purity of neutrality and avoid a potential quagmire, but run the risk of appearing weak, and leave the outcome to be determined by forces beyond one's control?”
Charles Emmerson, 1913: In Search of the World Before the Great War

Jon Meacham
“There is usually a moment in the life of a new president when he begins to see himself not as an aspirant desperate to win but as a statesman above the squalor and sweat of actual vote getting. Rising men do not like to be reminded of the smell of the stables; dignitaries dislike recollections of the dust through which they have come.”
Jon Meacham, Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power

Bangambiki Habyarimana
“If you look at it closely, every individual is a separate entity, state and culture. The macro state is a federation of citizens who accept to live under the same law.”
Bangambiki Habyarimana, Book of Wisdom

John F. Kennedy
“… the South is the land of Washington, who made our Nation – of Jefferson, who shaped its direction – and of Robert E. Lee who, after gallant failure, urged those who had followed him in bravery to reunite America in purpose and courage.” --President John F. Kennedy”
President John F. Kennedy

“Furthermore, a serious distortion of statesmanship occurs. Year by year, the statesman's time is increasingly devoted to an growing subset of misfits and neurotics, supposedly "oppressed" by an unfair social system which must be rectified. Little by little, the "oppressed" become the state's chief preoccupation, eclipsing the traditional tasks of statesmanship. The system no longer justifies itself in religious or historical terms, but on egalitarian grounds, in terms of "fairness" or "social justice." What actually happens, overall, is that greater and greater demands are placed upon the productive citizen to provide for the unproductive.”
J.R.Nyquist

“In real life, the political and strategic games used by politicians and statesmen are in fact social games - requiring social intelligence as well as technical mastery of information. The skills of the orator, cultivated by ancient statesmen like Cicero and Demosthenes, or by modern statesmen like Benjamin Disraeli and Abraham Lincoln, require emotional maturity and the talent of seeing events through the eyes of others. A great statesman sets aside his own egoism. He takes a more objective view. In this way, he avoids the errors that attend a purely egoistic standpoint. The explanation which Kierkegaard offered, which is none too flattering, is that people no longer desire a great king, a heroic liberator or an authoritative religion. They don’t want strict rules or high standards. That is because they want an easy time of it. They want a soft existence which can only be guaranteed by eschewing the great and heroic, the true and the noble. This is the moral perspective of high politics and of true statesmanship. Only those who reach this fifth stage can transform world calamity into world regeneration.”
J.R.Nyquist

« previous 1