Southern Quotes

Quotes tagged as "southern" Showing 1-30 of 107
Flannery O'Connor
“Total non-retention has kept my education from being a burden to me.”
Flannery O'Connor, The Habit of Being: Letters of Flannery O'Connor

Tallulah Bankhead
“Nobody can be exactly like me. Sometimes even I have trouble doing it.”
Tallulah Bankhead

Sarah Addison Allen
“Snow flurries began to fall and they swirled around people's legs like house cats. It was magical, this snow globe world.”
Sarah Addison Allen, The Sugar Queen

Sierra D. Waters
“No amount of me trying to explain myself was doing any good. I didn't even know what was going on inside of me, so how could I have explained it to them?”
Sierra D. Waters, Debbie.

Celia Rivenbark
“I'd sooner wear white shoes in February, drink unsweetened tea, and eat Miracle Whip instead of Duke's than utter the words 'you guys'.”
Celia Rivenbark, Bless Your Heart, Tramp: And Other Southern Endearments

Sarah Addison Allen
“She went to the window. A fine sheen of sugary frost covered everything in sight, and white smoke rose from chimneys in the valley below the resort town. The window opened to a rush of sharp early November air that would have the town in a flurry of activity, anticipating the tourists the colder weather always brought to the high mountains of North Carolina.

She stuck her head out and took a deep breath. If she could eat the cold air, she would. She thought cold snaps were like cookies, like gingersnaps. In her mind they were made with white chocolate chunks and had a cool, brittle vanilla frosting. They melted like snow in her mouth, turning creamy and warm.”
Sarah Addison Allen, The Sugar Queen

“Summer in the deep South is not only a season, a climate, it's a dimension. Floating in it, one must be either proud or submerged.”
Eugene Walter, The Untidy Pilgrim

“Being Southern isn't talking with an accent...or rocking on a porch while drinking sweet tea, or knowing how to tell a good story. It's how you're brought up -- with Southerners, family (blood kin or not) is sacred; you respect others and are polite nearly to a fault; you always know your place but are fierce about your beliefs. And food along with college football -- is darn near a religion.”
Jan Norris

Anne Rivers Siddons
“That sinuous southern life, that oblique and slow and complicated old beauty, that warm thick air and blood warm sea, that place of mists and languor and fragrant richness...”
Anne Rivers Siddons, Colony

Sierra D. Waters
“Today I wore a pair of faded old jeans and a plain grey baggy shirt. I hadn't even taken a shower, and I did not put on an ounce of makeup. I grabbed a worn out black oversized jacket to cover myself with even though it is warm outside. I have made conscious decisions lately to look like less of what I felt a male would want to see. I want to disappear.”
Sierra D. Waters, Debbie.

Pat Conroy
“There was a time when a new deputy tried to teach Mr. Fruit about the difference between a red and a green light, but Mr. Fruit had resisted all efforts to reorder what he had been doing perfectly well for many years. He had not only monitored the comings and goings of the town, his presence softened the ingrained evil that flourished along the invisible margins of the town’s consciousness. Any community can be judged in its humanity or corruption by how it manages to accommodate the Mr. Fruits of the world. Colleton simply adjusted itself to Mr. Fruit’s harmonies and ordinations. He did whatever he felt was needed and he did it with style. “That’s the Southern way” my grandmother said. “That’s the nice way.”
Pat Conroy, The Prince of Tides

Kellie Elmore
“Sing me a love song in a slow, southern drawl to the tune of sunny days...”
Kellie Elmore, Magic in the Backyard

Sarah Addison Allen
“The area was encompassed in a bubble of warm, fragrant steam from the funnel cake deep fryers. It smelled like sweet vanilla cake batter you licked off a spoon.”
Sarah Addison Allen, The Sugar Queen

Paula H. Deen
“Bein' rich is having leftovers. Good leftovers make yo' tongue fly outta yo' mouth and smack yo' brains out.”
Paula Deen

Nancy B. Brewer
“{Summertime she speaks of winter, she eats ham, but speaks of beef, got a good man but, flirts with another. She might as well go to hell, cause she ain't gonna be happy in heaven either!}”
Nancy B. Brewer

Attica Locke
“The decor was attractive and strong, but blander than she would have thought his wealth and position afforded him. Caren couldn't see the point of having that much money if all of it led to beige.”
Attica Locke, The Cutting Season

James Lee Burke
“But no one could say he hadn't gotten even. He could not count the field women whom he had sexually degraded and demoralized and in whom he had left his seed so their bastard children would be a daily visual reminder of what a plantation white man could do to a plantation black woman whenever he wanted, nor could he count the black men whom he had made fear his blackjack as they would fear Satan himself, making each of them a lifetime enemy of all white people.”
James Lee Burke, Jolie Blon's Bounce

Karen Harper
“Southern hospitality and Amish cooking - Ya'll Come Back, Danki.”
Karen Harper, Fall from Pride

Rebecca McNutt
“Don’t pack your bags just yet, stay awhile,
Don't try to run away to higher ground,
You're in my twisted clouds of sad misfortune,
And you are such an entertaining crowd!
(I’ve never had such cheerful toys to play with...)
Forget I said that – just a little natural disaster Humour,
Ha-ha-ha.

Pull up a rusty lawn chair
On the waterfront in New Orleans,
And ignore the wind that howls,
Things aren’t always as they seem.
I can smell fear in the air,
Fresh amidst the cornbread steam,
Forgive me if I sound excited,
(I’m going to be famous, you know!)
And let me take your money, please!

I’ll drown your family, hunt down your pets,
I’ve got tricks that I’ve never even tried yet,
And it’s so easy when I get the chance!
(I’ll swipe your house in just one glance!)

As the saying goes, it all comes out in the wash,
But I’m the only wash that leaves no stone unturned,
Financial devastation is my middle name,
And social degradation is my third!

You, little boy from the bayou bank,
You used to fish for pointless fun
(I can appreciate having fun),
But after I go, you’ll find your parents poor,
You’ll have eviction notices on your door,
You’ll have to sell any fish you can catch,
In a desperate grasp for money,
Although I hate to break it to you,
That bayou’s polluted, honey!
I see nothing in your future but welfare cheques!

And you there, little girl with the closet of toys,
You were born well-off with a room of your own,
You have dresses that look more like
They’re from fairy-tales,
Glittery lace on your schoolgirl gowns.

Wait ‘till murky water licks those hems,
And your family is bankrupt
And you’re homeless with them!
Accept what’s to come, won’t you please?
I’m just a carousel of wild winds
Who’ll bring you to your knees!
Hell, yeah!

Take a bow, take a bow,
Take a bow before your god…

I might just pardon you
If you’ve got magic up your sleeve!
If you’re swift and resourceful you could outrun me!
I always love a challenge!
I always love a game…
The question on your mind
Is in regards to my first name,
Right?

My name is Katrina, the witch of the skies,
A sorceress whose debut dance makes everyone die,
I know it’s not what you wanted!
(But I’m selfish through and through),
So, c’mon and make me happy!
Whether you’re ready or not…”
Rebecca McNutt, Vaporwave Sixtyten

James Caskey
“Many people, after spending a long weekend being stealthily seduced by this grand dame of the South, mistakenly think that they have gotten to know her: they believe (in error) that after a long stroll amongst the rustling palmettoes and gas lamps, a couple of sumptuous meals, and a tour or two, that they have discovered everything there is to know about this seemingly genteel, elegant city. But like any great seductress, Charleston presents a careful veneer of half-truths and outright fabrications, and it lets you, the intended conquest, fill in many of the blanks. Seduction, after all, is not true love, nor is it a gentle act. She whispers stories spun from sugar about pirates and patriots and rebels, about plantations and traditions and manners and yes, even ghosts; but the entire time she is guarded about the real story. Few tourists ever hear the truth, because at the dark heart of Charleston is a winding tale of violence, tragedy and, most of all, sin.”
James Caskey, Charleston's Ghosts: Hauntings in the Holy City

Richard Ford
“Fincher was the kind of Southerner who will try to address you through a web of deep and antic southernness, and who assumes every body in earshot knows all about his parents and history and wants to hear an update about them at every opportunity. He looks young, but still manages to act 65.”
Richard Ford, The Sportswriter

Nancy B. Brewer
“He was wearing a little bag of “Mojo” around his neck.”
Nancy B. Brewer, Carolina Rain

James Caskey
“I began to doubt that I would ever know the truth of what transpired, or who those people really were. But all that changed one rainy August afternoon, when I was surprised by a dead man who had answers.”
James Caskey, Haunted Savannah: America's Most Spectral City

Flannery O'Connor
“The Liberal approach is that man has never fallen, never incurred guilt, and is ultimately perfectible by his own efforts. Therefore, evil in this light is a problem of better housing, sanitation, health, etc. and all mysteries will eventually be cleared up.”
Flannery O'Connor, The Habit of Being: Letters of Flannery O'Connor

Jack Butler
“That's the trouble with innocents. They aren't innocent of doing, just of knowing what they're doing.”
Jack Butler, Jujitsu for Christ

Daven Anderson
“You said you left Mississippi in 1854," Ron says. He turns to Mamuwalde and asks "Were you a runaway slave?"

"Not at all," Cindy Lou answers. "Daddy freed him."

Ron's jaw almost hits the floor. His wine glass does.”
Daven Anderson, Vampire Syndrome

Nancy B. Brewer
“She turned her painted blue eyes toward the assistant and said something in French before she left.”
Nancy B. Brewer, Carolina Rain

Olive Ann Burns
“Jesus said take up your cross and follow Me, but He didn't ast us to go out and nail ourselves to a board.”
Olive Ann Burns

James Villas
“OJ, milk, butter, eggs, half a roll of country sausage, a cantaloupe, Kroger's whole-grain bread, a can of French Market chicory coffee, some blackberry preserves- just the right makings of a good Southern breakfast for just my kind of man. No matter that breakfast has always been my favorite meal and that this would be another major test of my willpower.
'Bout the time I'd started frying a big patty of sausage for him, I noticed a few red potatoes in a basket, peeled and cut one up, and tossed the cubes in the same large cast-iron skillet for hashed browns. At first I'd thought of doing soft-scrambled eggs for us both, but while I was beating four eggs with a little milk as quietly as possible, I remembered seeing a package of Jack cheese in the door of the fridge, as well as a couple of jalapeños on the windowsill, and suddenly decided to make my guy a spicy cheese omelette to really impress him.”
James Villas, Hungry for Happiness

Helen Ellis
“I looked so preppy you'd guess my tramp stamp was a monogram”
Helen Ellis, Southern Lady Code

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