Southern Writers Quotes

Quotes tagged as "southern-writers" Showing 1-30 of 71
Flannery O'Connor
“Anybody who has survived his childhood has enough information about life to last him the rest of his days.”
Flannery O'Connor, Mystery and Manners: Occasional Prose

Flannery O'Connor
“Whenever I’m asked why Southern writers particularly have a penchant for writing about freaks, I say it is because we are still able to recognize one.”
Flannery O'Connor

Lillian Hellman
“Well, there are people who eat the earth and eat all the people on it like in the Bible with the locusts. Then there are people who stand around and watch them eat it. (Softly) Sometimes I think it ain't right to stand and watch them do it.”
Lillian Hellman, The Little Foxes

Nancy B. Brewer
“{Summertime she speaks of winter, she eats ham, but speaks of beef, got a good man but, flirts with another. She might as well go to hell, cause she ain't gonna be happy in heaven either!}”
Nancy B. Brewer

Brenda Sutton Rose
“My mother’s dress bears the stains of her life:
blueberries, blood, bleach,
and breast milk;
She cradles in her arms a lifetime
of love and sorrow;
Its brilliance nearly blinds me.”
Brenda Sutton Rose

Miranda Parker
“If I weren't so screwed up, I would've sold my soul a long time ago for a handsome man who made me feel pretty or who could at least treat me to a Millionaire's Martini. Instead I lingered over a watered down Sparkling Apple and felt sorry about what I was about to do to the blue-eyed bartender standing in front of me. Although I shouldn’t, after all, I am a bail recovery agent. It's my job to get my skip, no matter the cost.If I weren't so screwed up, I would've sold my soul a long time ago for a handsome man who made me feel pretty or who could at least treat me to a Millionaire's Martini. Instead I lingered over a watered down Sparkling Apple and felt sorry about what I was about to do to the blue-eyed bartender standing in front of me. Although I shouldn't, after all, I am a bail recovery agent. It's my job to get my skip, no matter the cost. Yet, I had been wondering lately. What was this job costing me? Yet, I had been wondering lately. What was this job costing me?”
Miranda Parker, A Good Excuse to Be Bad

James Caskey
“Many people, after spending a long weekend being stealthily seduced by this grand dame of the South, mistakenly think that they have gotten to know her: they believe (in error) that after a long stroll amongst the rustling palmettoes and gas lamps, a couple of sumptuous meals, and a tour or two, that they have discovered everything there is to know about this seemingly genteel, elegant city. But like any great seductress, Charleston presents a careful veneer of half-truths and outright fabrications, and it lets you, the intended conquest, fill in many of the blanks. Seduction, after all, is not true love, nor is it a gentle act. She whispers stories spun from sugar about pirates and patriots and rebels, about plantations and traditions and manners and yes, even ghosts; but the entire time she is guarded about the real story. Few tourists ever hear the truth, because at the dark heart of Charleston is a winding tale of violence, tragedy and, most of all, sin.”
James Caskey, Charleston's Ghosts: Hauntings in the Holy City

Brenda Sutton Rose
“Are you aware that Jesus Christ can spell? I get so tired of you spelling every slang and cuss word that crosses your mind, as though you are pulling one over on the Lord.”
Brenda Sutton Rose, Dogwood Blues

Patricia Hickman
“Humans need each other for equilibrium and support. But writers must pull aside to take a quiet walk alone, not just for the sake of serenity but to hear the Voice inside. That is how the storyteller connects with with others--listen, write, share.”
Patricia Hickman, The Pirate Queen

Patricia Hickman
“Because of sorrow, my awareness of life's pulse is strongly detectable. It is syncopation while I journey, a lap of ocean in the eyes of every person I meet. This awareness informs the flesh of my stories. Grief has been an odd companion, at first a terror, but now I am all the better having accepted it for its intrinsic worth.”
Patricia Hickman, The Pirate Queen

Brenda Sutton Rose
“The truth had lacerated him to the bone, had punctured his heart, and had ripped through his soul. The truth had slain him and tended to his wounds. The truth had hated him and loved him. The truth had opened his eyes to his own faults.”
Brenda Sutton Rose, Dogwood Blues

Flannery O'Connor
“The woods are full of regional writers, and it is the great horror of every serious Southern writer that he will become one of them.”
Flannery O'Connor, Mystery and Manners: Occasional Prose

Patricia Hickman
“Facing the sagging middle when writing a novel, while inevitable, may be
overcome by pre-planning. I divide my collection of proposed scenes into three acts, each scene inciting tension that builds toward the final crisis in Act Three. If by Act Two the emotional river isn't spilling over the banks, I reassess the plot so that once the writing is flowing I don't slide into a dry creek. The central character should be struggling to navigate life well into the end of Act One, even if her fiercest antagonist is only from within.”
Patricia Hickman, The Pirate Queen

Patricia Hickman
“While writing the first draft is an exercise in shutting down all of the things we think we know so that the story features come tumbling out, the revision is the end of the joy ride. We pull on the gloves and sort of poke around inside the body. Is that a tumor? Will that limb need amputation? I nearly second-guessed myself into heart failure while learning to self-edit.”
Patricia Hickman, The Pirate Queen

James Caskey
“I began to doubt that I would ever know the truth of what transpired, or who those people really were. But all that changed one rainy August afternoon, when I was surprised by a dead man who had answers.”
James Caskey, Haunted Savannah: America's Most Spectral City

Christina M. Ward
“I do not want to live
in a world without butterflies.
A place where they only exist
in oil on canvas or silver trinkets on a chain,
in language, legends we pass to the next
generation of memory-keepers,
a place where tiny ghosts have painted wings.”
Christina M. Ward, organic

Susan M. Boyer
“Our souls are salt-water cured. - Liz Talbot, Lowcountry Boil.”
Susan M. Boyer, Lowcountry Boil

Patricia Hickman
“The central character is an incomplete package of yearning that takes the length of the novel to complete. Completion, though, is not to be confused with perfection.”
Patricia Hickman, The Pirate Queen

Patricia Hickman
“I started out hoping to remind people at some point in the novel that we should be loving and kind. But then the theme usurped my life, spilling over into my novels until love was no longer a small voice, but now my purpose as a writer.”
Patricia Hickman, The Pirate Queen

Christina M. Ward
“I made your favorite." Nannie says, her elegant hand trembles,
so subtle it hides behind a smile. She listens
carefully,
responds quickly, eases the baked macaroni from the oven.
We wash our hands with bars of smooth soap in delicate shapes.
We are quiet, careful not to touch the glass of doors.

We do not leave fingerprints here.”
Christina M. Ward

Christina M. Ward
“Golden framed and heavy, the painting.
Ocean waves curled in suspended time,
white-lipped and silent beneath brush-stroked blues
of sky. Gulls are captured there, mid-flight, fishing moments stolen in time, they soar without moving.”
Christina M. Ward, organic

Christina M. Ward
“Ready, the boy climbs the ladder,
makes his way to the edge
and full of faith-- he leaps--
expecting flight,
finding hot tears
in a red cape
that doesn't work.”
Christina M. Ward, organic

Christina M. Ward
“Nestled... In the dappled Spring sunlight
peeking through oaks, maples, and Tulip poplar
is a country house with pale-yellow siding.
Across a corner of the weathered,
wooden-slatted front porch, a vine lazily
stretches to find a spot in the sun.”
Christina M. Ward, organic

Christina M. Ward
“Arising there, a china cabinet, its gifts enclosed in a hug.
Atop a pedestal table, hand-sanded and love-stained,
Mom's Christmas cactus trails and cascades in forest greens
awaiting pink-winged petals alighting in season, a crescendo of bloom framed an autumn-light meandering through remembrance like a dream.”
Christina M. Ward, organic

Christina M. Ward
“Mamaw's spirit lingers there, her high-bubbled laugh
carrying on like a song, her quiet dignity still holding
together the air that holds up this house.”
Christina M. Ward, organic

Christina M. Ward
“paint the pony I will ride
soft hues that gather childhood
and thrust forward, to nowhere

back again, we turn
to plunking calliope tune
loud, round notes, we lift higher

hollowed ponies with painted ribbons
between our thighs,
laughter in her eyes

-- from 'Paint the Dancing Pony' (a poem)”
Christina M. Ward, organic

Christina M. Ward
“I do not want to live
in a world without butterflies.
Without the intricate eyes and velvety wings,
graceful splashes of color dancing on the breeze.
Airy, delicate keepers of hope.
Metamorphic symbols of change, growth, maturation.

... I do not want this world
without the butterflies.
I could not bear the wailing
of flowers.

--from 'A World Without Butterflies' (a poem)”
Christina M. Ward, organic

Christina M. Ward
“Butterflies and moths
to the flame
--- and we are the flame”
Christina M. Ward, organic

Ren French
“Frank: Dude. Bro. I'm not wearing underwear. Is it nippley outside?”
Ren French, Creating a Concierge

Ren French
“Many people have asked me, "Why title your book Creating a Concierge?" There is no correct answer. Call it creation, evolution, or chance, but ultimately it's what felt right.”
Ren French, Creating a Concierge

« previous 1 3