Saving Quotes

Quotes tagged as "saving" Showing 1-30 of 142
“Rocks in my path? I keep them all. With them I shall build my castle.”
Nemo Nox

James Patterson
“Hello, Max," he said quietly, searching my face. "How do you feel?"

Which was a ten on the "imbecilic question" scale of one to ten.

Why, I feel fine, Jeb," I said brightly. "How about you?"

Any nausea? Headache?"

Yep. And it's standing here talking to me.”
James Patterson

Maggie Stiefvater
“I'm sorry no one saved you.”
Maggie Stiefvater, The Dream Thieves

“Suddenly I grasped what was happening- they were all trying to save me.
I never thought I was worth saving.”
Albert Borris, Crash Into Me

Eduardo Galeano
“I am not particularly interested in
saving time; I prefer to enjoy it.”
Eduardo Hughes Galeano

Leigh Bardugo
“Speak, she begged silently. Give me a reason to stay. For all his selfishness and cruelty, Kaz was still the boy who had saved her. She wanted to believe he was worth saving, too.”
Leigh Bardugo, Six of Crows

Stephen Douglass
“I’M LOSING FAITH IN MY FAVORITE COUNTRY

Throughout my life, the United States has been my favorite country, save and except for Canada, where I was born, raised, educated, and still live for six months each year. As a child growing up in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, I aggressively bought and saved baseball cards of American and National League players, spent hours watching snowy images of American baseball and football games on black and white television and longed for the day when I could travel to that great country. Every Saturday afternoon, me and the boys would pay twelve cents to go the show and watch U.S. made movies, and particularly, the Superman serial. Then I got my chance. My father, who worked for B.F. Goodrich, took my brother and me to watch the Cleveland Indians play baseball in the Mistake on the Lake in Cleveland. At last I had made it to the big time. I thought it was an amazing stadium and it was certainly not a mistake. Amazingly, the Americans thought we were Americans.

I loved the United States, and everything about the country: its people, its movies, its comic books, its sports, and a great deal more. The country was alive and growing. No, exploding. It was the golden age of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. The American dream was alive and well, but demanded hard work, honesty, and frugality. Everyone understood that. Even the politicians.

Then everything changed.

Partly because of its proximity to the United States and a shared heritage, Canadians also aspired to what was commonly referred to as the American dream. I fall neatly into that category. For as long as I can remember I wanted a better life, but because I was born with a cardboard spoon in my mouth, and wasn’t a member of the golden gene club, I knew I would have to make it the old fashioned way: work hard and save. After university graduation I spent the first half of my career working for the two largest oil companies in the world: Exxon and Royal Dutch Shell. The second half was spent with one of the smallest oil companies in the world: my own.

Then I sold my company and retired into obscurity. In my case obscurity was spending summers in our cottage on Lake Rosseau in Muskoka, Ontario, and winters in our home in Port St. Lucie, Florida. My wife, Ann, and I, (and our three sons when they can find the time), have been enjoying that “obscurity” for a long time. During that long time we have been fortunate to meet and befriend a large number of Americans, many from Tom Brokaw’s “Greatest Generation.” One was a military policeman in Tokyo in 1945. After a very successful business carer in the U.S. he’s retired and living the dream. Another American friend, also a member of the “Greatest Generation”, survived The Battle of the Bulge and lived to drink Hitler’s booze at Berchtesgaden in 1945. He too is happily retired and living the dream. Both of these individuals got to where they are by working hard, saving, and living within their means. Both also remember when their Federal Government did the same thing.

One of my younger American friends recently sent me a You Tube video, featuring an impassioned speech by Marco Rubio, Republican senator from Florida. In the speech, Rubio blasts the spending habits of his Federal Government and deeply laments his country’s future. He is outraged that the U.S. Government spends three hundred billion dollars, each and every month. He is even more outraged that one hundred and twenty billion of that three hundred billion dollars is borrowed. In other words, Rubio states that for every dollar the U.S. Government spends, forty cents is borrowed. I don’t blame him for being upset. If I had run my business using that arithmetic, I would be in the soup kitchens. If individual American families had applied that arithmetic to their finances, none of them would be in a position to pay a thin dime of taxes.”
Stephen Douglass

Chuck Palahniuk
“And it's funny how when somebody saves you, the first thing you want to do is save other people. All other people. Everybody. The kid never knew the man's name. But he never forgot that smile. "Hero" isn't the first word, but it's the first word that comes to mind.”
Chuck Palahniuk, Choke

“I look coolly in to the blue eyes of the person who is now my greatest opponent, the person who would keep me alive at his own expense. And I promise myself I will defeat his plan.”
Suzanne Collins, Catching Fire

Vera Nazarian
“It does not take a great supernatural heroine or magical hero to save the world.

We all save it every day, and we all destroy it -- in our own small ways -- by every choice we make and every tiniest action resulting from that choice.

The next time you feel useless and impotent, remember what you are in fact doing in this very moment. And then observe your tiny, seemingly meaningless acts and choices coalesce and cascade together into a powerful positive whole.

The world -- if it could -- will thank you for it.

And if it does not... well, a true heroine or hero does not require it.”
Vera Nazarian

Lucy Christopher
“Nobody's bought this land. And no one's going to want it either. It's dying land, lonely land."
"Like me, then," I said.
"Yes, like you." You chewed the corner of your lip. "You both need saving.”
Lucy Christopher

Emme Rollins
“You think he’s perfect and he’s safe and, in your head, he can do anything... but he can’t save you, Sara... and I can’t save you either.”
Emme Rollins, Dear Rockstar

Dan Wells
“You're a hero,' Mom repeated, squeezing my hand and kissing my forehead. 'You saved six lives in that house! Six! Sure, one of them was a creep,' she looked at Lauren, 'but that's what makes it so good. "Love thine enemies."'
Lauren smiled at me. 'And don't worry about Curt,' she said. 'We are so broken up.'
'Six lives,' Mom repeated.
But I had been trying to save seven.”
Dan Wells, Mr. Monster

Meg Cabot
“It's only in fairy tales that princesses can afford to wait for the handsome prince to save them. In real life, they have to bust out of their own coffins and do the saving themselves.”
Meg Cabot, Abandon

Henry Chancellor
“A little reckless bravery may end up saving your life.”
Henry Chancellor, The Forgotten Echo

Charles Stross
“Bob loses saving throw vs. shiny with a penalty of -5. Bob takes 2d8 damage to the credit card.”
Charles Stross, The Fuller Memorandum

Alyson Noel
“And just as I start to move past him, my hip accidentally rubs against his, and his face is so close, and his eyes so deep, that I can't help but lift my fingers to his smooth, sculptured cheek. Then without even thinking, I close my eyes, lean in, and kiss him.”
Alyson Noel, Saving Zoë

Henry David Thoreau
“Some of you, we all know, are poor, find it hard to live, are sometimes, as it were, gasping for breath. I have no doubt that some of you who read this book are unable to pay for all the dinners which you have actually eaten, or for the coats and shoes which are fast wearing or are already worn out, and have come to this page to spend borrowed or stolen time, robbing your creditors of an hour. It is very evident what mean and sneaking lives many of you live, for my sight has been whetted by experience; always on the limits, trying to get into business and trying to get out of debt, a very ancient slough, called by the Latins aes alienum, another's brass, for some of their coins were made of brass; still living, and dying, and buried by this other's brass; always promising to pay, promising to pay, tomorrow, and dying today, insolvent; seeking to curry favor, to get custom, by how many modes, only not state-prison offences; lying, flattering, voting, contracting yourselves into a nutshell of civility or dilating into an atmosphere of thin and vaporous generosity, that you may persuade your neighbor to let you make his shoes, or his hat, or his coat, or his carriage, or import his groceries for him; making yourselves sick, that you may lay up something against a sick day, something to be tucked away in an old chest, or in a stocking behind the plastering, or, more safely, in the brick bank; no matter where, no matter how much or how little.”
Henry David Thoreau, Walden

Beth Revis
“How ironic it would be, to die at his hands while trying to save him, when he first came to me because he was trying to save me.”
Beth Revis, The Body Electric

Betty  Smith
“May I have this damaged bunch for two cents? Speak strongly and it shall be yours for two cents. That is a saved penny that you put in the star bank...Suffer the cold for an hour. Put a shawl around you. Sai, I am cold because I am saving to buy land. That hour will save you three cents' worth of coal... When you are alone at night, do not light the lamp. Sit in the darkness and dream awhile. Reckon out how much oil you saved and put its value in pennies in the bank. The money will grow. Someday there will be fifty dollars and somewhere on this long island is a piece of land that you may buy for that money.”
Betty Smith, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn

John Steinbeck
“She planted that terror of debt so deeply in her children that even now, in a changed economic pattern where indebtedness is a part of living, I become restless when a bill is two days overdue. Olive never accepted the time-payment plan when it became popular. A thing bought on time was a thing you did not own and for which you were in debt. She saved for things she wanted, and this meant that the neighbours had new gadgets as much as two years before we did.”
John Steinbeck, East of Eden

Toba Beta
“Smartass Disciple: Master, can you trust this bank to keep your money safe?
Master of Stupidity: Well, I can put a bit less distrust on this bank than others.”
Toba Beta, Master of Stupidity

Leigh Bardugo
“Cautiously, she let her knuckles brush against his, a slight weight, a bird’s feather. He stiffened, but he didn’t pull away.

“I’m not ready to give up on this city, Kaz. I think it’s worth saving.” I think you’re worth saving.
Leigh Bardugo, Crooked Kingdom

Casey McQuiston
“She was beautiful like a city you always wanted to go to, like how you wait years and years for the right time, and then as soon as you get there, you have to taste everything and touch everything and learn every street by name. I felt like I knew her. She reminded me who I was. She had soft lips and green eyes and a body that wouldn't quit. Hair like you wouldn't believe. Stubborn, sharp as a knife. And I never, ever wanted a person to save me until she did.”
Casey McQuiston, One Last Stop

Anath Lee Wales
“effective saving can lead to a successful wealth achievement”
Anath Lee Wales, your life can be changed.: the true guide to become a change maker!

W.E.B. Du Bois
“Morally and practically, the Freedmen’s Bank was part of the Freedmen’s Bureau, although it had no legal connection with it. With the prestige of the government back of it, and a directing board of unusual respectability and national reputation, this banking institution had made a remarkable start in the development of that thrift among black folk which slavery had kept them from knowing. Then in one sad day came the crash,—all the hard-earned dollars of the freedmen disappeared; but that was the least of the loss,—all the faith in saving went too, and much of the faith in men; and that was a loss that a Nation which to-day sneers at Negro shiftlessness has never yet made good. Not even ten additional years of slavery could have done so much to throttle the thrift of the freedmen as the mismanagement and bankruptcy of the series of savings banks chartered by the Nation for their especial aid.”
W.E.B. Du Bois, The Souls of Black Folk

Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“Saving money is for fools. The wise achieve the very same or even better result by simply not wasting money.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana

Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“Instead of buying a Mercedes, you can buy a Toyota; and then use the extra money that you would have spent every month, for about five years, on the installment, fuel, and insurance to buy shares in the company that owns Mercedes … or the one that owns Rolls Royce.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana

Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“The saving of money is usually the delaying of the wasting of money.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana

Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“Time and money are almost always saved to be wasted.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana

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