Property Quotes

Quotes tagged as "property" Showing 1-30 of 176
Winston S. Churchill
“How dreadful are the curses which Mohammedanism lays on its votaries! Besides the fanatical frenzy, which is as dangerous in a man as hydrophobia in a dog, there is this fearful fatalistic apathy. The effects are apparent in many countries. Improvident habits, slovenly systems of agriculture, sluggish methods of commerce, and insecurity of property exist wherever the followers of the Prophet rule or live. A degraded sensualism deprives this life of its grace and refinement; the next of its dignity and sanctity. The fact that in Mohammedan law every woman must belong to some man as his absolute property – either as a child, a wife, or a concubine – must delay the final extinction of slavery until the faith of Islam has ceased to be a great power among men. Thousands become the brave and loyal soldiers of the faith: all know how to die but the influence of the religion paralyses the social development of those who follow it. No stronger retrograde force exists in the world. Far from being moribund, Mohammedanism is a militant and proselytizing faith. It has already spread throughout Central Africa, raising fearless warriors at every step; and were it not that Christianity is sheltered in the strong arms of science, the science against which it had vainly struggled, the civilisation of modern Europe might fall, as fell the civilisation of ancient Rome.”
Winston Churchill, The River War

Vera Nazarian
“Love is made up of three unconditional properties in equal measure:

1. Acceptance
2. Understanding
3. Appreciation

Remove any one of the three and the triangle falls apart.

Which, by the way, is something highly inadvisable. Think about it — do you really want to live in a world of only two dimensions?

So, for the love of a triangle, please keep love whole.”
Vera Nazarian, The Perpetual Calendar of Inspiration

Cormac McCarthy
“At one time in the world there were woods that no one owned”
Cormac McCarthy, Child of God

Ralph Waldo Emerson
“Men have looked away from themselves and at things so long that they have come to esteem the religious, learned and civil institutions as guards of property, and they deprecate assaults on these, because they feel them to be assaults on property. They measure their esteem of each other by what each has, and not by what each is.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Self-Reliance

Murray N. Rothbard
“Libertarianism holds that the only proper role of violence is to defend person and property against violence, that any use of violence that goes beyond such just defense is itself aggressive, unjust, and criminal”
Murray N. Rothbard

Gary L. Francione
“All sentient beings should have at least one right—the right not to be treated as property”
GaryLFrancione

James Joyce
“What's yours is mine and what's mine is my own.”
James Joyce, Ulysses

Elizabeth Gaskell
“In the first place, Cranford is in possession of the Amazons; all the holders of houses above a certain rent are women. If a married couple come to settle in the town, somehow the gentleman disappears; he is either fairly frightened to death by being the only man in the Cranford parties, or he is accounted for by being with his regiment, his hip, or closely engaged in business all the week in the great neighbouring commercial town of Drumble, distant only twenty miles on a railroad. In short, whatever does become of the gentlemen, they are not at Cranford.”
Elizabeth Gaskell, Cranford

James Madison
“As a man is said to have a right to his property, he may be equally said to have a property in his rights.”
James Madison

Ludwig von Mises
“Repression by brute force is always a confession of the inability to make use of the better weapons of the intellect—better because they alone give promise of final success.”
Ludwig von Mises, Liberalism: The Classical Tradition

Ludwig von Mises
“If one prevents a man from working for the good of society while at the same time providing for the satisfaction of his own needs, then only one way remains open to him: to make himself richer and others poorer by the violent oppression and spoliation of his fellow men.”
Ludwig von Mises, Liberalism: The Classical Tradition

Ludwig von Mises
“Against what is stupid, nonsensical, erroneous, and evil, [classical] liberalism fights with the weapons of the mind, and not with brute force and repression.”
Ludwig von Mises, Liberalism: The Classical Tradition

G.K. Chesterton
“A pickpocket is obviously a champion of private enterprise. But it would perhaps be an exaggeration to say that a pickpocket is a champion of private property. The point about Capitalism and Commercialism, as conducted of late, is that they have really preached the extension of business rather than the preservation of belongings; and have at best tried to disguise the pickpocket with some of the virtues of the pirate.”
G.K. Chesterton, The Outline of Sanity

Vera Nazarian
“The pyramid shape is said to hold many secrets and amazing properties. One of them is a sense of wonder.”
Vera Nazarian

Ludwig von Mises
“In a battle between force and an idea, the latter always prevails.”
Ludwig von Mises, Liberalism: The Classical Tradition

Henry David Thoreau
“Our houses are such unwieldy property that we are often imprisoned rather than housed in them.”
Henry David Thoreau, Walden

Ludwig von Mises
“It is labor alone that is productive: it creates wealth and therewith lays the outward foundations for the inward flowering of man.”
Ludwig von Mises, Liberalism: The Classical Tradition

“I knew, as every peasant does, that land can never be truly owned. We are the keepers of the soil, the curators of trees.”
Lisa St. Aubin de Teran, The Palace the Palace

Cory Doctorow
“my problem isn’t piracy, it’s obscurity”
Cory Doctorow, Makers

Louisa May Alcott
“I've been so bothered with my property, that I'm tired of it, and don't mean to save up any more, but give it away as I go along, and then nobody will envy me, or want to steal it, and I shan't be suspecting folks and worrying about my old cash.”
Louisa May Alcott, Little Men

John Berger
“We are accused of being obsessed by property. The truth is the other way round. It is the society and culture in question which is so obsessed. Yet to an obsessive his obsession always seems to be of the nature of things and so is not recognized for what it is. The relation between property and art in European culture appears natural to that culture, and consequently if somebody demonstrates the extent of the property interest in a given cultural field, it is said to be a demonstration of his obsession. And this allows the Cultural Establishment to project for a little longer its false rationalized image of itself.”
John Berger

“No man's life, liberty or property are safe while the legislature is in session.”
Gideon Tucker

Antonia Fraser
“It was a fact generally acknowledged by all but the most contumacious spirits at the beginning of the seventeenth century that woman was the weaker vessel; weaker than man, that is. ... That was the way God had arranged Creation, sanctified in the words of the Apostle. ... Under the common law of England at the accession of King James I, no female had any rights at all (if some were allowed by custom). As an unmarried woman her rights were swallowed up in her father's, and she was his to dispose of in marriage at will. Once she was married her property became absolutely that of her husband. What of those who did not marry? Common law met that problem blandly by not recognizing it. In the words of The Lawes Resolutions [the leading 17th century compendium on women's legal status]: 'All of them are understood either married or to be married.' In 1603 England, in short, still lived in a world governed by feudal law, where a wife passed from the guardianship of her father to her husband; her husband also stood in relation to her as a feudal lord.”
Antonia Fraser, The Weaker Vessel

Ariel Gore
“Settling other people's land is an American tradition.”
Ariel Gore, Atlas of the Human Heart

Ursula K. Le Guin
“When in the Land of Property think like a propertarian. Dress like one, eat like one, act like one, be one.”
Ursula K. Le Guin, The Dispossessed

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
“A human being needs only a small plot of ground on which to be happy, and even less to lie beneath.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther and Selected Writings

John Steinbeck
“That's what makes it ours-being born on it, working on it, dying on it. That makes ownership, not a paper with numbers on it.”
John Steinbeck, The Grapes of Wrath

“Given an area of law that legislators were happy to hand over to the affected industries and a technology that was both unfamiliar and threatening, the prospects for legislative insight were poor. Lawmakers were assured by lobbyists
a) that this was business as usual, that no dramatic changes were being made by the Green or White papers; or
b) that the technology presented a terrible menace to the American cultural industries, but that prompt and statesmanlike action would save the day; or
c) that layers of new property rights, new private enforcers of those rights, and technological control and surveillance measures were all needed in order to benefit consumers, who would now be able to “purchase culture by the sip rather than by the glass” in a pervasively monitored digital environment.
In practice, somewhat confusingly, these three arguments would often be combined. Legislators’ statements seemed to suggest that this was a routine Armageddon in which firm, decisive statesmanship was needed to preserve the digital status quo in a profoundly transformative and proconsumer way. Reading the congressional debates was likely to give one conceptual whiplash.
To make things worse, the press was—in 1995, at least—clueless about these issues. It was not that the newspapers were ignoring the Internet. They were paying attention—obsessive attention in some cases. But as far as the mainstream press was concerned, the story line on the Internet was sex: pornography, online predation, more pornography. The lowbrow press stopped there. To be fair, the highbrow press was also interested in Internet legal issues (the regulation of pornography, the regulation of online predation) and constitutional questions (the First Amendment protection of Internet pornography). Reporters were also asking questions about the social effect of the network (including, among other things, the threats posed by pornography and online predators).”
James Boyle, The Public Domain: Enclosing the Commons of the Mind

Hilaire Belloc
“If we do not restore the Institution of Property we cannot escape restoring the Institution of Slavery; there is no third course.”
Hilaire Belloc, The Servile State

Élisée Reclus
“Un fait capital domine toute la civilisation moderne, le fait que la propriété d'un seul peut s'accroître indéfiniment, et même, en vertu du consentement presque universel, embrasser le monde entier.”
Élisée Reclus

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