Max Stirner


Born
in Bayreuth, Germany
October 25, 1806

Died
June 26, 1856

Genre

Influences


Johann Kaspar Schmidt, better known as Max Stirner (the nom de plume he adopted from a schoolyard nickname he had acquired as a child because of his high brow, in German 'Stirn'), was a German philosopher, who ranks as one of the literary grandfathers of nihilism, existentialism, post-modernism and anarchism, especially of individualist anarchism. Stirner's main work is "The Ego and Its Own", also known as "The Ego and His Own" ("Der Einzige und sein Eigentum" in German, which translates literally as "The Only One and his Property"). This work was first published in 1844 in Leipzig, and has since appeared in numerous editions and translations.

Average rating: 4.06 · 1,920 ratings · 132 reviews · 29 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Ego and Its Own

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4.09 avg rating — 1,718 ratings — published 1844 — 136 editions
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The False Principle of Our ...

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3.67 avg rating — 103 ratings — published 1942 — 6 editions
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Stirner's Critics

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3.98 avg rating — 41 ratings — published 2013 — 2 editions
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Escritos menores

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3.92 avg rating — 12 ratings — published 1976 — 6 editions
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Parerga, Kritiken, Repliken

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1986
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La società degli straccioni...

2.33 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2013
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Art and Religion

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liked it 3.00 avg rating — 2 ratings
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Pequena Antologia Do Anarqu...

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it was ok 2.00 avg rating — 3 ratings
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Der Einzige Und Sein Eigentum

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating3 editions
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Oeuvres complètes : L'uniqu...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating2 editions
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More books by Max Stirner…
“Whoever will be free must make himself free. Freedom is no fairy gift to fall into a man's lap. What is freedom? To have the will to be responsible for one's self.”
Max Stirner

“The state calls its own violence law, but that of the individual, crime.”
Max Stirner

“Where the world comes in my way—and it comes in my way everywhere—I consume it to quiet the hunger of my egoism. For me you are nothing but—my food, even as I too am fed upon and turned to use by you. We have only one relation to each other, that of usableness, of utility, of use. We owe each other nothing, for what I seem to owe you I owe at most to myself. If I show you a cheery air in order to cheer you likewise, then your cheeriness is of consequence to me, and my air serves my wish; to a thousand others, whom I do not aim to cheer, I do not show it.”
Max Stirner, The Ego and Its Own