Nursing Quotes

Quotes tagged as "nursing" (showing 1-30 of 43)
Abraham Lincoln
“Honor to the soldier and sailor everywhere, who bravely bears his country's cause. Honor, also, to the citizen who cares for his brother in the field and serves, as he best can, the same cause.”
Abraham Lincoln

Wendell Berry
“I took her into bed with me and propped myself up with pillows against the headboard to let her nurse. As she nursed and the milk came, she began a little low contented sort of singing. I would feel milk and love flowing from me to her as once it had flowed to me. It emptied me. As the baby fed, I seemed slowly to grow empty of myself, as if in the presence of that long flow of love even grief could not stand.”
Wendell Berry, Hannah Coulter

Marcus Sedgwick
“I'm just a girl in a nurse's uniform, but that doesn't mean I know how to save these men, and they- they are men in uniforms, but that doesn't mean they know how to die.”
Marcus Sedgwick, The Foreshadowing

Tilda Shalof
“The hospital will never be healthy for patients if it's not a healthy environment for nurses, where their voices are heard and where they can care for their patients and use the full extent of their knowledge, abilities, and skills. After all, hospitals today have become one big intensive care unit: all patients need intensive caring.”
Tilda Shalof

Monica Dickens
“Nursing is a kind of mania; a fever in the blood; an incurable disease which, once contracted, cannot be got out of the system. If it was not like that, there would be no hospital nurses, for compared dispassionately with other professions, the hours are long, the work hard, and the pay inadequate to the amount of concentrated energy required.
A nurse, however, does not view her profession dispassionately. It is too much a part of her.”
Monica Dickens

Cassie Brode
“Obtaining a certificate in nursing assistant trains students to provide quality care to residents in nursing homes.”
Cassie Brode, Aniyah Certified Nursing Assistant

Erica Eisdorfer
“...For having a baby's sweet face so close to your own, for so long a time as it takes to nurse 'em, is a great tonic for a sad soul.”
Erica Eisdorfer, The Wet Nurse's Tale

Kamand Kojouri
“What is life?
Life is living in this moment,
experiencing and experimenting
but experience isn’t life.
Life is reflecting and meditating
but reflection isn’t life.
Life is helping and guiding
but philanthropy isn’t life.
Life is eating and drinking
but food isn’t life.
Life is reading and dancing
but art isn’t life.
Life is kissing and pleasuring
but sex isn’t life.
Life is winning and losing
but competition isn’t life.
Life is loving and caring
but love isn’t life.
Life is birthing and nurturing
but children aren’t life.
Life is letting go and surrendering
but death isn’t life.
Life is all these things
but all these things aren’t life.
Life is
always more.”
Kamand Kojouri

“Knowing someone's story helps to make the patient more real, and it makes the job more personal. The shared narratives of others' lives incorporate and become stories about us. I feel myself to be a part of a stranger's story, when it is shared with me, and passing it on feels like my sharing of a parable we've all heard- we know the plot, even the climax and the ending. Only the names have changed, or the costumes, or the settings, but the story is the same and is this: we are all vulnerable; we are all a little bit crazy; we are all funny, entertaining, delicate, bold, horrible, and fantastic. We are all, in our unique and individual ways, as equally and universally fucked up as the next person. Every one of us. Theres comfort in knowing this.”
Pamela Baker

“Whether women work in the care sector because the wages are low or whether wages are low because women work there is a question that cannot be answered. But we know that a big reason for economic inequality is that women to a much greater extent work with care.”
Katrine Marçal, Who Cooked Adam Smith's Dinner?: A Story About Women and Economics

Emma Donoghue
“In fact the English nurses had spent much of their time stuffing mattresses, stirring gruel, and standing at washtubs, but Lib didn't want the nun to mistake her for an ignorant menial. That was what nobody understood: saving lives often came down to getting a latrine pipe unplugged.”
Emma Donoghue, The Wonder

Florence Nightingale
“The most important pratical lesson that can be given to nurses is to teach them what to observe-how to observe-what symptoms indicate improvement-what the reverse-which are of importance-which are of none-which are the evidence of neglect-and of what kind of neglect.”
Florence Nightingale, Notes on Nursing: What It Is, and What It Is Not

Vera Brittain
“Four impressionable years spent in a number of very different hospitals convinced me once for all that nursing, if it is to be done efficiently, requires, more than any other occupation, abundant leisure in colorful surroundings, sufficient money to spend on amusements, agreeable food to re-establish the energy expended, and the removal of anxiety about illness and old age; yet of all skilled professions, it is still the least vitalised by these advantages, still the most oppressed by unnecessary worries, cruelties, hardships and regulations.”
Vera Brittain, Testament of Youth

Simon Singh
“(Florence) Nightingale's passion for statistics enabled her to persuade the government of the importance of a whole series of health reforms. for example, many people had argued that training nurses was a waste of time, because patients cared for by trained nurses actually had a higher mortality rate than those treated by untrained staff. Nightingale, however, pointed out that this was only because more serious cases were being sent to those wards with trained nurses. If the intention is to compare the results from two groups, then it is essential to assign patients randomly to the two groups. Sure enough, when Nightingale set up trials in which patients were randomly assigned to trained and untrained nurses, it became clear that the cohort of patients treated by trained nurses fared much better than their counterparts in wards with untrained nurses.”
Simon Singh, Trick or Treatment: The Undeniable Facts about Alternative Medicine

Christie Watson
“We will meet people on the way: patients, relatives and staff - people you may recognize already. Because we are all nursed at some point in our lives. We are all nurses.”
Christie Watson, The Language of Kindness: A Nurse's Story

“When you help someone and change his/her life, you are an extraordinary person. When you save someone's life, you are a hero. When you help people and save their lives everyday, you are a nurse".”
Ghassan Shahrour MD

Peter Wohlleben
“A good upbringing is necessary for a long life, but sometimes the patience of the young trees is sorely tested. As I mentioned in chapter 5, "Tree Lottery," acorns and beechnuts fall at the feet of large "mother trees." Dr. Suzanne Simard, who helped discover maternal instincts in trees, describes mother trees as dominant trees widely linked to other trees in the forest through their fungal-root connections. These trees pass their legacy on to the next generation and exert their influence in the upbringing of the youngsters. "My" small beech trees, which have by now been waiting for at least eighty years, are standing under mother trees that are about two hundred years old -- the equivalent of forty-year-olds in human terms. The stunted trees can probably expect another two hundred years of twiddling their thumbs before it is finally their turn. The wait time is, however, made bearable. Their mothers are in contact with them through their root systems, and they pass along sugar and other nutrients. You might even say they are nursing their babies.”
Peter Wohlleben, The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate – Discoveries from a Secret World

“Find current LPN programs in Arkansas. See our list of accredited Arkansas LPN schools that offer LPN training classes.”
Nursing Staff of the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital at Stan

Sarah Manguso
“In my experience nursing is waiting. The mother becomes the background against which the baby lives, becomes time. I used to exist against the continuity of time. Then I became the baby's continuity, a background of ongoing time for him to live against. I was the warmth and milk that was always there for him, the agent of comfort that was always there for him.

My body, my life, became the landscape of my son's life. I am no longer merely a thing living in the world; I am a world.”
Sarah Manguso, The Two Kinds of Decay

Israelmore Ayivor
“I was taught that the most hardworking nurse is found at the dirtiest part of the clinical ward.”
Israelmore Ayivor, Leaders' Frontpage: Leadership Insights from 21 Martin Luther King Jr. Thoughts

Christie Watson
“It is impossible to describe exactly what I learn, though I know it lies somewhere between science and art. It is all about the smallest details and understanding how they make the biggest difference.”
Christie Watson, The Language of Kindness: A Nurse's Story

Charisse Montgomery
“When it is managed effectively, in-home nursing can become a support for caregivers and families stressed with the care of a medically fragile child.”
Charisse Montgomery, Home Care CEO: A Parent's Guide to Managing In-home Pediatric Nursing

Richard Paul Evans
“I work at a retirement home. I'm a CNA.”
“What's that?”
“It stands for Certified Nursing Assistant.”
“That sounds important,” I said.
She laughed. “If changing old people's diapers is important.”
I thought for a moment, then said, “It is for the old people.”
Richard Paul Evans, The Broken Road

Jessica Bates
“I try to feel my own edges in the
low light. I send my mind to the
outer edges of me — where do I end?
I send myself to my innermost edges,
and I see that in both directions 
I am infinite.”
Jessica Bates, Birth & What Came After: poems on motherhood

Charisse Montgomery
“Once you open your home to nursing, you essentially become the employer of a small staff, even if you aren’t signing the paychecks. As in any workplace, the staff needs to know the rules and expectations, and it is your job to set them and communicate them well. This is your new job; you’ve been promoted to Home Care CEO.”
Charisse Montgomery, Home Care CEO: A Parent's Guide to Managing In-home Pediatric Nursing

Charisse Montgomery
“If your child comes home with a stable staff of nurses that remains stable for years without interruption, you might be a family of unicorns”
Charisse Montgomery, Home Care CEO: A Parent's Guide to Managing In-home Pediatric Nursing

Tilda Shalof
“Medicine is becoming a business, and if people choose medicine as a way to make money, they should go to the States because there, health care is a commodity for sale and you can shop around for the best product. Patients are the customers and if you're rich you get better health care than if you're poor. In Canada, health care is a basic human right, a service that every human being deserves. Tell me, have any of you ever seen someone get preferential treatment? A Canadian over a non-resident? A white person over one of color? A VIP over an ordinary citizen?”
Tilda Shalof, A Nurse's Story

Charisse Montgomery
“Managing in-home nursing is not always easy. It can be terribly frustrating sometimes, and it can take a while to feel like everything is under control, but success is possible.”
Charisse Montgomery, Home Care CEO: A Parent's Guide to Managing In-home Pediatric Nursing

Joey Lawsin
“Give a Smile. Afterall, it's Free.”
Joey Lawsin

Joyce Rachelle
“How did I prepare for night shifts? When I was a small, anxious kid, I checked my mom in her sleep to make sure she was still breathing.”
Joyce Rachelle

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