Migration Quotes

Quotes tagged as "migration" (showing 1-30 of 85)
نجيب محفوظ
“أليس من الأفضل أن نهاجر بدلاً من أن نتزوج؟
فالزواج هجرة داخلية”
نجيب محفوظ, الحب تحت المطر

Salman Rushdie
“Exile is a dream of a glorious return. Exile is a vision of revolution: Elba, not St Helena. It is an endless paradox: looking forward by always looking back. The exile is a ball hurled high into the air. ”
Salman Rushdie, The Satanic Verses

José Saramago
“Let him who has not a single speck of migration to blot his family escutcheon cast the first stone...if you didn't migrate then your father did, and if your father didn't need to move from place to place, then it was only because your grandfather before him had no choice but to go, put his old life behind him in search of the bread that his own land denied him...”
José Saramago, The Notebook

Kenneth Grahame
“The past was like a bad dream; the future was all happy holiday as I moved Southwards week by week, easily, lazily, lingering as long as I dared, but always heeding the call!”
Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows

Mohsin Hamid
“The news in those days was full of war and migrants and nativists, and it was full of fracturing too, of regions pulling away from nations, and cities pulling away from hinterlands, and it seemed that as everyone was coming together everyone was also moving apart. Without borders nations appeared to be becoming somewhat illusory, and people were questioning what role they had to play.”
Mohsin Hamid, Exit West

“I look through the window at the huge valley lit up with different colors. The town is cradled by the dark mountains. From afar it looks as if nothing can get in or out, but judging by the stillness of the view it's as if the citizens have made peace with it and have settled without worry into their insular but protected haven each evening. There are people in the world, I imagine, who are born and die in the same town, maybe even in the same house, or bed. Creatures without migration: have they not lived a life because they have not moved? What of the migratory los González, moving from one place to another and marking every stopping place with angst? What kind of alternative is that? For once my father and I are thinking thinking the same way, sharing a similar yearning for our starting points to have been different, for our final destination to be anything other than the tearful, resentful arrival it is likely to be.”
Rigoberto González, Butterfly Boy: Memories of a Chicano Mariposa

Claire Messud
“But do you know this idea of the imaginary homeland? Once you set out from shore on your little boat, once you embark, you'll never truly be at home again. What you've left behind exists only in memory, and your ideal place becomes some strange imaginary concoction of all you've left behind at every stop.”
Claire Messud, The Woman Upstairs

Aanchal Malhotra
“I have grown up listening to my grandparents’ stories about ‘the other side’ of the border. But, as a child, this other side didn’t quite register as Pakistan, or not-India, but rather as some mythic land devoid of geographic borders, ethnicity and nationality. In fact, through their stories, I imagined it as a land with mango orchards, joint families, village settlements, endless lengths of ancestral fields extending into the horizon, and quaint local bazaars teeming with excitement on festive days. As a result, the history of my grandparents’ early lives in what became Pakistan essentially came across as a very idyllic, somewhat rural, version of happiness.”
Aanchal Malhotra

“Some historians, in fact, suggest Hartford recruiters may have pioneered strategies that spurred the great migration of Southern rural blacks to Northern cities.”
Susan Eaton, The Children in Room E4: American Education on Trial

Douglas Murray
“Charles Martel’s victory at the Battle of Tours in 732 is recognised for having prevented the spread of Islam throughout Europe.”
Douglas Murray, The Strange Death of Europe: Immigration, Identity, Islam

Douglas Murray
“But if the views of some migrant communities on homosexuality were only a couple of generations out of date, the views of portions of those communities on the subject of women were shown to be out of date by many centuries, at least.”
Douglas Murray, The Strange Death of Europe: Immigration, Identity, Islam

“Life in Australia is more equal and less competitive than in America; but there are dozens of similarities...migrations to a new land, the mystique of pioneering (actually somewhat different in the two countries), the turbulence of gold rushes, the brutality of relaxed restraint, the boredoms of the backblocks, the feeling of making life anew. There may be more similarities between the history of Australia and America than for the moment Australians can understand.”
Donald Horne, The Lucky Country

Rana Abdulfattah
“I am so happy migrating birds and animals do not have visa issues and fences in the sky to halt their efforts to survive, but humans with their mindful consciousness do actually build walls around themselves.”
Rana Abdulfattah, Tiger and Clay: Syria Fragments

Dido Sotiriou
“Hayatımda ilk defa olarak karşı karşıya kalıyordum iktidarın o basiretsiz körlüğüyle; dehşete uğramıştım. O çağımda nereden bilebirdim ki ben, bütün ömrüm boyunca, hep bu körlükle savaşacağım”
Dido Sotiriou, Ματωμένα χώματα

Mohsin Hamid
“All over the world people were slipping away from where they had been, from once fertile plains cracking with dryness, from seaside villages gasping beneath tidal surges, from overcrowded cities and murderous battlefields, and slipping away from other people too, people they had in some cases loved.”
Mohsin Hamid

Kader Abdolah
“Wie nooit meer terug naar huis mag, raakt in een staat van verbeelding.”
Kader Abdolah, De kraai

Steve Inskeep
“Karachi has been a destination for some of the most dramatic migrations of all.”
Steve Inskeep, Instant City: Life and Death in Karachi

Mohsin Hamid
“(...) and all sorts of strange people were around, people who looked more at home than she was, even the homeless ones who spoke no English, more at home maybe because they were younger, and when she went out it seemed to her that she too had migrated, that everyone migrates, even if we stay in the same houses our whole lives, because we can't help it.
We are all migrants through time.”
Mohsin Hamid, Exit West

Douglas Murray
“Nevertheless, the idea that Europeans have simply stopped having enough children and must as a result ensure that the next generation is comprised of immigrants is a disastrous fallacy for several reasons. The first is because of the mistaken assumption that a country’s population should always remain the same or indeed continue rising. The nation states of Europe include some of the most densely populated countries on the planet. It is not at all obvious that the quality of life in these countries will improve if the population continues growing. What is more, when migrants arrive in these countries they move to the big cities, not to the remaining sparsely populated areas. So although among European states Britain, along with Belgium and the Netherlands, is one of the most densely populated countries, England taken on its own would be the second most densely populated country in Europe. Migrants tend not to head to the Highlands of Scotland or the wilds of Dartmoor. And so a constantly increasing population causes population problems in areas that are already suffering housing supply problems and where infrastructure like public transport struggles to keep up with swiftly expanding populations.”
Douglas Murray, The Strange Death of Europe: Immigration, Identity, Islam

Douglas Murray
“Even if you agreed that longevity is a curse for a society, there are many things you might do before deciding to import the next generation from another continent.”
Douglas Murray, The Strange Death of Europe: Immigration, Identity, Islam

Mala Naidoo
“Once we are made aware of the universality of our angsts and joys, we become one under the sky of humanity”
Mala Naidoo

Aanchal Malhotra
“Every time the train stopped at a station, we would all hold our breath, making sure not a single sound drifted out of the closed windows. We were hungry and our throats parched. From inside the train we heard voices travelling up and down the platform, saying, “Hindu paani,” and, from the other side, “Muslim paani.” Apart from land and population, even the water had now been divided”
Aanchal Malhotra, Remnants of a Separation: A History of the Partition through Material Memory

Douglas Murray
“Only because of the strength of a coalition of European armies at the battle of Vienna in 1683 did Europe avoid Ottoman rule.”
Douglas Murray, The Strange Death of Europe: Immigration, Identity, Islam

Douglas Murray
“Algerian President Houari Boumedienne who in 1974 told the General Assembly of the United Nations, ‘One day millions of men will leave the southern hemisphere of this planet to burst into the northern one. But not as friends. Because they will burst in to conquer, and they will conquer by populating it with their children. Victory will come to us from the wombs of our women.”
Douglas Murray, The Strange Death of Europe: Immigration, Identity, Islam

Douglas Murray
“As Dr Tino Sanandaji has pointed out, it costs more for 3,000 migrants to be housed in temporary accommodation tents in Sweden than it does to fund outright the largest refugee camp in Jordan (housing around 100,000 Syrian refugees).”
Douglas Murray, The Strange Death of Europe: Immigration, Identity, Islam

Douglas Murray
“At the height of the 2015 crisis the single offer the Saudis did make was to build 200 new mosques in Germany for the benefit of the country’s new arrivals.”
Douglas Murray, The Strange Death of Europe: Immigration, Identity, Islam

John Steinbeck
“Look,” said the man. “It don’t make no sense. This fella wants eight hunderd men. So he prints up five thousand of them things an’ maybe twenty thousan’ people sees ’em. An’ maybe two-three thousan’ folks gets movin’ account a this here han’bill. Folks that’s crazy with worry.” “But it don’t make no sense!” Pa cried. “Not till you see the fella that put out this here bill. You’ll see him, or somebody that’s workin’ for him. You’ll be a-campin’ by a ditch, you an’fifty other famblies. An’ he’ll look in your tent an’ see if you got anything lef’ to eat. An’ if you got nothin’, he says, ‘Wanna job?’ An’ you’ll say, ‘I sure do, mister. I’ll sure thank you for a chance to do some work.’ An’ he’ll say, ‘I can use you.’ An’ you’ll say, ‘When do I start?’ An’ he’ll tell you where to go, an’ what time, an’ then he’ll go on. Maybe he needs two hundred men, so he talks to five hundred, an’ they tell other folks, an’ when you get to the place, they’s a thousand’, men. This here fella says, ‘I’m payin’ twenty cents an hour.’ An’ maybe half the men walk off. But they’s still five hundred that’s so goddamn hungry they’ll work for nothin’ but biscuits. Well, this here fella’s got a contract to pick them peaches or—chop that cotton. You see now? The more fellas he can get, an’ the hungrier, less he’s gonna pay. An’ he’ll get a fella with kids if he can, ’cause—hell, I says I wasn’t gonna fret ya.”
John Steinbeck, The Grapes of Wrath

Aanchal Malhotra
“Migration is often accompanied by a feeling of unavoidable disorientation, and the circumstances of 1947 would have pronounced this feeling. In most cases, it would have created an involuntary distance between where one was born before the Partition and where one moved to after it, stretching out their identity sparsely over the expanse of this distance. As a result, somewhere in between the original city of their birth and the adopted city of residence, would lay their essence – strangely malleable.”
Aanchal Malhotra, Remnants of a Separation: A History of the Partition through Material Memory

Aanchal Malhotra
“The notion that where one is from can be understood using what remains of that place opens up a highly sensitive and rich terrain that can help unpack belonging, especially if that place has now been rendered inaccessible by national borders.”
Aanchal Malhotra, Remnants of a Separation: A History of the Partition through Material Memory

“Topography defines place and the human situation therein.”
Lloyd Wedes

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