Miscarriage Quotes

Quotes tagged as "miscarriage" Showing 1-30 of 73
C.S. Lewis
“If a mother is mourning not for what she has lost but for what her dead child has lost, it is a comfort to believe that the child has not lost the end for which it was created. And it is a comfort to believe that she herself, in losing her chief or only natural happiness, has not lost a greater thing, that she may still hope to "glorify God and enjoy Him forever." A comfort to the God-aimed, eternal spirit within her. But not to her motherhood. The specifically maternal happiness must be written off. Never, in any place or time, will she have her son on her knees, or bathe him, or tell him a story, or plan for his future, or see her grandchild.”
C.S. Lewis, A Grief Observed

Cheryl Strayed
“The healing power of even the most microscopic exchange with someone who knows in a flash precisely what you're talking about because she experienced that thing too cannot be overestimated.”
Cheryl Strayed, Tiny Beautiful Things: Advice on Love and Life from Dear Sugar

R.J. Gonzales
“A flower bloomed already wilting. Beginning its life with an early ending.”
RJ Gonzales, Mundahlia

“Some people say it is a shame. Others even imply that it would have been better if the baby had never been created. But the short time I had with my child is precious to me. It is painful to me, but I still wouldn't wish it away. I prayed that God would bless us with a baby. Each child is a gift, and I am proud that we cooperated with God in the creation of a new soul for all eternity. Although not with me, my baby lives.”
Christine O'Keeffe Lafser, An Empty Cradle, a Full Heart: Reflections for Mothers and Fathers after Miscarriage, Stillbirth, or Infant Death

“I am not functioning very well. Living with the knowledge that the baby is dead is painful. I feel so far away from you, God. I can only try to believe that you are sustaining me and guiding me through this. Please continue to stand by my side.”
Christine O'Keeffe Lafser, An Empty Cradle, a Full Heart: Reflections for Mothers and Fathers after Miscarriage, Stillbirth, or Infant Death

Brittainy C. Cherry
“Being an almost mother isn’t a thing. You have seven children, whether they made it here or not doesn’t take away from the fact they existed. They were yours, and they were loved fully if only for those small moments.
You are a mother, Grace. I am so, so sorry you were never able to hold your babies, but you are, and always will be, a mother.”
Brittainy C. Cherry, Disgrace

Brittainy C. Cherry
“Any woman who’d ever lost a child knew of the hollowness that remained within the soul.”
Brittainy C. Cherry, Disgrace

Diana Gabaldon
“For several days, I slept. Whether this was a necessary part of physical recovery, or a stubborn retreat from waking reality, I do not know, but I woke only reluctantly to take a little food, falling at once back into a stupor of oblivion, as though the small, warm weight of broth in my stomach were an anchor that pulled me after it, down through the murky fathoms of sleep.”
Diana Gabaldon, Dragonfly in Amber

Nathalie Himmelrich
“We do not have control over many things in life and death but we do have control over the meaning we give it.”
Nathalie Himmelrich, Grieving Parents: Surviving Loss as a Couple

Brittainy C. Cherry
“The world was selfish, unjust. How could so many undeserving people be given the opportunity to raise children they didn’t even want while so many worthy individuals didn’t get the chance?”
Brittainy C. Cherry, Disgrace

Tara Wine-Queen
“There are days worth living still, worth the pain of this life and the pain of their deaths.

I guess I'm just asking you a favor, in the end:

Don't give up before the future comes around that was meant for you, okay?”
Tara Wine-Queen, Tenderness and Troubling Times: A Collection of Stories

“It’s not that motherhood is out of reach, it’s that it’s just out of reach. It’s not that motherhood didn’t happen, it’s that it almost did and, in fact, still could. The difference between the grief of infertility and other reasons for mourning - the loss of a spouse, for example - is in that promise of ‘just,’ in ‘almost,’ in ‘still could.”
Alexandra Kimball, The Seed: Infertility is a Feminist Issue

Nathalie Himmelrich
“There is no right way to grieve; there is only your way to grieve and that is different for everyone.”
Nathalie Himmelrich, Grieving Parents: Surviving Loss as a Couple

Brittainy C. Cherry
“I’d thought those memories would be the ones I always cherished, but as the days and years passed by, those beautiful memories became my pain.”
Brittainy C. Cherry, Disgrace

Brittainy C. Cherry
“Throughout my life, there were a few hard days. Days where even when I tried to be happy, my heart still cracked, and Mother’s Day was one of those. For others, it stood as a celebration. For me, it spoke of loss and failure.”
Brittainy C. Cherry, Disgrace

Brittainy C. Cherry
“This book is for the mothers who've had to say goodbye too soon. I see you, I hear you, and I honor your hearts with wings. You are the strongest individuals alive, and I'm blown away by your strength, your ability to love, and your ability to not quit on life.”
Brittainy C. Cherry, Disgrace

“They don’t get the particular nature of this grief, how it’s less about the loss of a potential child than it is about the endless possibility that there may yet be an actual child.”
Alexandra Kimball, The Seed: Infertility is a Feminist Issue

“All I could do was cry; I felt desolate, the tears rolling down my cheeks as I tried to comprehend what had happened.”
Colette Centeno Fox

Adriel Booker
“Grief is wild like the sea, but it doesn’t need to destroy us. We can’t conquer it, but we can navigate it, and we can find Jesus there too.”
Adriel Booker

Brittainy C. Cherry
“Because there is no such thing as an “almost” mother. Seven bouquets from your seven angels. Happy Mother’s Day, Princess.”
Brittainy C. Cherry, Disgrace

Soraya Chemaly
“What my sister needed was not people urging her, as so many did, to get pregnant again as soon as possible, but acknowledgment of her loss and the violence that she experienced in that loss. She needed to know that this was not a failure or that she was a bad mother. She needed to be allowed to be not only sad but also, in her grief, to be angry. But as Gunther explained, "Society does not like to hear from us castaway mothers.”
Soraya Chemaly, Rage Becomes Her: The Power of Women's Anger

Ariel Levy
“Euripides wrote, “What greater grief can there be for mortals than to see their children dead?” That was more like it.
Am I allowed to say “my son”? Was it not a statement of fact that I had given birth on the bathroom floor of the Blue Sky Hotel in Mongolia and watched my son live and die?”
Ariel Levy, The Rules Do Not Apply

“...Miscarriage is death without ceremony. No funeral, no name. No one would ever tell you, for example, that mother-death is actually quite common, hang in there honey, you'll find another mother.”
Hannah Palmer, Flight Path: A Search for Roots beneath the World's Busiest Airport

Ben Ditmars
“He could go to hell for all she cared but Journey was a loss clawing at her throat each morning.”
Ben Ditmars

Shannon Gibney
“A friend tells me that the experiences we have in other countries are untranslatable. I think this also applies to miscarriage. It is hard to describe what it’s like to lose someone I never saw outside of my body, never held, never grew to know or love, but whom I felt intimately attached to and who was already connected to my husband and son. As a Korean adoptee, raised in a white family, I longed to have babies that were related to me. I could only imagine what it would be like to finally look at another person’s face and see myself reflected back. When I miscarried, I experienced yet another loss of a person who was a part of me. It is challenging to articulate and impossible to find words in any language to describe what it’s like to long for a family that was supposed to be, when I am grateful for and fiercely love the family I have. It is the incompleteness that I struggle with. It is missing someone I never knew, but whom I wanted desperately to be a part of my life.”
Shannon Gibney, What God Is Honored Here?: Writings on Miscarriage and Infant Loss by and for Native Women and Women of Color

Jodi Sky Rogers
“It’s strange territory, this desertland between maidenhood and motherhood. I suppose it was ingrained from an early age that one stage naturally and effortlessly follows the next. Yet, here I stand, longing to make that transition, both ready and eager to enter an elusive place, the door to which remains tightly shut. So, I rest on the periphery, a wandering nomadic drifter waiting my turn. I am lost in an eternal dance of emotion, shifting between hopefulness, grief, frustration and fear. Some days I feel strongly that my time is coming soon and I will be a mother. Other days I am impatient and not so sure it will ever happen for me.”
Jodi Sky Rogers

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Audrey Niffenegger
“I close my eyes and all I can think of is red. So I get a tube of watercolour, cadmium red dark, and I get a big mop of a brush, and I fill a jar with water, and I begin to cover the paper with red. It glistens. The paper is limp with moisture, and it darkens as it dries. I watch it drying. It smells of gum arabic. In the centre of the paper, very small, in black ink, I draw a heart, not a silly Valentine but an anatomically-correct heart, tiny, doll-like, and then veins, delicate road-map of veins, that reach all the way to the edges of the paper, that hold the small heart enmeshed like a fly in a spiderweb. See, there's his heartbeat.”
Audrey Niffenegger, The Time Traveler's Wife

Sarah Sentilles
“Do you have kids?" strangers asked almost every day.
"No," I said, not wanting to explain, because, really, it's an unimaginative question, full of their beliefs about what family means, about who counts as kin, and it's a hard question for anyone with a complicated relationship to family making, for those of us who've experience miscarriage or failed adoptions or the death of a child, for those of us estranged or embattled or in grief. It's a question I now refuse to ask. "Tell me about your family," I say instead, because I know belonging comes in all shapes and sizes, visible and invisible, hidden and made and chosen and found.”
Sarah Sentilles, Stranger Care

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