Miscarriage Quotes

Quotes tagged as "miscarriage" (showing 1-30 of 59)
C.S. Lewis
“If a mother is mourning not for what she has lost but for what her dead child has lost, it is a comfort to believe that the child has not lost the end for which it was created. And it is a comfort to believe that she herself, in losing her chief or only natural happiness, has not lost a greater thing, that she may still hope to "glorify God and enjoy Him forever." A comfort to the God-aimed, eternal spirit within her. But not to her motherhood. The specifically maternal happiness must be written off. Never, in any place or time, will she have her son on her knees, or bathe him, or tell him a story, or plan for his future, or see her grandchild.”
C.S. Lewis, A Grief Observed

Cheryl Strayed
“The healing power of even the most microscopic exchange with someone who knows in a flash precisely what you're talking about because she experienced that thing too cannot be overestimated.”
Cheryl Strayed, Tiny Beautiful Things: Advice on Love and Life from Dear Sugar

R.J. Gonzales
“A flower bloomed already wilting. Beginning its life with an early ending.”
RJ Gonzales, Mundahlia

“Some people say it is a shame. Others even imply that it would have been better if the baby had never been created. But the short time I had with my child is precious to me. It is painful to me, but I still wouldn't wish it away. I prayed that God would bless us with a baby. Each child is a gift, and I am proud that we cooperated with God in the creation of a new soul for all eternity. Although not with me, my baby lives.”
Christine O'Keeffe Lafser, An Empty Cradle, a Full Heart: Reflections for Mothers and Fathers after Miscarriage, Stillbirth, or Infant Death

“I am not functioning very well. Living with the knowledge that the baby is dead is painful. I feel so far away from you, God. I can only try to believe that you are sustaining me and guiding me through this. Please continue to stand by my side.”
Christine O'Keeffe Lafser, An Empty Cradle, a Full Heart: Reflections for Mothers and Fathers after Miscarriage, Stillbirth, or Infant Death

Diana Gabaldon
“For several days, I slept. Whether this was a necessary part of physical recovery, or a stubborn retreat from waking reality, I do not know, but I woke only reluctantly to take a little food, falling at once back into a stupor of oblivion, as though the small, warm weight of broth in my stomach were an anchor that pulled me after it, down through the murky fathoms of sleep.”
Diana Gabaldon, Dragonfly in Amber

Brittainy C. Cherry
“Any woman who’d ever lost a child knew of the hollowness that remained within the soul.”
Brittainy C. Cherry, Disgrace

Brittainy C. Cherry
“Being an almost mother isn’t a thing. You have seven children, whether they made it here or not doesn’t take away from the fact they existed. They were yours, and they were loved fully if only for those small moments.
You are a mother, Grace. I am so, so sorry you were never able to hold your babies, but you are, and always will be, a mother.”
Brittainy C. Cherry, Disgrace

L.M. Browning
“I no longer seek those things that help me to heal but for those things that fortify me with the strength required to carry the load fate has set upon my shoulders. Instead of finding a way to forget, find a way to bear the constant remembering. The silence of the wild being one of those elements that reinforce the weathered walls of the soul and mind.”
L.M. Browning, To Lose the Madness: Field Notes on Trauma, Loss and Radical Authenticity

L.M. Browning
“I’m broken. We’re all broken and right now we’re all isolated within that brokenness. The cure for the loneliness is connection—connection with that broken part of ourselves and with each other—and we can’t achieve that connection while pretending we are okay. We’re not okay.”
L.M. Browning, To Lose the Madness: Field Notes on Trauma, Loss and Radical Authenticity

Brittainy C. Cherry
“The world was selfish, unjust. How could so many undeserving people be given the opportunity to raise children they didn’t even want while so many worthy individuals didn’t get the chance?”
Brittainy C. Cherry, Disgrace

Brian K. Vaughan
“Here's the thing about miscarriage. They are painful, they are horrific, and they are very, very common. There are no funerals for Those Who Might Have Been, leaving parents to mourn their loss in strange and unexpected ways. But while a miscarriage may feel like the end of the world... it's actually just the beginning of a new one.”
Brian K. Vaughan, Saga, Vol. 8

Nathalie Himmelrich
“There is no right way to grieve; there is only your way to grieve and that is different for everyone.”
Nathalie Himmelrich, Grieving Parents: Surviving Loss as a Couple

Nathalie Himmelrich
“We do not "get over" a death. We learn to carry the grief and integrate the loss in our lives. In our hearts, we carry those who have died. We grieve and we love. We remember.”
Nathalie Himmelrich, Grieving Parents: Surviving Loss as a Couple

Nathalie Himmelrich
“Grieving is intense and it is non-stop intense. Even if things are quiet, and you're sitting there in your chair, kind of staring off into space, inside, the intensity is raging. - Lori Ennis”
Nathalie Himmelrich, Grieving Parents: Surviving Loss as a Couple

Nathalie Himmelrich
“I don't think we had a joint mission to keep our relationship together. It was like: "Every man for himself." I was in so much pain, I wasn't really looking out for your interests. I didn't have the facility or resource to really do that, to be there for you. Thankfully everything held together. Our love for each other kept on a progression. It could have easily gone the other way." - Jonathan Pascual”
Nathalie Himmelrich, Grieving Parents: Surviving Loss as a Couple

Nathalie Himmelrich
“Trust your partner's way of coping to be the best they are able to do and be at every moment in time.”
Nathalie Himmelrich, Grieving Parents: Surviving Loss as a Couple

Nathalie Himmelrich
“When my wife and I lost our son, we had similar but very different experiences. She felt she was caught in a blizzard and she doesn't remember the six months after we lost him. For me, it was like everything that I had known burnt to the ground, this field or forest that was turned to ash, burning, smoldering. How do I make sense of a world where this can happen? - Sean Hanish”
Nathalie Himmelrich, Grieving Parents: Surviving Loss as a Couple

Nathalie Himmelrich
“Just because we lost a life, doesn't mean we have to lose ourselves. - Tamara Gabriel”
Nathalie Himmelrich, Grieving Parents: Surviving Loss as a Couple

Nathalie Himmelrich
“The best advice that I got during counseling: Don't judge your spouse's grief response. Give them the freedom to grieve their own way. - Rachel Crawford”
Nathalie Himmelrich, Grieving Parents: Surviving Loss as a Couple

Nathalie Himmelrich
“There are many different ways in which individuals express, experience, and adapt to grief. Understanding and accepting different ways of grieving lies at the heart of surviving your loss as a couple. Understanding is helpful but not absolutely necessary. Acceptance of your partner's approach however is a necessity. If you have not reached acceptance, make it your first priority.”
Nathalie Himmelrich, Grieving Parents: Surviving Loss as a Couple

Nathalie Himmelrich
“Honestly, death took on a totally different meaning for me in the past years.....I don't feel the fear or trepidation about death that I used to feel. I felt tired of living.”
Nathalie Himmelrich, Grieving Parents: Surviving Loss as a Couple

Nathalie Himmelrich
“We do not have control over many things in life and death but we do have control over the meaning we give it.”
Nathalie Himmelrich, Grieving Parents: Surviving Loss as a Couple

Brittainy C. Cherry
“I’d thought those memories would be the ones I always cherished, but as the days and years passed by, those beautiful memories became my pain.”
Brittainy C. Cherry, Disgrace

Peggy Orenstein
“Maybe learning to live with the question marks, recognizing that closure does not always occur, is all I really needed to do.
I hadn't expected, coming from a world that fights to see life's beginnings in black and white, to be so comforted by a shade of gray.
The notion of the water child made sense to me. What I had experienced was not a full life, nor was it a full death, but it was a real loss.”
Peggy Orenstein, Don't Call Me Princess: Essays on Girls, Women, Sex, and Life

L.M. Browning
“During the worst of it, onlookers who have learned my story often comment to me that, “All the hardships you suffered were part of a divine plan for your life because something good came from each bad thing.” As though a divine presence decided to teach me these great lessons through pain. I am affronted by such a suggestion because it robs me of my accomplishment by removing the element of transcendence.
I don’t believe we learn anything from suffering. If human beings inherently learned through suffering, we would be a population of enlightened beings and we’re not. We learn from suffering if and only if we manage to transcend our suffering to find meaning in what is otherwise senseless. This process of transcendence is a profoundly human one that imparts the deepest—most lasting—sense of achievement.”
L.M. Browning, To Lose the Madness: Field Notes on Trauma, Loss and Radical Authenticity

L.M. Browning
“Throughout the journey West, I had a raging fever. In a mere two days, we drove 1,925 miles from Connecticut to Colorado Springs, where we chose to break our journey. The further West we went, the sicker I seemed to become. As though the turmoil, rage, and grief within me were tightening their coiled grip, sensing that something was coming that would force it to relinquish their hold.”
L.M. Browning, To Lose the Madness: Field Notes on Trauma, Loss and Radical Authenticity

Brittainy C. Cherry
“Throughout my life, there were a few hard days. Days where even when I tried to be happy, my heart still cracked, and Mother’s Day was one of those. For others, it stood as a celebration. For me, it spoke of loss and failure.”
Brittainy C. Cherry, Disgrace

Brittainy C. Cherry
“Because there is no such thing as an “almost” mother. Seven bouquets from your seven angels. Happy Mother’s Day, Princess.”
Brittainy C. Cherry, Disgrace

Brittainy C. Cherry
“This book is for the mothers who've had to say goodbye too soon. I see you, I hear you, and I honor your hearts with wings. You are the strongest individuals alive, and I'm blown away by your strength, your ability to love, and your ability to not quit on life.”
Brittainy C. Cherry, Disgrace

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