Menopause Quotes

Quotes tagged as "menopause" Showing 1-30 of 57
Florence King
“A woman must wait for her ovaries to die before she can get her rightful personality back. Post-menstrual is the same as pre-menstrual; I am once again what I was before the age of twelve: a female human being who knows that a month has thirty day, not twenty-five, and who can spend every one of them free of the shackles of that defect of body and mind known as femininity.”
Florence King

Celia Rivenbark
“I'm what is known as perimenopausal. "Peri", some of you may know, is a Latin prefix meaning 'SHUT YOUR FLIPPIN' PIE HOLE".”
Celia Rivenbark, You Don't Sweat Much for a Fat Girl: Observations on Life from the Shallow End of the Pool

“[Hot flashes] are the prime cause of sleep disruption in women over age fifty, Suzanne Woodward of Wayne State University School of Medicine reports. Her studies show that hot flashes in sleep occur about once an hour. Most prompt an arousal of three minutes or longer. Independently of their hot flashes, women who have them still awaken briefly every eight minutes on average. The sleep process dramatically blunts memory for awakenings, Woodward said, and in the morning women seldom realize how poorly they slept. Instead, they often focus on the daytime consequences of poor sleep, which include fatigue, lethargy, mood swings, depression, and irritability. Many women and their doctors, Woodward said, dismiss such symptoms as "just menopause." This is a mistake, she suggested, because treatment can reduce or eliminate hot flashes, aid sleep, relieve other symptoms, and improve a woman's quality of life. Treatment also helps keep frequent awakenings from becoming a bad habit that continues after hot flashes subside.”
Michael Smolensky, The Body Clock Guide to Better Health: How to Use your Body's Natural Clock to Fight Illness and Achieve Maximum Health

Dorothea Benton Frank
“The first indication of menopause is a broken thermostat. It's either that or your weight. In any case, if you don't do something, you could be dead by August.

God, middle age is an unending insult.”
Dorothea Benton Frank, Sullivan's Island

Israelmore Ayivor
“The menopause of Sarah became her menostart; this is feminine beauty! The death plot against Mordecai became his life spring; this is masculine beauty! A kind of life lived in God's word is a life of miraculous beauty!”
Israelmore Ayivor

“On a planet where for thousands of years, even today, a woman's worth has been judged exclusively by the productivity of her womb, what the hell is the point of a barren woman?”
Elissa Stein and Susan Kim

“The silvered glamour of the Woman of the Winter Moon may be woman in her greatest power, woman in her guise as Elemental, as Force of Nature. This is woman to be revered. She is a concentration of feminine wisdom gathered and concentrated over the years, blended with the astral knowledge of the soul-star, and blessed by the traditions of the Sacred Feminine that she has made herself, or resurrected from Time, and passed living and intact to her daughters.”
Elizabeth S. Eiler Ph.D., Singing Woman: Voices of the Sacred Feminine

Ada Calhoun
“Gen Xers are in 'the prime of their lives' at a particularly dangerous and divisive moment,' Boomer marketing expert Faith Popcorn told me. 'They have been hit hard financially and dismissed culturally. They have tons of debt. They're squeezed on both sides by children and aging parents. The grim state of adulthood is hitting them hard. If they're exhausted and bewildered, they have every reason to feel that way.”
Ada Calhoun, Why We Can't Sleep: Women's New Midlife Crisis

Terri Hanson Mead
“For many women who have been caring for and putting others first, midlife is the time when there’s finally space to start thinking about you. You may feel compelled to make room for you, to live with greater purpose, or to answer the call to do something big in the world. It’s during this time that we can begin to define what legacy we want to leave.

If you’ve lost sight of who you are and what you want, it’s time to explore and experiment and define your own new milestones. Up until this point, there have been socially defined milestones like college, first job, maybe marriage, maybe kids, maybe grad school, maybe the first house, and then if there are kids, the kids’ milestones. The lack of milestones can make midlife feel like uncharted territory.

It is, and it’s ready to be explored and conquered.

If you’re reading this book, it’s time. Time for you. Time for vision. Time for clarity. Time for you to resolve unresolved issues from your childhood, adolescence, and early twenties. Because if you don’t, they are going to keep resurfacing. Trust me on this one.”
Terri Hanson Mead, Piloting Your Life

“Perhaps the hardest part in finding your courage is remembering how you lost it in the first place. We do not suddenly become people who settle for the ordinary and the safe places. Such things happen to us in increments of time as we bargain away our questing selves for the promises of security.”
Cheryl Bridges Johns, Seven Transforming Gifts of Menopause: An Unexpected Spiritual Journey

“In the safest of places, there is death, divorce, economic recessions, and cancer. Accepting this fact helps you not know any better than to risk adventure in the second half of life.”
Cheryl Bridges Johns, Seven Transforming Gifts of Menopause: An Unexpected Spiritual Journey

Ada Calhoun
“One night in December 2018, the Tony-winning actress and singer TOnya Pinkins talked onstage about her experience of menopause adding: "Things are so much better than they were decades ago, but they can be bad and better at the same time." "Bad and better" is one way to think about our prospects at this stage of life too.”
Ada Calhoun, Why We Can't Sleep: Women's New Midlife Crisis

Caroline Carr
“You might be chatting sociably with friends, and suddenly you notice that they're all flapping their hands at at their faces. You're all sitting there like a bunch of chickens - all flapping away. You hardly notice that you're doing it because it's such a habit. All clutching at your clothes to try and flap some cool air in, And all of you are bright red in the face." Sally, 58”
Caroline Carr, Menopause: The Guide for Real Women

Caroline Carr
“The very best way that you can help yourself is to develop and sustain a positive attitude. The way you think and feel about everything will make all the difference to your experience.”
Caroline Carr, Menopause: The Guide for Real Women

Caroline Carr
“Sometimes the menopause is a nuisance, but on the whole I quite like it. I feel like I'm being 'rounded off.' I just like the feeling of completing a whole area of my life. And then - well, who knows what I might do next? - Benni, 50”
Caroline Carr, Menopause: The Guide for Real Women

Caroline Carr
“Decide to smile and keep upbeat. A scowling, bad-tempered face is far less attractive than a smiling, accepting one.”
Caroline Carr, Menopause: The Guide for Real Women

Caroline Carr
“I went to work wearing a suit and odd shoes. One was blue and one was black. I can't believe I did that. I'm so particular - I would never have done that before. - Les, 48”
Caroline Carr, Menopause: The Guide for Real Women

Caroline Carr
“I drove through red traffic lights once. I thought red meant 'go', which was dreadful because I know red means 'stop'. - Nora, 50”
Caroline Carr, Menopause: The Guide for Real Women

Caroline Carr
“I made a mental note of where I'd parked the car, but when I came out of the precinctI couldn't remember where it was. I pushed a full shopping trolley through acres of busy car park to try to find it, and after 20 minutes I was nearly in tears. Eventually I just stumbled across it, but I don't remember parking there at all. I felt so stupid. What's even worse was that a few weeks later I did exactly the same thing. - Fiona, 56”
Caroline Carr, Menopause: The Guide for Real Women

Caroline Carr
“Sometimes I feel as if there's too much information going into too small a brain. - Paula, 56”
Caroline Carr, Menopause: The Guide for Real Women

Caroline Carr
“Some people assume that there must be something wrong with a relationship if they discover that partners are sleeping separately. But why? OK, human beings have sex and procreate, but whoever said they had to spend the whole night together in the same bed?”
Caroline Carr, Menopause: The Guide for Real Women

Caroline Carr
“When my daughter was 10 she pointed at my face and said accusingly, 'Er - yuk! Witches have those.' I rushed to the mirror. There, sprouting determinedly from a mole on my chin, was a single sprout of hair. I was 45. Caroline, 53”
Caroline Carr, Menopause: The Guide for Real Women

Liane Moriarty
“Nobody had warned her that this would happen during middle age: these sudden, wildly inappropriate waves of desire for young men, with no biological imperative whatsoever.”
Liane Moriarty, Nine Perfect Strangers

“Women become a little dangerous during this time [menopause]..we can no longer keep a lid on it.”
Stephanie Marston, If Not Now, When?: Reclaiming Ourselves at Midlife

Maria Dahvana Headley
“We haven't slept in years. This is an advantage of menopause. Some nights, we meet for coffee at 4:00 a.m.”
Maria Dahvana Headley, The Mere Wife

Heather Corinna
“Messages we get about menopause more often tell us we must keep ourselves from much of what we want and need in this time. It's easy to get the idea that life in and after menopause is going to be little, dreary rituals of desperate maintenance and exacting control over food, exercise, the shape and size of our bodies, our skin, our intimate relationships, our sexuality, our leisure, our moods, robbing us of what pleasure we might have found in these things before.”
Heather Corinna, What Fresh Hell Is This?: Perimenopause, Menopause, Other Indignities, and You

Heather Corinna
“Menopause isn't "Cocoon." Sorry.”
Heather Corinna, What Fresh Hell Is This?: Perimenopause, Menopause, Other Indignities, and You

Heather Corinna
“[As in puberty,] There will be tears. And anger. And tragically unfortunate haircuts.”
Heather Corinna, What Fresh Hell Is This?: Perimenopause, Menopause, Other Indignities, and You

Heather Corinna
“Have no shame ... as another woman friend of mine counseled with perfect sincerity and cheer: 'Just gain the 25 pounds. I really think I would not have survived menopause--AND the death of my mother--without having gained these 25 pounds.' [quoting Sandra Tsing Loh's 'The Madwoman in the Volvo']”
Heather Corinna, What Fresh Hell Is This?: Perimenopause, Menopause, Other Indignities, and You

“I feel as if I have been piling things into my arms for the last twenty years, holding it all,
managing it all, doing it all, being it all and suddenly I am looking at the pile, realizing how much
of it doesn’t belong to me, and hungering to let it drop, to lay it all down, to walk away. I have
learned that when people see you carrying a lot and not dropping anything, that they often
think, “I guess she can hold this for me.” When they see you saying yes, they decide to also ask
you for things. When they see you doing something, they think, “She can do something for me
too.” And, eventually, the load becomes unbearable and you are driven into the ground by a
weight that you have opened your arms to accept.”
Molly Remer, Walking with Persephone

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