Hubris Quotes

Quotes tagged as "hubris" Showing 1-30 of 130
Rick Riordan
“The first lesson every child of Athena learned: Mom was the best at everything, and you should never, ever suggest otherwise.”
Rick Riordan, The Mark of Athena

Rick Riordan
“Annabeth:My fatal flaw. That's what the Sirens showed me. My fatal flaw is hubris.
Percy: the brown stuff they spread on veggie sandwiches?
Annabeth:No, Seaweed Brain. That's HUMMUS. hubris is worse.
Percy: what could be worse than hummus?
Annabeth: Hubris means deadly pride, Percy. Thinking you can do things better than anyone else... Even the gods.”
Rick Riordan, The Sea of Monsters

N.K. Jemisin
“We can never be gods, after all--but we can become something less than human with frightening ease.”
N.K. Jemisin, The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms

Vladimir Nabokov
“I am sufficiently proud of my knowing something to be modest about my not knowing all.”
Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita

Thomas Sowell
“Some of the biggest cases of mistaken identity are among intellectuals who have trouble remembering that they are not God.”
Thomas Sowell

Rick Riordan
“Don't you ever feel like, what if the world really IS messed up? What if we COULD Do it all over again from scratch? No more war. Nobody homeless. No more summer reading homework.
'm listening.
Annabeth: I mean, the West represents a lot of the best things mankind ever did--that's why the fire is still burning. That's why OlympusIs still around. But sometimes you just see the bad stuff, you know? And you start thinking the way Luke does: 'If I could tear this all down, i would do it better.'. Don't you ever feel that way? Like YOU could do a better job I'd you ran the world?
Percy:Um...no. Me running the world would be kind of a nightmare.
Annabeth: then you're lucky. Hubris isn't your fatal flaw.
Percy: what is?
Annabeth: I don't know, Percy, but every hero has one. If you don't find it and learn to control it...well, they don't call it 'fatal' for nothing.
Percy(thinking to himself): I thought about that. It didn't exactly cheer me up.”
Rick Riordan, The Sea of Monsters

Amie Kaufman
“But who names a starship the Icarus? What kind of man possess that much hubris, that he dares it to fall?”
Amie Kaufman, These Broken Stars

Aleister Crowley
“It is the mark of the mind untrained to take its own processes as valid for all men, and its own judgments for absolute truth.”
Aleister Crowley, Magical and Philosophical Commentaries on The Book of the Law

Joseph Campbell
“It may be a species of impudence to think that the way you understand God is the way God is. (60).”
Joseph Campbell, Thou Art That: Transforming Religious Metaphor

George Bernard Shaw
“The true artist will let his wife starve, his children go barefoot, his mother drudge for his living at seventy, sooner than work at anything but his art. To women he is half vivisector, half vampire. He gets into intimate relations with them to study them, to strip the mask of convention from them, to surprise their inmost secrets, knowing that they have the power to rouse his deepest creative energies, to rescue him from his cold reason, to make him see visions and dream dreams, to inspire him, as he calls it. He persuades women that they may do this for their own purpose whilst he really means them to do it for his. He steals the mother’s milk and blackens it to make printer’s ink to scoff at her and glorify ideal women with. He pretends to spare her the pangs of child-bearing so that he may have for himself the tenderness and fostering that belong of right to her children. Since marriage began, the great artist has been known as a bad husband. But he is worse: he is a child-robber, a blood-sucker, a hypocrite, and a cheat. Perish the race and wither a thousand women if only the sacrifice of them enable him to act Hamlet better, to paint a finer picture, to write a deeper poem, a greater play, a profounder philosophy! For mark you, Tavy, the artist’s work is to shew us ourselves as we really are. Our minds are nothing but this knowledge of ourselves; and he who adds a jot to such knowledge creates new mind as surely as any woman creates new men. In the rage of that creation he is as ruthless as the woman, as dangerous to her as she to him, and as horribly fascinating. Of all human struggles there is none so treacherous and remorseless as the struggle between the artist man and the mother woman. Which shall use up the other? that is the issue between them. And it is all the deadlier because, in your romanticist cant, they love one another.”
George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman

Percy Bysshe Shelley
“And on the pedestal these words appear:

'My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:

Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!'

Nothing beside remains.
Round the decay

Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare

The lone and level sands stretch far away.”
Percy Bysshe Shelley, Ozymandias

Vanna Bonta
“People who worship only themselves get a slick, polished look -- like monuments. Too bad they had to go so soon.”
Vanna Bonta, Degrees: Thought Capsules

Philip Pullman
“Religion grants its adherents malign, intoxicating and morally corrosive sensations. Destroying intellectual freedom is always evil, but only religion makes doing evil feel quite so good.”
Philip Pullman

Michael Pollan
“Dreams of innocence are just that; they usually depend on a denial of reality that can be its own form of hubris.”
Michael Pollan, The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals

Francis S. Collins
“There were long stretches of DNA in between genes that didn't seem to be doing very much; some even referred to these as "junk DNA," though a certain amount of hubris was required for anyone to call any part of the genome "junk," given our level of ignorance.”
Francis S. Collins, The Language of God: A Scientist Presents Evidence for Belief

Aeschylus
“And there they ring the walls, the young, the lithe. The handsome hold the graves they won in Troy; the enemy earth rides over those who conquered.

Aeschylus, Agamemnon

Michael Pollan
“In the same way that the picturesque designers were always careful to include some reminder of our mortality in their gardens -- a ruin, sometimes even a dead tree -- the act of leaving parts of the garden untended, and calling attention to its margins, seems to undermine any pretense to perfect power or wisdom on the part of the gardener. The margins of our gardens can be tropes too, but figures of irony rather than transcendence -- antidotes, in fact, to our hubris. It may be in the margins of our gardens that we can discover fresh ways to bring our aesthetics and our ethics about the land into some meaningful alignment.”
Michael Pollan, Second Nature: A Gardener's Education

Dejan Stojanovic
“Even great men bow before the Sun; it melts hubris into humility.”
Dejan Stojanovic

Anatole France
“It is the certainty that they possess the truth that makes men cruel. -Anatole France, novelist, essayist, Nobel laureate (1844-1924)”
Anatole France

Andrew Ross Sorkin
“While the financial crisis destroyed careers and reputations, and left many more bruised and battered, it also left the survivors with a genuine sense of invulnerability at having made it back from the brink. Still missing in the current environment is a genuine sense of humility.”
Andrew Ross Sorkin, Too Big to Fail: The Inside Story of How Wall Street and Washington Fought to Save the Financial System from Crisis — and Themselves

Michel de Montaigne
“Can anything be imagined so ridiculous, that this miserable and wretched creature [man], who is not so much as master of himself, but subject to the injuries of all things, should call himself master and emperor of the world, of which he has not power to know the least part, much less to command the whole?”
Michel de Montaigne, Apology for Raymond Sebond

W. Somerset Maugham
“No egoism is so insufferable as the Christian with regard to his soul.”
W. Somerset Maugham

Barry B. Powell
“Carved on the temple [at Delphi] were the exhortations "Know yourself" and "Nothing too much," mottoes with a similar meaning: You are only human, so don't try more than you are able (or you will pay the price). A recurring theme in Greek myth is the man or woman who loses sight of human limitations and acts arrogantly and with violence, as if immortal. And pays a terrible price.”
Barry B. Powell, Classical Myth

Douglas MacArthur
“People of the Philippines: I have returned. By the grace of Almighty God our forces stand again on Philippine soil—soil consecrated in the blood of our two peoples. We have come dedicated and committed to the task of destroying every vestige of enemy control over your daily lives, and of restoring upon a foundation of indestructible strength, the liberties of your people.”
Douglas MacArthur
tags: hubris

Christopher Peter Grey
“The Duke has decreed that the Castle is not cold." The gentleman's lips are almost blue from this lack of cold. "And the Duke is right and correct in this as in all things."

...some very beautiful tapestries line the walls, but many of them are also full of holes. Perhaps the Duke has decreed that there are no moths, either.”
Christopher Peter Grey, Leonardo's Shadow: Or, My Astonishing Life as Leonardo Da Vinci's Servant

Athanasius Kircher
“Nothing is more beautiful than to know all.”
Athanasius Kircher

Christopher Peter Grey
“The Duke would not pay for the works. He says that the Castle can never be taken. That is called hubris, Giacomo, the belief that you are never wrong. Believing you are never wrong is an error that afflicts great men. I have learned that to be right you must first be wrong many times. Without making errors--and learning from them--a man cannot find the truth.”
Christopher Peter Grey, Leonardo's Shadow: Or, My Astonishing Life as Leonardo Da Vinci's Servant

A.D. Aliwat
“The human mind has a fantastic ability to trick itself out of its own best interests when pride is involved.”
A.D. Aliwat, In Limbo

Homer
“The son of Peleus pressed on in search of glory, bespattering his unconquerable hands with gore.”
Homer, The Iliad

“...of the 10 thopusand Indian soldiers and camp followers who went into captivity at Kut, as few as one third would live to see the war's end.
....Taken to Constantinople, he [Gen. Charles Townshend British Commander of forces surrendered at Kut] spent the remainder of the war in a pleasant villa on an island on the Bosporus, where he was given the use of a Turkish naval yachtand frequently attended diplomatic receptions at the Ottoman court. Joining him in Constantinople were his 3 prized Yorkshire terriers, pets that, despitethe mear-starvation co9nditionsin Kut, had weatheredthe ordeal quite nicely. (p. 178)”
Scott Anderson, Lawrence in Arabia: War, Deceit, Imperial Folly, and the Making of the Modern Middle East

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