Quotes About Gardening

Quotes tagged as "gardening" (showing 1-30 of 192)
Beatrix Potter
“Once upon a time there were four little Rabbits, and their names were--Flopsy, Mopsy, Cottontail, and Peter. ”
Beatrix Potter

Ella Wheeler Wilcox
“A weed is but an unloved flower.”
Ella Wheeler Wilcox

Frances Hodgson Burnett
“However many years she lived, Mary always felt that 'she should never forget that first morning when her garden began to grow'.”
Frances Hodgson Burnett, The Secret Garden

Michael Pollan
“The single greatest lesson the garden teaches is that our relationship to the planet need not be zero-sum, and that as long as the sun still shines and people still can plan and plant, think and do, we can, if we bother to try, find ways to provide for ourselves without diminishing the world. ”
Michael Pollan, The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals

Abraham Lincoln
“The greatest fine art of the future will be the making of a comfortable living from a small piece of land.”
Abraham Lincoln

Claude Monet
“My garden is my most beautiful masterpiece”
Claude Monet

Abraham Cowley
“May I a small house and large garden have;
And a few friends,
And many books, both true.”
Abraham Cowley

Shel Silverstein
“Ol' man Simon, planted a diamond. Grew hisself a garden the likes of none. Sprouts all growin' comin' up glowin' Fruit of jewels all shinin' in the sun. Colors of the rainbow. See the sun and the rain grow sapphires and rubies on ivory vines, Grapes of jade, just ripenin' in the shade, just ready for the squeezin' into green jade wine. Pure gold corn there, Blowin' in the warm air. Ol' crow nibblin' on the amnythyst seeds. In between the diamonds, Ol' man Simon crawls about pullin' out platinum weeds. Pink pearl berries, all you can carry, put 'em in a bushel and haul 'em into town. Up in the tree there's opal nuts and gold pears- Hurry quick, grab a stick and shake some down. Take a silver tater, emerald tomater, fresh plump coral melons. Hangin' in reach. Ol' man Simon, diggin' in his diamonds, stops and rests and dreams about one... real... peach.”
Shel Silverstein, Where the Sidewalk Ends

Horace Walpole
“When people will not weed their own minds, they are apt to be overrun by nettles.”
Horace Walpole

“Doesn't matter what you do, or how you do it, your neighbors are gonna talk about you ANYWAY.”
Felder Rushing

Wendell Berry
“Odd as I am sure it will appear to some, I can think of no better form of personal involvement in the cure of the environment than that of gardening. A person who is growing a garden, if he is growing it organically, is improving a piece of the world. He is producing something to eat, which makes him somewhat independent of the grocery business, but he is also enlarging, for himself, the meaning of food and the pleasure of eating.”
Wendell Berry, The Art of the Commonplace: The Agrarian Essays

Vera Nazarian
“The master of the garden is the one who waters it, trims the branches, plants the seeds, and pulls the weeds. If you merely stroll through the garden, you are but an acolyte.”
Vera Nazarian, The Perpetual Calendar of Inspiration

J.R.R. Tolkien
“For you little gardener and lover of trees, I have only a small gift. Here is set G for Galadriel, but it may stand for garden in your tongue. In this box there is earth from my orchard, and such blessing as Galadriel has still to bestow is upon it. It will not keep you on your road, nor defend you against any peril; but if you keep it and see your home again at last, then perhaps it may reward you. Though you should find all barren and laid waste, there will be few gardens in Middle-earth that will bloom like your garden, if you sprinkle this earth there. Then you may remember Galadriel, and catch a glimpse far off of Lórien, that you have seen only in our winter. For our spring and our summer are gone by, and they will never be seen on earth again save in memory.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

Shannon L. Alder
“It is easier to tell a person what life is not, rather than to tell them what it is. A child understands weeds that grow from lack of attention, in a garden. However, it is hard to explain the wild flowers that one gardener calls weeds, and another considers beautiful ground cover.”
Shannon L. Alder

Walter de la Mare
“A poor old Widow in her weeds
Sowed her garden with wild-flower seeds;
Not too shallow, and not too deep,
And down came April -- drip -- drip -- drip.
Up shone May, like gold, and soon
Green as an arbour grew leafy June.
And now all summer she sits and sews
Where willow herb, comfrey, bugloss blows,
Teasle and pansy, meadowsweet,
Campion, toadflax, and rough hawksbit;
Brown bee orchis, and Peals of Bells;
Clover, burnet, and thyme she smells;
Like Oberon's meadows her garden is
Drowsy from dawn to dusk with bees.
Weeps she never, but sometimes sighs,
And peeps at her garden with bright brown eyes;
And all she has is all she needs --
A poor Old Widow in her weeds.”
Walter de la Mare, Peacock Pie

Michael Pollan
“A garden should make you feel you've entered privileged space -- a place not just set apart but reverberant -- and it seems to me that, to achieve this, the gardener must put some kind of twist on the existing landscape, turn its prose into something nearer poetry.”
Michael Pollan, Second Nature: A Gardener's Education

Edna Ferber
“But always, to her, red and green cabbages were to be jade and burgundy, chrysoprase and prophyry. Life has no weapons against a woman like that.”
Edna Ferber

Kate Morton
“It was such a pleasure to sink one's hands into the warm earth, to feel at one's fingertips the possibilities of the new season.”
Kate Morton, The Forgotten Garden

Edward Thomas
“To-day I think
Only with scents, - scents dead leaves yield,
And bracken, and wild carrot's seed,
And the square mustard field;

Odours that rise
When the spade wounds the root of tree,
Rose, currant, raspberry, or goutweed,
Rhubarb or celery;

The smoke's smell, too,
Flowing from where a bonfire burns
The dead, the waste, the dangerous,
And all to sweetness turns.

It is enough
To smell, to crumble the dark earth,
While the robin sings over again
Sad songs of Autumn mirth."

- A poem called DIGGING.”
Edward Thomas, Collected Poems

Michael Pollan
“Anthropocentric as [the gardener] may be, he recognizes that he is dependent for his health and survival on many other forms of life, so he is careful to take their interests into account in whatever he does. He is in fact a wilderness advocate of a certain kind. It is when he respects and nurtures the wilderness of his soil and his plants that his garden seems to flourish most. Wildness, he has found, resides not only out there, but right here: in his soil, in his plants, even in himself...
But wildness is more a quality than a place, and though humans can't manufacture it, they can nourish and husband it...
The gardener cultivates wildness, but he does so carefully and respectfully, in full recognition of its mystery.”
Michael Pollan, Second Nature: A Gardener's Education

Thomas Jefferson
“The greatest service which can be rendered any country is to add a useful plant to its culture.

--The Fruit Hunters”
Thomas Jefferson, The Quotable Jefferson

“If you wish to make anything grow, you must understand it, and understand it in a very real sense. 'Green fingers' are a fact, and a mystery only to the unpracticed. But green fingers are the extensions of a verdant heart.”
Russell Page, The Education of a Gardener

Elizabeth Hoyt
“A garden always has a point.”
Elizabeth Hoyt, The Raven Prince

Michael Pollan
“The green thumb is equable in the face of nature's uncertainties; he moves among her mysteries without feeling the need for control or explanations or once-and-for-all solutions. To garden well is to be happy amid the babble of the objective world, untroubled by its refusal to be reduced by our ideas of it, its indomitable rankness.”
Michael Pollan, Second Nature: A Gardener's Education

“I love spring anywhere, but if I could choose I would always greet it in a garden.”
Ruth Stout

Parker J. Palmer
“We are exploring together. We are cultivating a garden together, backs to the sun. The question is a hoe in our hands and we are digging beneath the hard and crusty surface to the rich humus of our lives.”
Parker J. Palmer, Let Your Life Speak: Listening for the Voice of Vocation

Michael Pollan
“Tree planting is always a utopian enterprise, it seems to me, a wager on a future the planter doesn't necessarily expect to witness.”
Michael Pollan, Second Nature: A Gardener's Education

Rebecca Solnit
“All gardening is landscape painting,' said Alexander Pope.”
Rebecca Solnit, Wanderlust: A History of Walking

Jasper Fforde
“I've got six months to sort out the hackers, get the Japanese knotweed under control and find an acceptable form of narcissus.”
Jasper Fforde, Lost in a Good Book

« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7
All Quotes | My Quotes | Add A Quote


Browse By Tag

More...