Athena Quotes

Quotes tagged as "athena" Showing 1-30 of 62
Rick Riordan
“What if it lines up like it did in the Trojan War ... Athena versus Poseidon?"
"I don't know. But I just know that I'll be fighting next to you."
"Why?"
"Because you're my friend, Seaweed Brain. Any more stupid questions?”
Rick Riordan, The Lightning Thief

Rick Riordan
“Can you surf really well, then?"
I looked at Grover, who was trying hard not to laugh.
"Jeez, Nico," I said. "I've never really tried."
He went on asking questions. Did I fight a lot with Thalia, since she was a daughter of Zeus? (I didn't answer that one.) If Annabeth's mother was Athena, the goddess of wisdom, then why didn't Annabeth know better than to fall off a cliff? (I tried not to strangle Nico for asking that one.) Was Annabeth my girlfriend? (At this point, I was ready to stick the kid in a meat-flavored sack and throw him to the wolves.)”
Rick Riordan

Rick Riordan
“Remind me again-why do you hate me so much?"

I don't hate you."

Could've fooled me."

She folded her cap of invisibility. "Look...we're just not supposed to get along, okay? Our parents are rivals."

Why?"

She sighed. "How many reasons do you want? One time my mom caught Poseidon with his girlfriend in Athena's temple, which is hugely disrespectful. Another time, Athena and Poseidon competed to be the patron god for the city of Athens. Your dad created some stupid saltwater spring for his gift. My mom created the olive tree. The people saw that her gift was better, so they named the city after her."

They must really like olives."

Oh, forget it."

Now, if she'd invented pizza-that I could understand.”
Rick Riordan, The Lightning Thief

Rick Riordan
“Hey, can I see that sword you were using?"
I showed him Riptide, and explained how it turned from a pen into a sword just by uncapping it.
"Cool! Does it ever run out of ink?"
"Um, well, I don't actually write with it."
"Are you really the son of Poseidon?"
"Well, yeah."
"Can you surf really well, then?"
I looked at Grover, who was trying hard not to laugh.
"Jeez, Nico," I said. "I've never really tried."
He went on asking questions. Did I fight a lot with Thalia, since she was a daughter of Zeus? (I didn't answer that one.) If Annabeth's mother was Athena, the goddess of wisdom, then why didn't Annabeth know better than to fall off a cliff? (I tried not to strangle Nico for asking that one.) Was Annabeth my girlfriend? (At this point, I was ready to stick the kid in a meat-flavored sack and throw him to the wolves.)”
Rick Riordan, The Titan's Curse

Rick Riordan
“The first lesson every child of Athena learned: Mom was the best at everything, and you should never, ever suggest otherwise.”
Rick Riordan, The Mark of Athena

Rick Riordan
“There is always a way out for those clever enough to find it.”
Rick Riordan, The Titan's Curse

Rick Riordan
“She studied me with concern. She touched the new streak of gray in my hair that matched hers exactly—our painful souvenir from holding Atlas's burden. There was a lot I'd wanted to say to Annabeth, but Athena had taken the confidence out of me. I felt like I'd been punched in the gut.
I do not approve of your friendship with my daughter.
"So," Annabeth said. "What did you want to tell me earlier?"
The music was playing. People were dancing in the streets. I said, "I, uh, was thinking we got interrupted at Westover Hall. And… I think I owe you a dance."
She smiled slowly. "All right, Seaweed Brain."
So I took her hand, and I don't know what everybody else heard, but to me it sounded like a slow dance: a little sad, but maybe a little hopeful, too.”
Rick Riordan, The Titan's Curse

Rick Riordan
“I've been waiting a long time for a quest, seaweed brain," she said. "Athena is no fan of Poseidon, but if you're going to save the world, I'm the best person to keep you from messing up.”
Rick Riordan, The Lightning Thief

Rick Riordan
“Athena called, "Annabeth Chase, my own daughter."
Annabeth squeezed my arm, then walked forward and knelt at her mother's feet.
Athena smiled. "You, my daughter, have exceeded all expectations. You have used your wits, your strength, and your courage to defend this city, and our seat of power. It has come to our attention that Olympus is...well, trashed. The Titan lord did much damage that will have to be repaired. We could rebuild it by magic, of course, and make it just as it was. But the gods feel that the city could be improved. We will take this as an opportunity. And you, my daughter, will design these improvements."
Annabeth looked up, stunned. "My...my lady?"
Athena smiled wryly. "You are an architect, are you not? You have studied the techniques of Daedalus himself. Who better to redesign Olympus and make it a monument that will last for another eon?"
"You mean...I can design whatever I want?"
"As your heart desires," the goddess said. "Make us a city for the ages."
"As long as you have plenty of statues of me," Apollo added.
"And me," Aphrodite agreed.
"Hey, and me!" Ares said. "Big statues with huge wicked swords and-"
All right!" Athena interrupted. "She gets the point. Rise, my daughter, official architect of Olympus.”
Rick Riordan, The Last Olympian

Rick Riordan
“Athena stood in the middle of the road with her arms crossed and a look on her face that made me think Uh-oh. She'd changed out of her armor, into jeans and a white blouse, but she didn't look any less warlike. Her gray eyes blazed.
"Well, Percy," she said. "You will stay mortal."
"Um, yes, ma'am."
"I would know your reasons."
"I want to be a regular guy. I want to grow up. Have, you know, a regular high school experience."
"And my daughter?"
"I couldn't leave her," I admitted, my throat dry. "Or Grover," I added quickly. "Or-"
"Spare me." Athena stepped close to me, and I could feel her aura of power making my skin itch. "I once warned you, Percy Jackson, that to save a friend you would destroy the world. Perhaps I was mistaken. You seem to have saved both your friends and the world. But think very carefully about how you proceed from here. I have given you the benefit of the doubt. Don't mess up."
Just to prove her point, she erupted in a column of flame, charring the front of my shirt.”
Rick Riordan, The Last Olympian

Rick Riordan
“People usually asked her if she had a belly button. Of course she had a belly button. She couldn't explain how. She didn't really want to know.”
Rick Riordan, The Mark of Athena

Rick Riordan
“The most dangerous flaws are those which are good in moderation," she said. "Evil is easy to fight. Lack of wisdom… that is very hard indeed.”
Rick Riordan, The Titan's Curse

Rick Riordan
“Wisdom's daughter walks alone.
That didn't just mean without other people, Annabeth realized. It meant without any special powers.”
Rick Riordan, The Mark of Athena

Rick Riordan
“your loved ones have been used to lure you into Kronos's traps. Your fatal flaw is personal loyalty Percy. You do not know when it is time to cut your losses. To save a friend you would sacrifice the world.”
Rick Riordan, The Titan's Curse

Paulo Coelho
“They went to university because someone, at a time when universities seemed important, said that in order to rise in the world, you had to have a degree. And thus the world was deprived of some excellent gardeners, bakers, antique dealers, sculptors, and writers.”
Paulo Coelho, The Witch of Portobello
tags: 28, athena

“Forget diamonds or dogs—a girl or boy's best friend is always a high-powered weapon.”
Sarah A. Hoyt, DarkShip Thieves

Sherrilyn Kenyon
“Athena came to stand by her side. She reached out and ran a light touch over the read wrap. 'Nice dress."
Grace frowned in disbelief. 'They're fighting to the death and you're admiring my clothes?'
Athena laughed. 'Trust me, I pick my generals well. Priapus doesn't stand a chance.”
Sherrilyn Kenyon, Fantasy Lover

Alexandra Bracken
“Bind your fate to mine.”
Alexandra Bracken, Lore

Alexandra Bracken
“This vessel requires sustenance."
"You want... breakfast?" Lore guessed.”
Alexandra Bracken, Lore

Kendare Blake
“It’s a hard choice, but this is why I lead. No one else has the stomach to do the unpleasant things that sometimes need doing.”
Kendare Blake, Antigoddess
tags: athena

Rick Riordan
“That's why the city is named Athens, after her, when it could have been named something cool like Poseidonopolis.”
Rick Riordan, Percy Jackson's Greek Gods

Rick Riordan
“I said warfare and wisdom," Athena explained. "I'll oversee the kind of combat that requires planning, craftiness, and high intelligence. You can still be in charge of the stupid, bloody, 'manly man' aspects of war."

"Oh, all right," said Ares. Then he frowned. "Wait...what?
Rick Riordan, Percy Jackson's Greek Gods

Jen Calonita
“I can see the thickness to your skin, Megara. You are tough. Courageous. Proud. I will assist you however I can."
Meg had heard tales of Athena helping those on heroic endeavors, but she'd never imagined she'd be worthy of such a thing.”
Jen Calonita, Go the Distance

Rick Riordan
“I will claim you as my own, and name you Erikthonius."
(She gets one chance to name a kid and that's what she picks? Don't ask me.”
Rick Riordan, Percy Jackson's Greek Gods

Rick Riordan
“I will claim you as my own, and name you Erikthonius."
(She gets one chance to name a kid and that's what she picks? Don't ask me.)”
Rick Riordan, Percy Jackson's Greek Gods

Rick Riordan
“I will claim you as my own, and name you Erikthonius."
(She gets one chance to name a kid and that's what she picks? Don't ask me.)”
Rick Riordan, Percy Jackson's Greek Gods

Rick Riordan
“Besides, I'm dating one of Athena's daughters, and I'm pretty sure she didn't spring from a dirty handkerchief.
Hmm. Actually, I've never asked her.
Nah, forget it. I don't want to know.”
Rick Riordan, Percy Jackson's Greek Gods

“My fingers on her breasts, our mouths joined;
I graze with deep fury on her silver neck;
yet though I labor over Aphrogeneia
this virgin lets me go so far—and denies
me her bed. Her upper body she allows
to Aphrodite, but her under parts she commits
to chaste Athena. I waste away between.”
Paulus Silentiarius

T.H. White
“So it is with humans. We cannot hear the trees talking, except as a vague noise of roaring and hushing which we attribute to the wind in the leaves, because they talk too slowly for us. These noises are really the syllables and vowels of the trees. "You may speak for yourselves," said Athene.
Oak spoke first, as became the noblest of all. He stood throbbing his leaves in the twilight, to which Time had mixed down day and night; stretching out his great muscular branches; yawning, as it were, like a noble giant of the earth who cracks his limbs in the morning when he wakes. "Ah," said the oak. "It's good to be alive. Look at my biceps, will you? Do you see how the other trees are afraid of Gravity, afraid that he will break their branches off? They point
them up in the air, or down at the ground, so as to give the old earth-giant his least purchase upon them. Now I am ready to challenge Gravity, and I can stretch my branches straight out in a line parallel to the earth. He may
swing on them for all I care, but, bless you, they won't break. Do you know how long I live? A thousand years is my expectation. Three hundred years to grow, three hundred years to live, and three hundred years to die. And
when I am dead, what of that? They make me into timber, into ships and house beams that will be good for another thousand. My leaves come the last and go the last. I am a conservative, I am; and out of my apples they
make ink, whose words may live as long as me, even as me, the oak.”
T.H. White, The Sword in the Stone

Bertrand Russell
“...Atina gibi, Floransa gibi küçük bir site devletinin ileri gelen bir vatandaşının kendini önemli bir kişi gibi hissetmesi o kadar zor olmazdı. O zamanlarda dünya evrenin merkezi, insanoğlu da yaratılışın amacıydı; o çağda yaşayan insan ise kendi sitesinin en mükemmel insanları barındırdığını, kendisinin ise, kendi sitesinin en mükemmel insanları arasında olduğunu düşünebiliyordu. Bu durumda Aeskilos ya da Dante, kendi sevinç ya da üzüntülerini ciddiye alabilirdi. Aeskilos da, Dante de, tek tek insanların duygularının önem taşıdığı ve trajik olayların ölümsüz şiirle yüceltilmeye layık olduğu inancını besleyebilirdi. Halbuki modern insan, bahtsızlığa uğradığı zaman, kendini istatistik toplamın bir parçası gibi hisseder; geçmiş ve gelecek onun önünde, saçma ve önemsiz yenilgilerin meydana getirdiği ürkütücü alaylar halinde uzar. İnsanoğlunun kendi de, sonsuz sessizlikler arasında kısa bir süre için bağırıp çağıran, yaygaralar koparan az çok saçma, çalımlı bir hayvan gibi görünür. Kral Lear, "Gerekli ihtiyaçları sağlanmamış insan, zavallı, çıplak, oklanmış bir hayvandan farksızdır," der ve bu fikir alışılmamış bir şey olduğundan onu deliliğe sürükler. Ne var ki, bu fikir modern insan için alışılmış bir şeydir ve onu sadece saçmalığa sürükler...”
Bertrand Russell, In Praise of Idleness and Other Essays

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