Quotes About Hospice

Quotes tagged as "hospice" (showing 1-30 of 30)
“I wonder if my first breath was as soul-stirring to my mother as her last breath was to me. – From 14 Days: A Mother, A Daughter, A Two-Week Goodbye”
Lisa Goich

Lisa Goich-Andreadis
“I wonder if my first breath was as soul-stirring to my mother as her last breath was to me. – From 14 Days: A Mother, A Daughter, A Two-Week Goodbye”
Lisa Goich-Andreadis, 14 Days: A Mother, A Daughter, A Two Week Goodbye

Rachel Joyce
“Queenie Hennessy - "I am here to die."
Sister Mary Inconnue - "Pardon me but you are here to live until you die. There is a significant difference.”
Rachel Joyce, The Love Song of Miss Queenie Hennessy

Milkweed L. Augustine
“There is absolutely no way someone cannot be affected, or cannnot learn vital lessons by being forced to dwell in the margins of a hindering repose as the one loved by so very few."

Dying and Loving It”
Milkweed L. Augustine

Kate McGahan
“I knew then why I had to suffer. The older we get, the more reasons God gives us to seek His comfort. In the end, He sends us just enough pain and suffering so that we will want to leave. If everything were perfect, we would never choose to go. He wants us to seek an end to our suffering because He wants us to want to come Home.”
Kate McGahan, JACK McAFGHAN: Reflections on Life with My Master

Molly Friedenfeld
“Angels of highest light and love,
Angels that radiate beams of pure energy from the heavens above.

Please join us and be with us on this very night,
As the soul of our beloved joins you in flight.

We pray that you send this soul embraced in your lovely wings,
During his journey may he hear harps, and trumpets and strings.”
Molly Friedenfeld, The Book of Simple Human Truths

Christine Cowgill
“Death should not be viewed as a medical failure but as a natural conclusion to life.”
Christine Cowgill, Soul Service: A Hospice Guide to the Emotional and Spiritual Care for the Dying

Thomas Hager
“Where there were once several competing approaches to medicine, there is now only one that matters to most hospitals, insurers, and the vast majority of the public. One that has been shaped to a great degree by the successful development of potent cures that followed the discovery of sulfa drugs. Aspiring caregivers today are chosen as much (or more) for their scientific abilities, their talent for mastering these manifold technological and pharmaceutical advances as for their interpersonal skills. A century ago most physicians were careful, conservative observers who provided comfort to patients and their families. Today they act: They prescribe, they treat, they cure. They routinely perform what were once considered miracles. The result, in the view of some, has been a shift in the profession from caregiver to technician. The powerful new drugs changed how care was given as well as who gave it.”
Thomas Hager, The Demon Under the Microscope: From Battlefield Hospitals to Nazi Labs, One Doctor's Heroic Search for the World's First Miracle Drug

Molly Friedenfeld
“Spending moments with another in earnest presence is one of the simple ways we can show unconditional love. It is the memories created from these impressions that survive after all else passes.”
Molly Friedenfeld

“If we listen and observe carefully the dying can teach us important things that we need to learn in preparing for the end of our own life's journey.”
Robert L. Wise, Crossing the Threshold of Eternity: What the Dying Can Teach the Living

“There is one essential requirement for being close with a dying person: the letting go of self-concern.”
Robert Martensen, A Life Worth Living: A Doctor's Reflections on Illness in a High-Tech Era

“.....listening means learning to hear someone's inner world and deepest feelings with far greater attention in order that we don't let our own assumptions get in the way. The dying may speak in images far more akin to dreamland than the world of everyday reality. In order to understand them we have to make adjustments to comprehend a poetic form of expression that is sometimes elusive but actually far more expressive than the world of facts.”
Robert L. Wise, Crossing the Threshold of Eternity: What the Dying Can Teach the Living

Lisa J. Shultz
“When I reflect on the stories of death supported by hospice care and contrast it with our story depicting an absence of support, I find myself dealing with envy and anger. I have channeled those emotions into this book with the hope that hearing our story might give someone else a chance to create a better ending to the life of a loved one.”
Lisa J. Shultz, A Chance to Say Goodbye: Reflections on Losing a Parent

Molly Friedenfeld
“The kindness sent from one compassionate soul to another during the time of loss of one held so dear allows the sorrow-filled heart to open wide, filling the space of emptiness that grief may have created with a renewed sense of peace, compassion, and love.”
Molly Friedenfeld, The Book of Simple Human Truths

Kimberly D. Acquaviva
“If your organization is not formally committed to a policy of nondiscrimination based on sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender expression or gender presentation in its employment practices, you should not expect lesbian,
gay, bisexual, transgender, gender-nonconforming, queer, and/or questioning patients and families to feel safe seeking out your services.”
Kimberly D. Acquaviva, LGBTQ-Inclusive Hospice and Palliative Care: A Practical Guide to Transforming Professional Practice

Cheryl Strayed
“The bullet hit Lady right between her eyes, in the middle of her white star, exactly where we hoped it would. She bolted so hard her leather halter snapped into pieces and fell away from her face, and then she stood unmoving, looking at us with a stunned expression.

"Shoot her again," I gasped, and immediately Leif did, firing three more bullets into her head in quick succession. She stumbled and jerked, but she didn't fall and she didn't run, though she was no longer tied to the tree. Her eyes were wild upon us, shocked by what we'd done, her face a constellation of bloodless holes. In an instant I knew we'd done the wrong thing, not in killing her, but in thinking that we should be the ones to do it. I should have insisted Eddie do this one thing, or paid for the veterinarian to come out. I'd had the wrong idea of what it takes to kill an animal. There is no such thing as one clean shot.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail

Lisa J. Shultz
“A paradigm shift of viewing palliative care or hospice as a gift instead of seeing it as giving up has the potential to change the way we experience advanced age.”
Lisa J. Shultz, A Chance to Say Goodbye: Reflections on Losing a Parent

Brent Green
“Suffering creates a vivid contrast illuminating joy, happiness, and satisfaction. It is a harsh lesson on the other side of sublime. We all must suffer, whether we choose to or not. There must be value in that which is given in our lives, even though we hope and try to live joyfully and enjoy our brief time on earth.”
Brent Green, Questions of the Spirit: The Quest for Understanding at a Time of Loss

Joe Niemczura
“Every woman deserves the simple dignity of dying in a bed with clean sheets and an electric light at hand.'

-spoken by Sara, the missionary doctor, during a moment of indignation.”
Joe Niemczura, The Sacrament of the Goddess

Alysia Abbott
“Of course, it’s now obvious why he was so angry that day. People don’t move into hospice to live but to die. And that half an egg sandwich I ended up making him–that sandwich was the last meal he ate in our Haight-Ashbury apartment, our one true home.”
Alysia Abbott, Fairyland: A Memoir of My Father

Kimberly D. Acquaviva
“Sexual health is as achievable and reasonable a goal for patients in palliative care and hospice care as pain relief, but few hospice and palliative care professionals include sexual health within their assessment and plan of care. Given that
sexuality is a central aspect of being human, sexual health should be part of the assessment and plan for every patient
receiving palliative care and hospice care.”
Kimberly D. Acquaviva, LGBTQ-Inclusive Hospice and Palliative Care: A Practical Guide to Transforming Professional Practice

Kimberly D. Acquaviva
“Changing the way LGBTQ individuals
with chronic or life-limiting illnesses are cared for requires a paradigm shift in the way we (collectively, as health care professionals) approach the conversation about what it means to be inclusive in our compassion. You don’t need to change your religious or moral beliefs to provide good care to LGBTQ individuals.”
Kimberly D. Acquaviva, LGBTQ-Inclusive Hospice and Palliative Care: A Practical Guide to Transforming Professional Practice

Justin Madson
“One of my pa...friends... isn't doing very well."

"...Is your friend dying?"

"...Yes honey, he is."

"That's sad.”
Justin Madson, Breathers

Kimberly D. Acquaviva
“CAMPERS is a seven-step process you can use to improve your ability to provide inclusive, nonjudgmental care when you are planning, engaging in, and reflecting on a patient interaction. The letters in the mnemonic device stand for: clear purpose, attitudes and beliefs, mitigation plan, patient, emotions, reactions, and strategy.”
Kimberly D. Acquaviva, LGBTQ-Inclusive Hospice and Palliative Care: A Practical Guide to Transforming Professional Practice

Mark Doty
“I’d write and read and let myself, a little at a time, step down into myself- like a stairway down into a dark, intimate kiva- where the work of vigil is taking place, the necessary attending. I imagine there’s a little fire burning in there, a few steadily glowing embers, and a quiet chant going on, from me, from some singer in me, honoring and accompanying W’s soul, which is with him as he is making his passage. ..there’s a leavetaking in process, a movement towards increasing simplicity, away from complexity, activity, expectation. The bout of paranoia, with a childlike quality of being threatened, seems part of that-like a day or two when he couldn’t just let go and float on the energies of other people, who are bearing him up-but had to doubt them, struggle. So much better when he can trust and float. There’s enough love around him to carry him now…”
Mark Doty, Heaven's Coast: A Memoir

Joe Niemczura
“To transport this way along bouncy mountain roads is not the way to die. Every woman deserves the simple dignity of dying in a bed with clean sheets and an electric light at hand. They wanted me to participate in a horrible abomination. I simply will not countenance the lack of respect for the poor mother of those boys. Imagine how she would feel if she woke up and saw her sons piled at her side."
-spoken by Sara to Matt regarding a victim of Amanita Phalloides [poisoning”
Joe Niemczura, The Sacrament of the Goddess

Brent Green
“Suffering can precipitate creativity, liberating the creator through inspiration and then many available channels of human communication, and therefore there is value in suffering.”
Brent Green, Questions of the Spirit: The Quest for Understanding at a Time of Loss

Brent Green
“I felt great empathy for my friend, as one form of cancer after another emerged to challenge him. I felt sympathy for his suffering that surely clawed at his daily routines, always active and busy, but he rarely verbalized complaints while courageously challenging his archenemy. He met pain and physical decline with 600-calorie workouts; he discarded anxieties somewhere along innumerable running trails; he faced death by running through life at full stride.”
Brent Green, Questions of the Spirit: The Quest for Understanding at a Time of Loss

Brent Green
“My encounter with desperation while witnessing the death of a precious child changed me, teaching me that although we will have sad times, we can move on, chastened and changed but resilient and hopeful. Laurel showed me one way to live with hope as well as cancer as she thrived even when tumors grew within her small body. She exhibited how a child can push aside despair and appreciate as many moments as possible, to believe in the power of resurrection, both the human spirit and in a Biblical sense.”
Brent Green, Questions of the Spirit: The Quest for Understanding at a Time of Loss

Anne Clendening
“Hospice care? No, you must mean Frisbee game. Because there's no way my brother and I aren't outside right now playing Frisbee in the middlle of the street in the middle of summer and there are weird bugs everywhere no matter how much bug spray we put on ourselves and our mom is coming out to tell us for the third and final time, C'mon inside kids, it's getting dark.”
Anne Clendening, Bent: How Yoga Saved My Ass

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