Ghouls Quotes

Quotes tagged as "ghouls" (showing 1-23 of 23)
“I come from a long line of body snatchers, probably the top-notch body snatchers in America. No make that the world. Some people might think it's gross digging up bones or corpses, but who asked them? It's no big deal, but then I've been doing it since I got out of diapers.”
Minda Webber

Rusty Fischer
“If I've got a Dad, and his name is Wormwood Rot, and he's in some heavy metal rock band called Grave Dirt . . . then I'm definitely meeting him!
She stares at me awkwardly, and I'm about to ask again—maybe even insist—when she says, "Honey, why do you think he's on the news? Wormwood, I mean . . . your father? Becca, he's . . . dead.”
Rusty Fischer, Becca Bloom and the Drumsticks of Doom: A Heavy Metal Love Story

Rusty Fischer
“He's reading a book called Great Warlocks of the 18th Century, and to get this ball rolling before Dean Devlin shows up and rains on our private parade, I snort and ask, "Good book?"
I forget I'm pretending to be sitting behind my two-thousand-ninety-eight-page Highlights of Modern Chemistry book, so he snorts back. "Better than yours.”
Rusty Fischer, Becca Bloom and the Drumsticks of Doom: A Heavy Metal Love Story

Rusty Fischer
“Some sample lyrics I think I catch: "My engine races up to seventh gear; wrap your legs around my engine, dear . . . . The tunnel's dark, but the ground is wet; I lubricate it with my dripping sweat!"
Or, something vaguely disturbing and gross like that; it's hard to tell with the wailing guitars and the front man screaming through his ravaged vocal chords.”
Rusty Fischer, Becca Bloom and the Drumsticks of Doom: A Heavy Metal Love Story

Rupert Thomson
“The earthquakes in people's heads, half the city's population was cracked, a rabble of doom-merchants, psychos, ghouls. They could smell a funeral a mile off, and out they crawled, out of the woodwork. A funeral lit them up, it was like fuel, it kept them burning for days.”
Rupert Thomson, The Five Gates of Hell

Robert Dunbar
“The original Gothic horror tales focused on personalities deformed through loneliness. Ghouls, vampires, werewolves: all made, not born. But the isolation? Are even such as these ever truly alone? Perhaps the psyche has always been more complex than that, desire eternally more potent than terror. Surely, none prowl entirely in solitude.”
Robert Dunbar, Martyrs and Monsters

“It's Halloween,
The night we all play,
Trick or treat,
We won't go away.
Be we ghoul or goblin, ghost,
We'll knock on your door,
To see who scares you the most.
But cringe not in fear,
Or cry out in pain,
Cause it's only a game,
Oh, what a shame.
But don't despair,
In the cold night air,
Because we'll be back,
And then you'll be scared!
But not just one,
Or even two.
And so we bid you,
A sweet adieu.”
Anthony T. Hincks

Nathan Reese Maher
“Because I am, just as you are you. We don’t always get to pick who we are, Shelly Wynn, but we can choose to celebrate it.”
Nathan Reese Maher, Lights Out: Book 2

Nathan Reese Maher
“The shadow self is what lies beneath the makeup. It’s those ugly parts that you haven’t accepted about yourself. You hide those parts in the shadows until you’re ready.” Her face remained a haunting calm. “When you realize the scars are who you are, that there was nothing wrong with you and that you were beautiful all along - that’s when you decide to take the makeup off.”
Nathan Reese Maher, Lights Out: Book 2

Nathan Reese Maher
“Patches don’t look it, but when attached to your soul they can get pretty heavy. They go over the holes in your soul, like when you patch a sock. When you have a hole in your soul, it’s because you’re hurting from something. I don’t know if you noticed, but that girl had a lot of holes.”
Nathan Reese Maher, Lights Out: Book 2

Nathan Reese Maher
“There’s nothing wrong with you at all. Sometimes people say or do things that are mean because there's something the matter with them. With Lydia, it seems there’s always something wrong with her.”
Nathan Reese Maher, Lights Out: Book 2

“Am I still scared of the dark?
Yes!
Because it is all around us.”
Anthony T.Hincks

Nathan Reese Maher
“I’m afraid they’re not coming.” Abby said fearfully. “Our parents, our teachers – everyone! They’ve disappeared. That’s it. Lights out, Shelly. We’re on our own.”
Nathan Reese Maher, Lights Out: Book 2

Nathan Reese Maher
“It’s no big deal. It’s kind of like a tattoo. It won’t hurt, not too much, just a few stitches and it’ll be all over. It’s really interesting how it’s done. You won’t believe where your soul hides. Go on, take a guess. Where do you think it is?”
Nathan Reese Maher, Lights Out: Book 2

Nathan Reese Maher
“Aloha Oukou. It looked like your soul was escaping so I put you in a tree.”
Nathan Reese Maher, Lights Out: Book 2

Nathan Reese Maher
“She could spin it between her legs, skip with it, twirl it around her neck and transfer it from one arm to the other. Shelly hooped because she enjoyed it; it calmed her whenever she would have an argument or a bad day at school, and it also allowed her to think. Today, she needed to hoop more than ever.”
Nathan Reese Maher, Lights Out: Book 2

Nathan Reese Maher
“Somehow her hula hoop had cut into the driver’s side door like the vehicle was made of cheese.”
Nathan Reese Maher, Lights Out: Book 2

Nathan Reese Maher
“Soon, all the children were chanting it. “No school! No school!”
Nathan Reese Maher, Lights Out: Book 2

Edward Lucas White
“He told countless tales, all good, of crocodiles and ichneumons in Egypt, gazelles and ghouls in Persia, elephants and tigers in Burmah, deer and monkeys in Siam, badgers and foxes in China and sorcerers and enchanters everywhere. He spoke of the last two in as matter-of-fact a tone as of any of the others.”
Edward Lucas White, The Stuff of Dreams: The Weird Stories of Edward Lucas White

Neil Gaiman
“And all the ghouls around the coffin-wood fire howled at this statement, and growled and sang and exclaimed at how wise they were, and how mighty, and how fine it was to be scared of nothing.”
Neil Gaiman, The Graveyard Book
tags: ghouls

Amanda M. Lyons
“Rushing out the door on his way back to the street, he ran into someone with his shoulder. Turning to apologize to them, he stopped, horrified at what he saw.
It was the white-eyed man he’d met a week ago.
“Watch your back.” He said standing there just long enough for Raven to take in the meat between his teeth, the milky, nearly opaque color of his eyes and the madness within them. Then, after only a few seconds, he was gone, vanished into the crowd as if he had never existed.
Certain his mind was playing tricks and tired of being terrified for his sanity, he headed down the street as fast as he could in pursuit. As he rushed through the tightly packed crowd, he saw others like the man he’d just seen, and each of their white eyes gazed blankly into his. A woman here, a hunched drifter there, shapes and faces that shifted and darted all around him. “Watch your back.” They hissed, and he tried to move faster, his heart racing and the nerves of his body jangling painfully with fear as he fought to get beyond them.
Hands reached out for his clothes, pulling him in different directions as they tugged and he struggled to be free. Their fingers felt like talons clasped into the folds and gaps of his clothing, ripping and popping stitches in their fervor to gain some small grasp on his flesh beneath his jacket. Along with the horror of their cold, dead eyes, he could smell some strangeness—a sickly sweet smell of rot and decay only barely closeted by preserving fluids. The smell dug into his sinuses as their fingers and hands dug at him. He gagged, his teeth clenched tight as he exerted energy he didn’t really have. He pushed away from them and on through the empty space he saw at the end of this group of pedestrians. Many of whom mingled with what he now felt must be the dead, wholly unaware of why he flailed and pushed against them.”
Amanda M. Lyons

Nathan Reese Maher
“Shelly shook her head and made sure she had plenty of space so that she wouldn’t hit anything. As many times before, she kept the hoop close to her waist and then twirled it with small, tight bursts of speed. As the hoop gathered in momentum it started to give off a hum that soon took on a light blue illumination far brighter than the streetlamps. It was so bright, that it lit up the entire backyard.”
Nathan Reese Maher, Lights Out: Book 2