Dolls Quotes

Quotes tagged as "dolls" (showing 1-30 of 42)
Stephen King
“Dolls with no little girls around to mind them were sort of creepy under any conditions.”
Stephen King, Desperation

Tim Cummings
“It’s easier for me to make sense of it that way than it is for me to face the other way—reality. And yet, those evil spirits that were unleashed—be they fake entities from a stupid carnival ride, or cruel malevolencies from dark spiritual chasms of our universe—have stayed with me all these years”
Tim Cummings, ORPHANS

Tim Cummings
“I leave the kitchen table to bathe, and to dress for church. If only my closet held on its shelves an array of faces I could wear rather than dresses, I would know which face to put on today. As for the dresses, I haven't a clue.”
Tim Cummings, ORPHANS

Tim Cummings
“Listen, we’ll come visit you. Okay? I’ll dress up as William Shakespeare, Lucent as Emily Dickinson, and beautiful ‘Ray’ as someone dashing and manly like Jules Verne or Ernest Hemingway...and we’ll write on your white-room walls. We’ll write you out of your supposed insanity. I love you, Micky Affias.

-James (from "Descendants of the Eminent")”
Tim Cummings

A.K. Kuykendall
“Time is tick, tick, ticking away. How many souls will I capture today? Will they be a challenge or will they be given? Only time will tell as the clock keeps tick, tick, ticking. Your god has arrived with enough hatred for y’all, with enough evil for the big and small, so come one, come all. I will shred your souls and place them in my satchel, call you a settler and make you my peddler. Come one, come all, come stand behind your god. I will lead you into the darkness of Earth's end. Come one, come all, my wilted flowers, come claim your title, speak out and cheer it. Come one, come all, let’s have a ball, my wilted flowers . . . Sweet, Unconquerable Spirits.”
A.K. Kuykendall, The Possession

Eula Biss
“In the past few decades quite a few people have suggested -- citing most often the offence of impossible proportions -- that Barbie dolls teach young girls to hate themselves. But the opposite may be true. British researchers recently found that girls between the ages of seven and eleven harbor surprisingly strong feelings of dislike for their Barbie dolls, with no other toy or brand name inspiring such a negative response from the children. The dolls "provoked rejection, hatred, and violence" and many girls preferred Barbie torture -- by cutting, burning, decapitating, or microwaving -- over other ways of playing with the doll. Reasons that the girls hated their Barbies included, somewhat poetically, the fact that they were 'plastic.' The researchers also noted that the girls never spoke of one single, special Barbie, but tended to talk about having a box full of anonymous Barbies. 'On a deeper level Barbie has become inanimate,' one of the researchers remarked. 'She has lost any individual warmth that she might have possessed if she were perceived as a singular person. This may go some way towards explaining the violence and torture.”
Eula Biss, The Best American Nonrequired Reading 2009

Kate Bernheimer
“Thankfully, the farmers understand my request that the children not be allowed to peer through the windows at me.
It would be alarming for them to see me with their dolls, to see me using the knife on their faces. There are some things children never should see.”
Kate Bernheimer, The Complete Tales of Lucy Gold

Todd McFarlane
“This is an odd one. You have one country in the world where a word has a deeper meaning, it can really mess with design plans. ...But we have a difficult situation here so I guess we'll be looking at putting different sound chips in the dolls heading there [Britain].”
Todd McFarlane

“Become a dollmaker, there are NO limits to your awesomeness, you can create anything you can imagine and more!”
Gayle Wray

Nathan Reese Maher
“Because I am, just as you are you. We don’t always get to pick who we are, Shelly Wynn, but we can choose to celebrate it.”
Nathan Reese Maher, Lights Out: Book 2

“If someone says something about your art that makes you feel bad, disregard it and joyfully make more art.”
Gayle Wray

Nathan Reese Maher
“The shadow self is what lies beneath the makeup. It’s those ugly parts that you haven’t accepted about yourself. You hide those parts in the shadows until you’re ready.” Her face remained a haunting calm. “When you realize the scars are who you are, that there was nothing wrong with you and that you were beautiful all along - that’s when you decide to take the makeup off.”
Nathan Reese Maher, Lights Out: Book 2

Sarah Beth Durst
“Champion Ven knelt in the ruins of the village. Sifting through the rubble, he lifted out a broken doll, its pink dress streaked with dirt and its pottery face cracked.
There was always a broken doll.
Why did there always have to be a damn doll?”
Sarah Beth Durst, The Queen of Blood

“I like to party, and by "party" I mean "make dolls.”
Gayle Wray

“With joy in every task and whimsy in our hearts, we are the Dollmakers, it is WHO we are.”
Gayle Wray

Nathan Reese Maher
“Patches don’t look it, but when attached to your soul they can get pretty heavy. They go over the holes in your soul, like when you patch a sock. When you have a hole in your soul, it’s because you’re hurting from something. I don’t know if you noticed, but that girl had a lot of holes.”
Nathan Reese Maher, Lights Out: Book 2

Nathan Reese Maher
“There’s nothing wrong with you at all. Sometimes people say or do things that are mean because there's something the matter with them. With Lydia, it seems there’s always something wrong with her.”
Nathan Reese Maher, Lights Out: Book 2

Nathan Reese Maher
“Soon, all the children were chanting it. “No school! No school!”
Nathan Reese Maher, Lights Out: Book 2

Nathan Reese Maher
“Shelly shook her head and made sure she had plenty of space so that she wouldn’t hit anything. As many times before, she kept the hoop close to her waist and then twirled it with small, tight bursts of speed. As the hoop gathered in momentum it started to give off a hum that soon took on a light blue illumination far brighter than the streetlamps. It was so bright, that it lit up the entire backyard.”
Nathan Reese Maher, Lights Out: Book 2

Nathan Reese Maher
“I’m afraid they’re not coming.” Abby said fearfully. “Our parents, our teachers – everyone! They’ve disappeared. That’s it. Lights out, Shelly. We’re on our own.”
Nathan Reese Maher, Lights Out: Book 2

Nathan Reese Maher
“It’s no big deal. It’s kind of like a tattoo. It won’t hurt, not too much, just a few stitches and it’ll be all over. It’s really interesting how it’s done. You won’t believe where your soul hides. Go on, take a guess. Where do you think it is?”
Nathan Reese Maher, Lights Out: Book 2

Nathan Reese Maher
“Aloha Oukou. It looked like your soul was escaping so I put you in a tree.”
Nathan Reese Maher, Lights Out: Book 2

Nathan Reese Maher
“Somehow her hula hoop had cut into the driver’s side door like the vehicle was made of cheese.”
Nathan Reese Maher, Lights Out: Book 2

Nathan Reese Maher
“She could spin it between her legs, skip with it, twirl it around her neck and transfer it from one arm to the other. Shelly hooped because she enjoyed it; it calmed her whenever she would have an argument or a bad day at school, and it also allowed her to think. Today, she needed to hoop more than ever.”
Nathan Reese Maher, Lights Out: Book 2

Kristen Henderson
“And no matter what
closet we were thrown in,
up what river we were sold
for an embarrassment,
or worse, traded
for a bottle of gin--
we’d carry on in
playful stitches, friends
‘til the end…which came
sooner than wished.”
Kristen Henderson, Of My Maiden Smoking

“Honour looked so much like a child herself, confined to bed, a white nightgown, like one of those maudlin Victorian dolls. Her cheeks were red, like someone had painted them, but I knew it was from rubbing, wiping away her melancholy.”
Ruth Ahmed, When Ali Met Honour

Russell Kirk
“Some months later, the Van Tassel children invited classmates home to play with their new doll. This was in the dead of winter. When the guests arrived, they did indeed find the Van Tassel children sliding down hill with a new doll. But that new doll was a human baby, the youngest Van Tassel, dead and frozen stiff. The baby had died the previous week, and had been stored in the woodshed for burial when the frost was out of the ground; the other children had asked if diey might have Susan for a doll, and Mrs. Van Tassel had not demurred.”
Russell Kirk, Ancestral Shadows: An Anthology of Ghostly Tales
tags: dolls

“Failures are just the rest stops on your highway to Success.”
Gayle Wray

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