Great Britain Quotes

Quotes tagged as "great-britain" Showing 1-30 of 36
William Wilberforce
“You may choose to look the other way but you can never say again that you did not know.”
William Wilberforce

Mahatma Gandhi
“Among the many misdeeds of British rule in India, history will look upon the Act which deprived a whole nation of arms as the blackest.”
Mahatma Gandhi

Kevin   Cole
“So,” he throttled shift knob into fifth gear half a block from a stop sign, “you’re from Great Britain.”

“Yes. England. The North. Sheffield.”

“Why you guys drive on the left?”

“Obviously, because it’s right.”

“I’m being serious.”

“Are you?”

“I’m askin, aren’t I?”

“I don’t know. Tradition, I suppose.”

“That’s a dumb-ass reason.”

“Then perhaps you should start driving on the left.”
Kevin Cole

Todd McFarlane
“This is an odd one. You have one country in the world where a word has a deeper meaning, it can really mess with design plans. ...But we have a difficult situation here so I guess we'll be looking at putting different sound chips in the dolls heading there [Britain].”
Todd McFarlane

Karl Wiggins
“For the most part policy-makers are too nervous about offending people, yet when BRITAIN really was GREAT that was the last thought on our minds.”
Karl Wiggins, 100 Common Sense Policies to make BRITAIN GREAT again

Karl Wiggins
“Policies should also offer a solution. What a concept! Imagine that! A policy that sorted out all the shit in this country once and for all”
Karl Wiggins, 100 Common Sense Policies to make BRITAIN GREAT again

Winston S. Churchill
“Well, in war, you can only be killed once. But in politics, many times.”
Winston Churchill

Susanna Clarke
“Ha!" cried Dr John contemptuously. "Magic! That is chiefly used for killing Frenchmen, is it not?”
Susanna Clarke, Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell

Howard Zinn
“I was a Shoemaker, & got my living by my Labor. When this Rebellion come on, I saw some of my Neighbors got into Commission, who were no better than myself. I was very ambitious, & did not like to see those Men above me. I was asked to enlist as a private Soldier. . . I offered to enlist upon having a Lieutenants Commission; which was granted. I imagined my self now in a way of Promotion: if I was killed in Battle, there would be an end of me, but if my Captain was killed, I should rise in Rank, & should still have a Chance to rise higher. These Sir! were the only Motives of my entering into the Service; for as the Dispute between Great Britain & the colonies, I know nothing of it. . .”
Howard Zinn, A People's History of the United States

Mark Kurlansky
“Since the industrial revolution, Great Britain had been developing an ever-increasing market for groundfish - especially cod, haddock, and plaice - because fried fish, later fish-and-chips, became the favorite dish of the urban working class.”
Mark Kurlansky, Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World

Peter Hitchens
“The US constitution is like Washington DC, a matter of columns and beautiful design, the English constitution is more like a forest, you can't build a forest, you can easily cut it down, and that is what we're doing, we're cutting down a forest that we can't rebuild.”
Peter Hitchens, The Abolition of Britain: From Winston Churchill to Princess Diana

“Under the Slavery Abolition Act 1833 emancipating the enslaved in most of Britain’s colonies, the British state agreed to pay £20 million compensation to slave owners and other beneficiaries of slavery such as mortgagees and annuitants who had financial claims secured on the enslaved.”
Draper, Nicholas

Carlo M. Cipolla
“A questo punto, a costo di interrompere il filo del discorso, viene spontaneo un contro tra il destino dell’Inghilterra e quello dell’Italia. L’Inghilterra si ritrovò tra le mani ottima lana quando (nel Medioevo) la lana era la materia prima più ricercata; si ritrovò tra le mani ottimo ed abbondante carbone quando (ai tempi della Rivoluzione Industriale) la materia prima più preziosa era il carbone; e si ritrovò tra le mani il petrolio del mre del Nord quando (ai giorni nostri) il petrolio divenne la fonte di energia più usata nell’attività produttiva. In contrasto l’Italia ebbe poca e grama lana nel Medioevo, pochissimo e gramissimo carbone nella Rivoluzione Industriale, e pochissimo e gramissimo petrolio nell’epoca corrente: in compenso ebbe sempre abbondanza di marmo che usò soprattutto per adornare chiese ed erigere monumenti funerari nei cimiteri.”
Carlo M. Cipolla, Allegro ma non troppo. Con Le leggi fondamentali della stupidità umana

Hank Bracker
“Neville Chamberlain, the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, honestly believed that he could reason with Adolf Hitler in good faith. Now, most history books find little else to say about Chamberlain and he is solely remembered for believing that he could pacify Herr Führer by signing the Munich Agreement of 1938. In doing this, he ceded to Germany the Sudetenland, a German-speaking part of Czechoslovakia, without having any real authority to do so. Three days later, French Prime Minister Édouard Daladier followed suit, thereby giving the “German Reich” a piece of Czechoslovakia, consisting of the border districts of Bohemia, Moravia, and parts of Silesia. In March of 1939, German troops rolled in and occupied the territory. Three other parts broke off from Czechoslovakia, with one becoming the Slovak Republic, another part being annexed by Hungary, and the third part, which was borderland, becoming a part of Poland. These all came together to become satellite states and allies of Nazi Germany.
On May 10, 1940, in a radio address to the 8th Pan American Scientific Congress, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt declared, “I am a pacifist. You, my fellow citizens of twenty-one American Republics, are pacifists too.” Roosevelt was referring to Canada and Latin America. The United States attempted to remain neutral and did not enter into the war until four days after Pearl Harbor was attacked by Japan. Roosevelt opposed the concept of war and made every attempt to find a peaceful solution to the hostilities in Europe. On December 11, 1941, after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor, both Germany and Italy declared war on the United States.”
Captain Hank Bracker, "Seawater One...."

John Galsworthy
“Most of our caste in this country, if they only knew it, are Confucian rather than Christian. Belief in ancestors, and tradition, respect for parents, honesty, moderation of conduct, kind treatment of animals and dependents, absence of self-obtrusion, and stoicism in face of pain and death.”
John Galsworthy, Flowering Wilderness

“The church of England could never become the church of England's Empire. . . The sovereign and his heir [Charles II and James], by policy if not by conviction, were religious tolerationists even more in the empire than in England. In the colonies, the royal brothers were free from the predominance of the church, and they wielded overseas an authority far less fettered than it was in England. The duke and the king therefore ordered their viceroys to tolerate all religions privately practiced and peaceably conducted. Under the later Stuarts, "Greater Britain" became truly tolerant. Great Britain did not. (p193)”
Stephen Saunders Webb, 1676: The End of American Independence

Stewart Stafford
“In the vastness of the United States of America, the island nation Britain found the perfect vessel into which to pour its continental-sized hubris and ambition.”
Stewart Stafford

David McDowall
“Until modern times it was as easy to travel across water as it was across land, where roads were frequently unusable.”
David McDowall, An Illustrated History of Britain

Zita Steele
“He was made a prisoner in the Tower of London and stripped of his property. He remained imprisoned in the tower until 1646.”
Zita Steele, Makers of America: A Personal Family History

David McDowall
“After the First World War it was natural that some Europeans should try to create a European union that would prevent a repetition of war. A few British people welcomed the idea. But when France proposed such an arrangement in 1930, one British politician spoke for the majority of the nation: "Our hearts are not in Europe; we could never share the truly European point of view nor become real patriots of Europe. Besides, we could never give up our own patriotism for an Empire which extends to all parts of the world... The character of the British people makes it impossible for us to take part seriously in any Pan-European system.”
David McDowall, An Illustrated History of Britain

David McDowall
“After becoming a member in 1973, Britain's attitude towards the European Community continued to be unenthusiastic. Although trade with Europe greatly increased, most British continued to feel that they had not had any economic benefit from Europe. This feeling was strengthened by the way in which Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher argued for a better financial deal for Britain in the Community's affairs. The way in which she fought won her some admiration in Britain, but also anger in many parts of Europe. She welcomed closer co-operation in the European Community but only if this did not mean any lessening of sovereignty. Many Europeans saw this as a contradiction.”
David McDowall, An Illustrated History of Britain

Romain Gary
“In England,' I told her, ‘the whole thing would probably have been settled by a
letter to the Times, after which, under pressure from public opinion, Parliament would simply vote the necessary laws for the protection of the African fauna.”
Romain Gary, The Roots of Heaven

Romain Gary
“In England,' I told her, ‘the whole thing would probably have been settled by a letter to the Times, after which, under pressure from public opinion, Parliament would simply vote the necessary laws for the protection of the African fauna.”
Romain Gary, The Roots of Heaven

Andy Carrington
“I see you up there
sat
on that throne
with your one-million-pound
hat
and imported Indian
cloth
draped in animal
skins
and gold
getting slap-up breakfasts
- paid for you by the taxpayer -
served on silver
platters
by minimum-
wage
butlers

then preaching
to
US
about spending.”
Andy Carrington, Cameron Fucks Dead Pigs & I Got Called a Scrounger

Christopher Hitchens
“The empire on which the sun never set was also the empire on which the gore never dried.”
Christopher Hitchens, The Quotable Hitchens from Alcohol to Zionism: The Very Best of Christopher Hitchens

Thomas Newport
“I propose that an area of no more than 300 square miles, centered roughly upon Henley-on-Thames, has made this quintessentially British town Britain's 'small town and village murder capital'.”
Thomas Newport, BINOCLARITY: A travel along the length of the River Thames and into the heart of the British psyche

Abhijit Naskar
“You vilify Hitler yet glorify Buckingham Palace, when the atrocities of the palace far outweigh the atrocities of Hitler. If Adolf Hitler was a manifestation of the worst of human nature, so was, and still greatly is, Britain, that is, the monarchy and its loyal, spineless subjects.”
Abhijit Naskar, Heart Force One: Need No Gun to Defend Society

Abhijit Naskar
“If Britain ever had an actual government of merit and character, it would have severed all ties with the stone-age system of monarchy long time ago.”
Abhijit Naskar, Heart Force One: Need No Gun to Defend Society

Abhijit Naskar
“You vilify Hitler yet glorify Buckingham Palace, when the atrocities of the palace far outweigh the atrocities of Hitler.”
Abhijit Naskar, Heart Force One: Need No Gun to Defend Society

Leopold II
“India has never cost England one centime. it paid back What it cost. India provides a livelihood for all benjamins of English families.”
Leopold II

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