Eve Quotes

Quotes tagged as "eve" Showing 1-30 of 155
Kelley Armstrong
“You'll wrest a burning sword from an angel, but you're afraid of bats?"
"I'm not afraid of them. I just don't like them. They're...furry. Flying things shouldn't be furry. It's not right. And if I ever meet the Creator, I'm taking that one up with him."
"That I'd like to see. Your one and possible only chance to get the answer to every question in the universe, and you ask, 'Why are bats furry?'"
"I will. You just wait.”
Kelley Armstrong, Haunted

Anna Carey
“You can love anyone. Love is just caring about someone very deeply. Feeling like that
person matters to you, like your whole world would be sadder without them in it.”
Anna Carey, Eve
tags: eve, love

Alice Hoffman
“The sky is already purple; the first few stars have appeared, suddenly, as if someone had thrown a handful of silver across the edge of the world.”
Alice Hoffman, Here on Earth

Oscar Wilde
“Why can't these American women stay in their own country? They are always telling us that it is the paradise for women.

It is. That is the reason why, like Eve, they are so excessively anxious to get out of it.”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray and Other Writings

Walter M. Miller Jr.
“We are the centuries... We have your eoliths and your mesoliths and your neoliths. We have your Babylons and your Pompeiis, your Caesars and your chromium-plated (vital-ingredient impregnated) artifacts. We have your bloody hatchets and your Hiroshimas. We march in spite of Hell, we do – Atrophy, Entropy, and Proteus vulgaris, telling bawdy jokes about a farm girl name of Eve and a traveling salesman called Lucifer. We bury your dead and their reputations. We bury you. We are the centuries. Be born then, gasp wind, screech at the surgeon’s slap, seek manhood, taste a little godhood, feel pain, give birth, struggle a little while, succumb: (Dying, leave quietly by the rear exit, please.) Generation, regeneration, again, again, as in a ritual, with blood-stained vestments and nail-torn hands, children of Merlin, chasing a gleam. Children, too, of Eve, forever building Edens – and kicking them apart in berserk fury because somehow it isn’t the same. (AGH! AGH! AGH! – an idiot screams his mindless anguish amid the rubble. But quickly! let it be inundated by the choir, chanting Alleluias at ninety decibels.)”
Walter M. Miller Jr., A Canticle for Leibowitz

Debra Anastasia
“Don't tie your success to anything other than what's inside you”
Debra Anastasia, Poughkeepsie

Bulleh Shah
“Not a believer in the mosque am I,
Nor a disbeliever with his rites am I.
I am not the pure amongst the impure,
I am neither Moses nor Pharaoh.
Bulleh, I know not who I am.

Not in the holy books am I,
Nor do I dwell in bhang or wine,
Nor do I live in a drunken haze,
Nor in sleep or waking known.
Bulleh, I know not who I am.

Not in happiness or in sorrow am I found.
I am neither pure nor mired in filthy ground.
Not of water nor of land,
Nor am I in air or fire to be found.
Bulleh, I know not who I am.

Not an Arab nor Lahori,
Not a Hindi or Nagouri,
Nor a Muslim or Peshawari,
Not a Buddhist or a Christian.
Bulleh, I know not who I am.

Secrets of religion have I not unravelled,
I am not of Eve and Adam.
Neither still nor moving on,
I have not chosen my own name!
Bulleh, I know not who I am.

From first to last, I searched myself.
None other did I succeed in knowing.
Not some great thinker am I.
Who is standing in my shoes, alone?

Bulleh, I know not who I am.”
Bulleh Shah

Christine de Pizan
“As for those who state that it is thanks to a woman, the lady Eve, that man was expelled from paradise, my answer to them would be that man has gained far more through Mary than he ever lost through Eve.”
Christine de Pizan, The Book of the City of Ladies

Michael  Grant
“Its the fate of all creators: They fall in love with their creations.”
Michael Grant, Eve & Adam

Garth Stein
“She was my rain. She was my unpredictable element. She was my fear. But a racer should not be afraid of rain; a racer should embrace the rain.”
garth stein, The Art of Racing in the Rain

Debra Anastasia
“Beckett started the Hummer and texted Eve:
Tak4e Ur Cloth3s OFF Im on my qway
Her reply came back quick as lightning:
Take ur clothes off and f*ck yourself.
“One way or another, this chick is gonna kill me,” Beckett growled as the Hummer roared away.”
Debra Anastasia, Poughkeepsie

Anna Carey
“I let the wound fester and grow, feeding on the silence between us. I learned then a crucial truth: that a relationship between two people can be judged by the list of things unspoken between them.”
Anna Carey, Eve

“I like when you look at me like you can’t figure me out. You’re considering getting to know me, but you’re not sure I’m worth your time.”
Kate Angell, Strike Zone
tags: eve, sloan

Anna Carey
“I wished to no longer hear the grayed bones crunching underneath the brush or feel the now inexorable fear that seemed to work its way inside my rib cage, rocking me at my core.”
Anna Carey, Eve

Jonathan Safran Foer
“At the end of my dream, Eve put the apple back on the branch. The tree went back into the ground. It became a sapling, which became a seed.”
Jonathan Safran Foer

Charlotte Brontë
“Milton's Eve! Milton's Eve! ... Milton tried to see the first woman; but Cary, he saw her not ... I would beg to remind him that the first men of the earth were Titans, and that Eve was their mother: from her sprang Saturn, Hyperion, Oceanus; she bore Prometheus" --

"Pagan that you are! what does that signify?"

"I say, there were giants on the earth in those days: giants that strove to scale heaven. The first woman's breast that heaved with life on this world yielded the daring which could contend with Omnipotence: the stregth which could bear a thousand years of bondage, -- the vitality which could feed that vulture death through uncounted ages, -- the unexhausted life and uncorrupted excellence, sisters to immortality, which after millenniums of crimes, struggles, and woes, could conceive and bring forth a Messiah. The first woman was heaven-born: vast was the heart whence gushed the well-spring of the blood of nations; and grand the undegenerate head where rested the consort-crown of creation. ...
I saw -- I now see -- a woman-Titan: her robe of blue air spreads to the outskirts of the heath, where yonder flock is grazing; a veil white as an avalanche sweeps from hear head to her feet, and arabesques of lighting flame on its borders. Under her breast I see her zone, purple like that horizon: through its blush shines the star of evening. Her steady eyes I cannot picture; they are clear -- they are deep as lakes -- they are lifted and full of worship -- they tremble with the softness of love and the lustre of prayer. Her forehead has the expanse of a cloud, and is paler than the early moon, risen long before dark gathers: she reclines her bosom on the ridge of Stilbro' Moor; her mighty hands are joined beneath it. So kneeling, face to face she speaks with God. That Eve is Jehova's daughter, as Adam was His son.”
Charlotte Brontë, Shirley

Robert Rowland Smith
“Although her disobedience is tragic, Eve’s innocence is not all bad. Certainly, that innocfence leads her to make a poor choice - the very worst - but the fact that she makes a choice at all, the fact that she engages the Devil in a debate which could go either way, the fact that she acts without God breathing down her neck - all speak for her free will or, what amounts to the same thing, her margin for error. It is from this margin for error that freedom springs, because you can’t be free to right unless you can be free to be wrong.”
Robert Rowland Smith, Breakfast with Socrates: An Extraordinary (Philosophical) Journey Through Your Ordinary Day

J.D. Robb
“Peabody, are you wearing a cross?"

"What? Me?" Her cheeks went pink as she clear her throat. "It just happened that I know Mariella in Records, who just happened to have one, and I happened to borrow it. Just for backup."

"I see. And would you also be carrying a pointy stick?"

"Not unless you mean McNab."

Eve stopped at a light and turned around in her seat. "Repeat after me: Vampires do not exist."

"Vampires do not exist," Peabody recited.”
J.D. Robb, Eternity in Death

“Rat-a-tat-tat."
"Quack."
Kate Angell

J.D. Robb
“Would you be shedding tears for McNab’s dead body if he’d been screwing around on you?”

Peabody pursed her lips. “Well, since I’d’ve been the one who killed him, I’d probably be shedding tears for me because you’d be arresting me. And that would really make me sad.”
J.D. Robb, Strangers in Death

“As we reread Genesis 2...we immediately understand WHAT is 'crafty' about the serpent's question in Genesis 3. God did NOT in fact say in Genesis 2, 'You MUST NOT EAT from any tree in the garden' (3:1). What God did say was almost exactly the opposite: 'You ARE FREE TO EAT from any tree in the garden' (except the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, 2:16). The vocabulary of God in Genesis 2 indicates freedom and blessing. The vocabulary of the serpent in Genesis 3 indicates prohibition and restriction. The serpent's ploy is to suggest to the woman that God is really not so good after all. He shifts attention away from all that God in his generosity has provided for his creatures in creation and onto the one thing that God has for the moment explicitly withheld.”
Iain Provan, Seriously Dangerous Religion: What the Old Testament Really Says and Why It Matters

Casey L. Bond
“Good. Never fear the dark, Eve. Fear the things that hide within it.”
Casey L. Bond, High Seas

Casey L. Bond
“Isn’t that what love is? Giving your heart to someone, knowing only they have the power to make it bleed? Because no one else on the earth matters as much as them. Even with the knowledge that heartache is assured, our hearts are willing sacrifices.”
Casey L. Bond, High Seas

Casey L. Bond
“Unfortunately, I know that it’s entirely possible to hate what you love. It’s a tormenting feeling, like having two minds, or like your body is constantly being pulled apart by separate ropes.”
Casey L. Bond, High Seas

Casey L. Bond
“A person could rise above their past, but they couldn’t escape it. Some got trapped in the mire of what happened to them and could neither live in the present nor envision a future.”
Casey L. Bond, High Noon
tags: eve

Megan Campisi
“It's always women who eat sins, since it was Eve who first ate a sin: the Forbidden Fruit.”
Megan Campisi, Sin Eater

A.D. Aliwat
“Evil travels—like all energy, it transfers between people and objects; it moves, gets stored, moves again. But where did it originate? When Eve ate the apple? Or before that, with Satan, that fallen seraph who took the form of a snake and whispered with slithering tongue into her ear? Did she birth it or was it thrust upon us by some insufflating malefic serpent? Is it man-made or a supernatural force?”
A.D. Aliwat, In Limbo

A.D. Aliwat
“Eve wasn’t evil. Like a lot of women in history, she just gets a bad rap. She was just doing what she was supposed to do during all that lapsarian business. And we’re all the better for it. Without Eve, there would have been no sin, and thus no need for Jesus. Without Jesus, God would be incomplete. And we wouldn’t know that He is really just a synonym for love.”
A.D. Aliwat, In Limbo

Leonora Carrington
“Strange how the bible always seems to end up in misery and cataclysm. I often wondered how their angry and vicious God became so popular. Humanity is very strange and I don’t pretend to understand anything, however why worship something that only sends you plagues and massacres? and why was Eve blamed for everything?”
Leonora Carrington, The Hearing Trumpet

John Milton
“Forth reaching to the fruit, she plucked, she ate:
Earth felt the wound, and Nature from her seat
Sighing through all her works gave signs of woe,
That all was lost.”
John Milton, Paradise Lost

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