Corn Quotes

Quotes tagged as "corn" Showing 1-30 of 33
Michael Pollan
“But carbon 13 [the carbon from corn] doesn't lie, and researchers who have compared the isotopes in the flesh or hair of Americans to those in the same tissues of Mexicans report that it is now we in the North who are the true people of corn.... Compared to us, Mexicans today consume a far more varied carbon diet: the animals they eat still eat grass (until recently, Mexicans regarded feeding corn to livestock as a sacrilege); much of their protein comes from legumes; and they still sweeten their beverages with cane sugar.
So that's us: processed corn, walking.”
Michael Pollan, The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals

Michael Pollan
“So this is what commodity corn can do to a cow: industrialize the miracle of nature that is a ruminant, taking this sunlight- and prairie grass-powered organism and turning it into the last thing we need: another fossil fuel machine. This one, however, is able to suffer. ”
Michael Pollan, The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals

Michael Pollan
“Originally, the atoms of carbon from which we’re made were floating in the air, part of a carbon dioxide molecule. The only way to recruit these carbon atoms for the molecules necessary to support life—the carbohydrates, amino acids, proteins, and lipids—is by means of photosynthesis. Using sunlight as a catalyst the green cells of plants combine carbon atoms taken from the air with water and elements drawn from the soil to form the simple organic compounds that stand at the base of every food chain. It is more than a figure of speech to say that plants create life out of thin air.”
Michael Pollan, The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals

Michael Pollan
“Corn is what feeds the steer that becomes the steak. Corn feeds the chicken and the pig, the turkey, and the lamb, the catfish and the tilapia and, increasingly, even the salmon, a carnivore by nature that the fish farmers are reengineering to tolerate corn. The eggs are made of corn. The milk and cheese and yogurt, which once came from dairy cows that grazed on grass, now typically comes from Holsteins that spend their working lives indoors tethered to machines, eating corn.

Head over to the processed foods and you find ever more intricate manifestations of corn. A chicken nugget, for example, piles up corn upon corn: what chicken it contains consists of corn, of course, but so do most of a nugget's other constituents, including the modified corn starch that glues the things together, the corn flour in the batter that coats it, and the corn oil in which it gets fried. Much less obviously, the leavenings and lecithin, the mono-, di-, and triglycerides, the attractive gold coloring, and even the citric acid that keeps the nugget "fresh" can all be derived from corn.

To wash down your chicken nuggets with virtually any soft drink in the supermarket is to have some corn with your corn. Since the 1980s virtually all the sodas and most of the fruit drinks sold in the supermarket have been sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) -- after water, corn sweetener is their principal ingredient. Grab a beer for you beverage instead and you'd still be drinking corn, in the form of alcohol fermented from glucose refined from corn. Read the ingredients on the label of any processed food and, provided you know the chemical names it travels under, corn is what you will find. For modified or unmodified starch, for glucose syrup and maltodextrin, for crystalline fructose and ascorbic acid, for lecithin and dextrose, lactic acid and lysine, for maltose and HFCS, for MSG and polyols, for the caramel color and xanthan gum, read: corn. Corn is in the coffee whitener and Cheez Whiz, the frozen yogurt and TV dinner, the canned fruit and ketchup and candies, the soups and snacks and cake mixes, the frosting and candies, the soups and snacks and cake mixes, the frosting and gravy and frozen waffles, the syrups and hot sauces, the mayonnaise and mustard, the hot dogs and the bologna, the margarine and shortening, the salad dressings and the relishes and even the vitamins. (Yes, it's in the Twinkie, too.)

There are some forty-five thousand items in the average American supermarket and more than a quarter of them now contain corn. This goes for the nonfood items as well: Everything from the toothpaste and cosmetics to the disposable diapers, trash bags, cleansers, charcoal briquettes, matches, and batteries, right down to the shine on the cover of the magazine that catches your eye by the checkout: corn. Even in Produce on a day when there's ostensibly no corn for sale, you'll nevertheless find plenty of corn: in the vegetable wax that gives the cucumbers their sheen, in the pesticide responsible for the produce's perfection, even in the coating on the cardboard it was shipped in. Indeed, the supermarket itself -- the wallboard and joint compound, the linoleum and fiberglass and adhesives out of which the building itself has been built -- is in no small measure a manifestation of corn.”
Michael Pollan, The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals

Edmund S. Morgan
“The Indians, keeping to themselves, laughed at your superior methods and lived from the land more abundantly and with less labor than you did... And when your own people started deserting in order to live with them, it was too much... So you killed the Indians, tortured them, burned their villages, burned their cornfields... But you still did not grow much corn.”
edmund morgan

“Finn fell asleep draped in Kittens and dreamed that the corn walked the earth on skinny white roots, liked to joke with the crows, and wasn't afraid of anything.”
Laura Ruby, Bone Gap

Michael Pollan
“Planted, a single corn seed yielded more than 150 fat kernels, often as many as 300, while the return on a seed of wheat was something less than 50:1”
Michael Pollan, The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals
tags: corn, food

John Darnielle
“The wind comes across the plains not howling but singing. It's the difference between this wind and its big-city cousins: the full-throated wind of the plains has leeway to seek out the hidden registers of its voice. Where immigrant farmers planted windbreaks a hundred and fifty years ago. it keens in protest; where the young corn shoots up, it whispers as it passes, crossing field after field in its own time, following eastward trends but in no hurry to find open water. You can't usually see it in paintings, but it's an important part of the scenery.”
John Darnielle, Universal Harvester

Richard Puz
“We got a saying around here about our corn, ‘it grows knee-high by the Fourth of July.”
Richard Puz, The Carolinian

“If you were food, you would be corn. I dont know why, i just sense corn in you.”
Lizbeth Mori

Josh Stern
“Blood is thicker than water, but they still use corn starch as a thickener on cooking shows”
Josh Stern, And That's Why I'm Single: What Good Is Having A Lucky Horseshoe Up Your Butt When The Horse Is Still Attached?

William Kamkwamba
“With the money my mother earned from selling cakes, my father cut a deal with Mangochi and bought one pail of maize. My mother took it to the mill, saved half the flour for us, and used the rest for more cakes. We did this every day, taking enough to eat and selling the rest. It was enough to provide our one blob of nsima each night, along with some pumpkin leaves. It was practically nothing, yet knowing it would be there somehow made the hunger less painful.

"As long as we can stay in business," my father said, "we'll make it through. Our profit is that we live.”
William Kamkwamba, The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind: Creating Currents of Electricity and Hope

William Kamkwamba
“Maize is just another word for white corn, and by the end of this story, you won't believe how much you know about corn.”
William Kamkwamba, The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind: Creating Currents of Electricity and Hope

Michael Pollan
“Farmers facing lower prices have only one option if they want to be able to maintain their standard of living, pay their bills, and service their debt, and that is to produce more [corn]”
Michael Pollan, The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals

Michael Pollan
“The free market has never worked in agriculture and it never will. The economics of a family farm are very different from a firm's... the demand for food isn't elastic; people don't eat more just because food is cheap. Even if I go out of business this land will keep producing corn.”
Michael Pollan, The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals

Emily R. Austin
“I asked a nurse for dental floss and was told that I am not allowed dental floss. Apparently dental floss can be used for several functions besides the maintenance of healthy gums. These apparently include self-harm. When instructed that I was not permitted dental floss because of “risks it raises associated with suicide” I envisioned a noose made entirely of floss. Realizing such a noose would require a dramatic amount of floss to effectively uphold any human person, I brought it to the attention of a nurse.

“I don’t believe that even the most practiced engineers could fashion any functioning noose out of a single container of floss,” I say.

“People use it to cut themselves,” she explained.

“Oh,” I replied.

I had just about come to terms with the no-floss rule until the hospital, in a flagrant display of disrespect for its patients, chose to serve us corn on the cob for lunch.

“Are you aware that we are not allowed dental floss?” I yelled at the nurse bringing me the corn. I then threw the corn violently from my plate into the nearest wall.”
Emily Austin, Oh Honey

Steven Magee
“I am an expert on the language of crop circles.”
Steven Magee

Michael Pollan
“For an American like me, growing up linked to a very different food chain, yet one that is also rooted in a field of corn, not to think of himself as a corn person suggests either a failure of imagination or a triumph of capitalism.”
Michael Pollan, The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals

“Corn can add inches in a single day; if you listened, you could hear it grow.”
Laura Ruby

“Michelle made a point of being friendly, not just seeming friendly, and rich girls would meet her eyes with something like humanity, surprised at themselves for how pleasantly they were treating a plebe.”
Nick LaRocca

“I was having one of those experiences where you're in a place, whether it's a job interview for a position you don't want with a company you don't even trust or a class you don't want to take, and you're sitting there wondering, What am I doing here? Like a part of you has split off from yourself and occasionally drops in and asks, Can we leave now?”
Nick LaRocca

“When I think of the person I was, I don't know how anyone ever forgave me: my parents, all the people who were the age I now am. I suppose it's that they thought of me the way I sometimes think of young people now: It's okay, because they'll change, because they'll have to.”
Nick LaRocca

Michael Pollan
“The great edifice of variety and choice that is an American supermarket turns out to rest on a remarkably narrow biological foundation comprised of a tiny group of plants that is dominated by a single species: Zea mays, a giant tropical grass most Americans know as corn...
Read the ingredients on the label of any processed food and, provided you know the chemical name it travels under, corn is what you will find. For modified or unmodified starch, for glucose syrup and maltodextrin, for crystalline fructose and ascorbic acid, for lecithin and dextrose, lactic acid and lysine, for maltose and HFCS, for MSG and polyols, for the caramel color and xanthan gum, read: corn... There are some forty-five thousand items in the average American supermarket and more than a quarter of them now contain corn. This goes for the nonfood items as well...
And us?”
Michael Pollan, The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals

Michael Pollan
“Wet milling (to produce starch) is an energy-intensive way to make food; for every calorie of processed food it produces, another ten calories of fossil fuel energy are burned.”
Michael Pollan, The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals
tags: corn, food, hfcs

Michael Pollan
“Today it [high fructose corn syrup] is the most valuable food product refined from corn, accounting for 530 million bushels every year. (A bushel of corn yields 33 pounds of fructose)”
Michael Pollan, The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals
tags: corn, food, hfcs

Michael Pollan
“Try as we might, each of us can eat only about 1500 pounds of food a year. What this means for the food industry is that its natural rate of growth is somewhere around 1% every year (growth of American population).”
Michael Pollan, The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals
tags: corn, food, hfcs

William Maxwell
“At that period, rising in the world meant giving up working with your hands in favor of work in a store or an office. The people who lived in town had made it, and turned their backs socially on those who had not but were still growing corn and wheat out there in the country. What seemed like an impassable gulf was only the prejudice of a single generation, which refused to remember its own not very remote past.”
William Maxwell, Ancestors: A Family History

Michael Pollan
“One would expect to find a comparatively high proportion of carbon 13 [the carbon from corn] in the flesh of people whose staple food of choice is corn - Mexicans, most famously. Americans eat much more wheat than corn - 114 pounds of wheat flour per person per year, compared to 11 pounds of corn flour. The Europeans who colonized America regarded themselves as wheat people, in contrast to the native corn people they encountered; wheat in the West has always been considered the most refined, or civilized, grain. If asked to choose, most of us would probably still consider ourselves wheat people, though by now the whole idea of identifying with a plant at all strikes us as a little old-fashioned. Beef people sounds more like it, though nowadays chicken people, which sounds not nearly so good, is probably closer to the truth of the matter. But carbon 13 doesn't lie, and researchers who compared the carbon isotopes in the flesh or hair of Americans to those in the same tissues of Mexicans report that it is now we in the North who are the true people of corn. 'When you look at the isotope ratios,' Todd Dawson, a Berkeley biologist who's done this sort of research, told me, 'we North Americans look like corn chips with legs.' Compared to us, Mexicans today consume a far more varied carbon diet: the animals they eat still eat grass (until recently, Mexicans regarded feeding corn to livestock as a sacrilege); much of their protein comes from legumes; and they still sweeten their beverages with cane sugar.
So that's us: processed corn, walking.”
Michael Pollan, The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals
tags: corn

“The Corn
boiled or roasted is still a Corn.
one went through the hot waters the other through the Fire.
Still The blessed Word.”
Mary Tornyenyor
tags: corn, word

Michael Anthony
“The first ear of corn, eaten like a typewriter, means summer to me—intense, but fleeting.”
Michael Anthony, V is for Vegetables: Inspired Recipes & Techniques for Home Cooks - from Artichokes to Zucchini

« previous 1