Personhood Quotes

Quotes tagged as "personhood" Showing 1-30 of 67
Djuna Barnes
“A man is whole only when he takes into account his shadow.”
Djuna Barnes

Orson Scott Card
“Because never in my entire childhood did I feel like a child. I felt like a person all along―the same person that I am today.”
Orson Scott Card, Ender's Game

Hermann Hesse
“He lost his Self a thousand times and for days on end he dwelt in non-being. But although the paths took him away from Self, in the end they always led back to it. Although Siddhartha fled from the Self a thousand times, dwelt in nothing, dwelt in animal and stone, the return was inevitable; the hour was inevitable when he would again find himself in sunshine or in moonlight, in shadow or in rain, and was again Self and Siddhartha, again felt the torment of the onerous life cycle.”
Herman Hesse, Siddhartha: An Indian Tale

Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
“Night, the beloved. Night, when words fade and things come alive. When the destructive analysis of day is done, and all that is truly important becomes whole and sound again. When man reassembles his fragmentary self and grows with the calm of a tree.”
Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

Orson Scott Card
“Because never in my entire childhood did I feel like a child. I felt like a person all along--the same person that I am today. I never felt that I spoke childishly. I never felt that my emotions and desires were somehow less real than adult emotions and desires. And in writing _Ender's Game_, I forced the audience to experience the lives of these children from that perspective--the perspective in which their feelings and decisions are just as real and important as any adult's. ... _Ender's Game_ asserts the personhood of children, and those who are used to thinking of children in another way ... are going to find _Ender's Game_ a very unpleasant place to live.”
Orson Scott Card, Ender's Game

Philip Roth
“what was astonishing to him was how people seemed to run out of their own being, run out of whatever the stuff was that made them who they were and, drained of themselves, turn into the sort of people they would once have felt sorry for. it was as though while their lives were rich and full they were secretly sick of themselves and couldn’t wait to dispose of their sanity and their health and all sense of proportion so as to get down to that other self, the true self, who was a wholly deluded fuckup.”
Philip Roth, American Pastoral

Jaron Lanier
“But the Turing test cuts both ways. You can't tell if a machine has gotten smarter or if you've just lowered your own standards of intelligence to such a degree that the machine seems smart. If you can have a conversation with a simulated person presented by an AI program, can you tell how far you've let your sense of personhood degrade in order to make the illusion work for you?

People degrade themselves in order to make machines seem smart all the time. Before the crash, bankers believed in supposedly intelligent algorithms that could calculate credit risks before making bad loans. We ask teachers to teach to standardized tests so a student will look good to an algorithm. We have repeatedly demonstrated our species' bottomless ability to lower our standards to make information technology look good. Every instance of intelligence in a machine is ambiguous.

The same ambiguity that motivated dubious academic AI projects in the past has been repackaged as mass culture today. Did that search engine really know what you want, or are you playing along, lowering your standards to make it seem clever? While it's to be expected that the human perspective will be changed by encounters with profound new technologies, the exercise of treating machine intelligence as real requires people to reduce their mooring to reality.”
Jaron Lanier, You Are Not a Gadget

Gary L. Francione
“We cannot justify treating any sentient nonhuman as our property, as a resource, as a thing that we an use and kill for our purposes.”
GaryLFrancione

Peter Singer
“We think of dogs as being more like people than pigs; but pigs are highly intelligent animals and if we kept pigs as pets and reared dogs for food, we would probably reverse our order of preference. Are we turning persons into bacon?”
Peter Singer, Practical Ethics

Dorothy Allison
“Class, race, sexuality, gender and all other categories by which we categorize and dismiss each other need to be excavated from the inside.”
Dorothy Allison

Jaron Lanier
“There are at least two ways to believe in the idea of quality. You can believe there's something ineffable going on within the human mind, or you can believe we just don't understand what quality in a mind is yet, even though we might someday. Either of those opinions allows one to distinguish quantity and quality. In order to confuse quantity and quality, you have to reject both possibilities. The mere possibility of there being something ineffable about personhood is what drives many technologists to reject the notion of quality. They want to live in an airtight reality that resembles an idealized computer program, in which everything is understood and there are no fundamental mysteries. They recoil from even the hint of a potential zone of mystery or an unresolved seam in one's worldview. This desire for absolute order usually leads to tears in human affairs, so there is a historical reason to distrust it. Materialist extremists have long seemed determined to win a race with religious fanatics: Who can do the most damage to the most people?”
Jaron Lanier, You Are Not a Gadget

Jaron Lanier
“The attribution of intelligence to machines, crowds of fragments, or other nerd deities obscures more than it illuminates. When people are told that a computer is intelligent, they become prone to changing themselves in order to make the computer appear to work better, instead of demanding that the computer be changed to become more useful.”
Jaron Lanier, You Are Not a Gadget

Gary L. Francione
“One of the main arguments that I make is that although almost everyone accepts that it is morally wrong to inflict “unnecessary” suffering and death on animals, 99% of the suffering and death that we inflict on animals can be justified only by our pleasure, amusement, or convenience. For example, the best justification that we have for killing the billions of nonhumans that we eat every year is that we enjoy the taste of animal flesh and animal products. This is not an acceptable justification if we take seriously, as we purport to, that it is wrong to inflict unnecessary suffering or death on animals, and it illustrates the confused thinking that I characterize as our “moral schizophrenia” when it comes to nonhumans.

A follow-up question that I often get is: “What about vivisection? Surely that use of animals is not merely for our pleasure, is it?”

Vivisection, Part One: The “Necessity” of Vivisection | Animal Rights: The Abolitionist Approach”
GaryLFrancione

Philippa Gregory
“My mother? My own mother told my lady governess that if the baby and I were in danger then they should save the baby.”
Philippa Gregory, The Red Queen

Christian Smith
“Human social life, I suggest, is the magma that erupts and builds up, so to speak, at the fault lines where natural human capacities meet and grind against and over natural human limitations…. This meeting of powers and limitations produces a creative, dynamic tension and energy that generates and fuels the making of human social life and social structures…. It is real human persons living through the tensions of natural existential contradictions who construct patterned social meanings, interactions, institutions, and structures.”
Christian Smith, What Is a Person?: Rethinking Humanity, Social Life, and the Moral Good from the Person Up

Philippa Gregory
“Be a wife of whom he can make no complaint, Margaret. That is the best advice I can give to you. You will be his wife; that is to be his servant, his possession. He will be your master. You had better please him.”
Philippa Gregory, The Red Queen

Philippa Gregory
“Poor little girl. Poor little girl," Nan says, and at first I think she is speaking of the baby, perhaps it is a girl after all. But then I realize she is speaking of me, a girl of thirteen years, whose own mother has said that they can let her die as long as a son and heir is born.”
Philippa Gregory, The Red Queen

Philippa Gregory
“The baby should always be saved in preference to the mother. That is the advice of the Holy Church, you know that. I was only reminding women of their duty. There is no need to make everything so personal, Margaret. You make everything into your own tragedy.”
Philippa Gregory, The Red Queen

Philippa Gregory
“Mother, before God," I say, my voice shaking with tears, "I swear that I have to believe that there is more for me in life than being wife to one man after another, and hoping not to die in childbirth!”
Philippa Gregory, The Red Queen

“It is recorded in the monastic rules that a monk once performed an abortion on a girl; the Buddha judged his action seriously wrong, which incurred him the highest offense in the monastic rule. A monk committing this kind of wrongful deed must be expelled from the monastic community. The Buddha considered the embryo to be a person like an adult, so the monk who killed the embryo through abortion was judged by Buddhist monastic rules as having committed a crime equal in gravity to killing an adult. In the commentary on the rule stated above, it is stated clearly that killing a human being means destroying human life from the first moment of fertilization to human life outside the womb. So, even though the Buddha himself did not give a clear-cut pronouncement about when personhood occurs, the Buddhist tradition, especially the Theravada tradition, clearly states that personhood starts when the process of fertilization takes place.”
Soraj Hongladarom, Genomics and Bioethics: Interdisciplinary Perspectives, Technologies and Advancements

Dilman Dila
“You’re not a human in a dog’s body,” Granny finally said, still watching the ice as it floated towards the ceiling.
“I am,” Red_Bati said.
“Humans have spirits,” Granny said. “You don’t.”
“I do,” Red_Bati said.
“You can’t,” Granny said.
“Why not? I’m aware of myself.”
Dilman Dila, Dominion: An Anthology of Speculative Fiction from Africa and the African Diaspora

“To respond to the call of the other is to be a full and active human being.”
David Murphy, Relational Depth: New Perspectives and Developments

Karl Kristian Flores
“We are human because there is more than one of us.
A man itself is like pigment without the "hue.”
Karl Kristian Flores, Can I Tell You Something?

Alex M. Vikoulov
“As biological beings, we humans - anchored to our biology - can only experience a thermodynamic arrow of time in one direction but given our rapid technological advances and the forthcoming Cybernetic Singularity, that might change for good. The ultimate effects of future developments may appear quite strange to us, present-day humans, as the emergence of things like personalized 'non-linear' reality and fluid distributed identity could challenge our current biological and cultural assumptions. The resulting 'identity' architectures will transform our notion of personhood and form the kernel of posthuman civilization.”
Alex M. Vikoulov, The Physics of Time: D-Theory of Time & Temporal Mechanics

“Dialogue is the non-indifference of the I towards the Thou ... dialogue is a primary, underlying condition of being human, of being a person, as is love.”
Peter F. Schmid, Relational Depth: New Perspectives and Developments

Craig D. Lounsbrough
“God allows us to believe that we do not have a soul, because it is in living in the emptiness that we are ‘not’ that we become convinced of the fullness that we ‘are.”
Craig D. Lounsbrough

Karl Kristian Flores
“The wide-eyed professor lectured, on the verge of tears, and when class ended, the students closed their notebooks shut and asked of her plans for the weekend, which was answered politely, but with a tinge of sadness, for the professor feared her personhood, which had in her lesson plan existed truly only minutes ago, was already being reduced to the small, meaningless matters of tomorrow.”
Karl Kristian Flores, The Goodbye Song

Karl Kristian Flores
“Pretty faces have distracted incoming hands ready to stab. Sex has disguised arguments. Politeness has prevented confrontation. Laughing has slowed down revelation. Emotions have been misinterpreted as agreements. Judgment has hampered our listening. Perhaps, for now, we are more accurately defined by what we say or think and not how we seem or look.”
Karl Kristian Flores, The Goodbye Song

Karl Kristian Flores
“Society: Beware of missing persons.”
Karl Kristian Flores, The Goodbye Song

Claudia Rankine
“To your mind, feelings are what create a person, something unwilling, something wild vandalizing whatever the skull holds. Those sensations form a someone. The headaches begin then.”
Claudia Rankine, Citizen: An American Lyric

« previous 1 3