Boarding School Quotes

Quotes tagged as "boarding-school" (showing 1-30 of 30)
Boris Johnson
“In the words of Mr Thierry Coup of Warner Bros: 'We are taking the most iconic and powerful moments of the stories and putting them in an immersive environment. It is taking the theme park experience to a new level.' And of course I wish Thierry and his colleagues every possible luck, and I am sure it will be wonderful. But I cannot conceal my feelings; and the more I think of those millions of beaming kids waving their wands and scampering the Styrofoam turrets of Hogwartse_STmk, and the more I think of those millions of poor put-upon parents who must now pay to fly to Orlando and pay to buy wizard hats and wizard cloaks and wizard burgers washed down with wizard meade_STmk, the more I grind my teeth in jealous irritation.

Because the fact is that Harry Potter is not American. He is British. Where is Diagon Alley, where they buy wands and stuff? It is in London, and if you want to get into the Ministry of Magic you disappear down a London telephone box. The train for Hogwarts goes from King's Cross, not Grand Central Station, and what is Harry Potter all about? It is about the ritual and intrigue and dorm-feast excitement of a British boarding school of a kind that you just don't find in America. Hogwarts is a place where children occasionally get cross with each other—not 'mad'—and where the situation is usually saved by a good old British sense of HUMOUR. WITH A U. RIGHT? NOT HUMOR. GOTTIT?”
Boris Johnson

Arthur Conan Doyle
“Man, or at least criminal man, has lost all enterprise and originality. As to my own little practice, it seems to be degenerating into an agency for recovering lost lead pencils and giving advice to young ladies from boarding-schools.”
Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Novels and Stories, Volume I

Tyne O'Connell
“Not only was Miss Cribbe bearded, and always trying to get chummy with us like we we're her real children or something, but she had a disgusting incontinent springer spaniel called Misty, who was constantly sneaking in to the dorms and weeing on our duvets”
Tyne O'Connell, Pulling Princes

Charlotte Munro
“You can wait as long as you like, pretty one, it won't make any difference. He will never see you as anything more than some victim he has to protect. Why he thinks it his duty to protect you from the inevitable, I do not know... unless he knows something we do not...”
Charlotte Munro, The Lockharts

Charlotte Munro
“I sunk to my knees in the spot he had left me. I felt a part of me had just been lost. I was fraught with so many emotions, confused by them all; however, I was hurt more than anything. Hurt to hear him call himself a monster. A monster? Of all the things I thought he was, a monster was not one of them.”
Charlotte Munro, The Lockharts

Shana Abe
“Is that why you came?'
'No, I came because I simply can't get enough of people looking down their noses at me. The girls at school are getting frightfully lax about it.'
'Are they? How remiss of them. We're taught from the cradle how to look down our noses, you know, we rich sons of bitches. Perhaps Westcliffe's curriculum is a tad too liberal these days.”
Shana Abe, The Sweetest Dark

Violet Haberdasher
“Knightley Academy stood out against the moonlight in silhouette, a ramshackle collection of chimneys, turrets and gables. Both boys stopped to take in the sight of the manicured lawns and tangled woods, the soaring chapel and the ivy-covered brick of the headmaster's house. They were home. For this, Henry felt, was home. Not some foreign castle encircled by guard towers, but this cozy, bizarre assortment of buildings with its gossiping kitchen maids and eccentric professors and clever students.”
Violet Haberdasher, The Secret Prince

Charlotte Munro
“By the sound of things, you know nothing about mathematics.'
'You can put it like that. I'm utterly useless.'
'Useless is such a harsh word, you are merely... inexperienced. So I thought we could start at the beginning.'
'I'm not that stupid. I know how to add, subtract and multiply-'
'I don't mean that kind of beginning...”
Charlotte Munro, The Lockharts

Emma Cline
“Someone's boyfriend died in a rock-climbing accident in Switzerland: everyone gathered around her, on fire with tragedy. Their dramatic shows up support underpinned with jealousy- bad luck was rare enough to be glamorous.”
Emma Cline, The Girls

Adriana Trigiani
“... but that's the beauty of boarding school. I make all my own decisions, small and medium, while the big ones are left up to the Prefect Academy - and as far as boys go, to the only expert I know - Suzanne Santry”
Adriana Trigiani, Viola in Reel Life

Charlotte Munro
“Ah, such a good pretty one.' There was a pause, 'You even got yourself dressed up.”
Charlotte Munro, The Lockharts

Tyne O'Connell
“Darling, I'm so unutterably bored as to be a hazard”
Tyne O'Connell, Pulling Princes

Jon Doust
“From the opening sentence, it is clear that we are in the presence of a writer with a distinctive voice and uncanny ability to capture the bewilderment and burgeoning anger of a boy struggling to remain true to himself while navigating the hypocritical system he finds himself trapped in … what makes Boy on a Wire much more than a bleak coming-of-age story is Doust’s sharp wit. “Justice not only prevails at Grammar School, it is rampant.” If you know an angry teenager, give this to him.’ — The Age”
Jon Doust, Boy on a Wire

“Unhappiness in a child accumulates because he sees no end to the dark tunnel. The thirteen weeks of a term might just as well be thirteen years.”
Graeme Greene

Jon Doust
“The novel is apparently autobiographical and is being publicised as such but Doust has done with his material what so many autobiographical novelists fail to do: he has turned it into a shapely story, with no extraneous material or diversions and with an absolutely consistent and convincing narrative voice.’ — Sydney Morning Herald”
Jon Doust, Boy on a Wire

Jon Doust
“The boarding school memoir or novel is an enduring literary subgenre, from 1950s classics such as The Catcher in the Rye to Curtis Sittenfeld’s Prep. Doust’s recognisably Australian contribution to the genre draws on his own experiences in a West Australian boarding school in this clever, polished, detail-rich debut novel. From the opening pages, the reader is wholly transported into the head of Jack Muir, a sensitive, sharp-eyed boy from small-town WA who is constantly measured (unfavourably) against his goldenboy brother. The distinctive, masterfully inhabited adolescent narrator recalls the narrator in darkly funny coming-of-age memoir Hoi Polloi (Craig Sherborne)—as does the juxtaposition of stark naivety and carefully mined knowingness.’ — Bookseller+Publisher”
Jon Doust, Boy on a Wire

Helen Laycock
“As their eyes became accustomed to the light, the girls were startled to see the figure in front of them. Hunched over, wearing a dark cloak, was an old man. His long, white hair straggled over his shoulders, his skin was covered with grey whiskers and one of his eyes, hooded, drooped below the other bulging one. His mouth hung open and his yellowed teeth did nothing to stop his rank breath pervading the air.”
Helen Laycock, Mandrake's Plot

Alleece Balts
“She may not be the prettiest, or the smartest, or the wealthiest at the Academy, but she could be kind. Anyone could be kind.”
Alleece Balts, The Crowd

M.J. Colewood
“History is all around us and you, my lucky few, are living in some of it..”
M.J. Colewood, The Last Treasure of Ancient England

Jon Doust
“…a hilarious, angry and sympathetic portrait of boys behaving badly, teeming with sadistic bullies, imperfect heroes, adolescent onanists and ice-cream gorging hedonists.’— The West Australian”
Jon Doust, Boy on a Wire

Lorene Cary
“How come you got to start making the bed the minute your feet hit the floor? You need to lighten up, girl. Live a little!' Then she'd laugh, delighted with herself and at my inability to be angry with her.”
Lorene Cary, Black Ice

M.J. Colewood
“A horse! A horse! My Dukedom for a horse!" (Duke William at Hastings - The Last Treasure of Ancient England)”
M.J. Colewood, The Last Treasure of Ancient England

Alexander McCall Smith
“…one of those dreadful boarding schools. It was down on the South Coast. I think some very unpleasant things happened there…. So many lives were distorted by such cruelty. I know so many men who had to put up with that, so many….”
Alexander McCall Smith, The Novel Habits of Happiness

Alice Hoffman
“As for Gus, he had come to Haddan with no appreciation for the human race and no expectations of his fellow man. He was full ready to confront contempt; he'd been beleaguered and insulted often enough to have learned to ignore anything with a heartbeat. Still, every once in a while he made an exception, as he did with Carlin Leander. He appreciated everything about Carlin and lived for the hour when they left their books and sneaked off to the graveyard. Not even the crow nesting in the elm tree could dissuade him from his mission, for when he was beside Carlin, Gus acquired a strange optimism; in the light of her radiance the rest of the world began to shine. For a brief time, bad faith and human weakness could be forgotten or, at the very least, temporarily ignored. When it came time to go back to their rooms, Gus followed on the path, holding on to each moment, trying his best to stretch out time. Standing in the shadows of the rose arbor in order to watch Carlin climb back up the fire escape at St. Anne's, his heart ached. He could tell he was going to be devastated, and yet he was already powerless. Carlin always turned and waved before she stepped through her window and Gus Pierce always waved back, like a common fool, an idiot of a boy who would have done anything to please her.”
Alice Hoffman, The River King

Enock Maregesi
“Mfundishe mtoto wako maadili mema kwa miaka kumi na tatu, katika umri wa miaka kumi na tatu fikra za mtoto huanza kuwa na maono na utambuzi wa vitu mbalimbali na watoto katika umri huo wanao uwezo wa kuchambua dhana kadha wa kadha za kinadharia na hali kadhalika wanao uwezo wa kuchambua nadharia tata zisizokuwa na hakika na hata zile zenye hakika zisizokuwa tata, kabla hujamkabidhi kwa dunia. Ukimkabidhi mtoto wako kwa dunia kabla ya umri wa miaka kumi na tatu, kama vile kumpeleka katika shule ya bweni au kumpeleka akalelewe na watu wengine ambao si wazazi wake, yale ambayo hukumfundisha atafundishwa na ulimwengu. Mpeleke mtoto wako katika shule ya bweni au kuishi na watu wengine akiwa amefundishwa maadili mema. Kinyume cha hapo atafundishwa na shule au watu wengine kwa kudharauliwa, kuchukiwa na kuadabishwa.”
Enock Maregesi

Cat Clarke
“Our midnight feasts aren't so much 'lashings of ginger beer' as 'whatever booze we can smuggle in'.”
Cat Clarke, Girlhood

Cat Clarke
“I should have known that the cruelty of girls is intensified here, living together 24/7, hundreds of miles away from home.”
Cat Clarke, Girlhood

“The forward momentum of British educations cannot be resisted: a relentless fascist machine that will spit them out the other side as soldiers or sexless governors-general and the like. All he can do is plant some small seed of independent thought in their minds. He is sorry for them and what is coming: every rottenness and corruption.”
Polly Clark, Larchfield