Serial(ized) Killers Tell All ... and Recommend Books

Posted by Cybil on April 30, 2017

Mystery & Thriller Week is sponsored by The Fact of a Body, a Goodreads Best Book of May.

Where would readers be without the beloved serialized sleuths from Hercule Poirot to Nancy Drew, those do-gooders, detectives, and generally preternaturally astute characters whom we return to book after book?

We asked some of Goodreads' most popular mystery and thriller serialized authors to tell us what it's meant to them to stay with their characters for the long haul. And since we're always looking for more books to read, we also asked them for book recommendations for their fans.

Check out these insights and recommendations from Dennis Lehane, Scott Turow, Michael Connelly, Charlaine Harris, David Baldacci, Alexander McCall Smith, Louise Penny, Joanne Fluke, and Jo Nesbø.

Dennis Lehane


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On staying with characters through a series:

"It's fun. Like hanging out with family. I've spent probably 2,300 pages, give or take, with Patrick Kenzie and Angie Gennaro and another 1,500 with the Coughlin Family. I know what's in their cupboards and what their sheets smell like. That's comforting and leads to a certainty with how they'd act in a given situation. And yet they still have the capacity to surprise me."

Book recommendations for his fans:

The author of the Kenzie & Gennaro series and the Coughlin series recommends…

The Last Good Kiss by James Crumley
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"The greatest private eye novel I've ever read. Beautifully written and perfectly realized on every level."


Unknown Man #89 by Elmore Leonard
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"Leonard had a knack for finding interesting angles into both working-class lives and grubby crime schemes. This one's about a process server, of all things, who gets in over his head when he's asked to track down the missing title character."


Black Cherry Blues by James Lee Burke
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"The first Burke I ever read. The characters are ten-dimensional, the action is furious and electric, and the prose is symphonic."


Scott Turow


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On staying with characters through a series:

"I wrote Presumed Innocent, for the most part, while I was working as a federal prosecutor, with only 30 minutes a day to write on the morning commuter train. As a result, it took seven years to finish the novel. I had thought—to start—that the book was set in Boston, but over time, as more and more of my daily experiences influenced what I was writing, the city became fictitious, more closely resembling Chicago, although a little smaller. Thus was born Kindle County.

Every novel that has followed is about a character from Kindle County, with figures from the earlier novels always making an appearance, albeit sometimes a very brief one. In Testimony, even though most of the action takes place around the International Criminal Court in Holland, my old friends, Rusty Sabich (Presumed Innocent, Innocent, and Limitations), Tommy Molto (Presumed Innocent, The Laws of Our Fathers, Innocent), Sonny Klonsky (The Burden of Proof, The Laws of Our Fathers), and the ever-present Sandy Stern, who has been mentioned in every novel, again skirt by briefly in the background. For me that gives the books a sense of continuity and connectedness that I feel in life. One of the deepest meanings of living in a place is the way people sometimes reinvent themselves in our lives, and I've tried to capture some of that by using the Kindle County setting in all my novels."

Book recommendations for his fans:

The author of the Kindle County Legal Thriller series says, "I'll leave John Grisham's books aside, since I don't think anyone would regard him as a 'discovery.' But let me name three other books that I regard as classic legal thrillers…"

Exile by Richard North Patterson
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"This is the story of an American Jewish lawyer called upon to represent a Palestinian woman who was his lover in law school, many years before. As recently as a few months ago, a Foreign Service officer in Israel praised the novel to me for its deep understanding of this continuing crisis."


A Married Man by Piers Paul Read
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"You'll have to scrounge the used bookstores to find it, but this story of a London criminal lawyer facing 40 impressed me deeply while I was writing Presumed Innocent."


Anatomy of a Murder by Robert Traver
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"Traver was the pseudonym of a Michigan appellate judge, John Voelker, who based his novel on a real murder trial in Michigan's remote Upper Peninsula. Anatomy was a giant hit when I was a boy, and it remains gripping today. Its accuracy about what goes on in a courtroom is something I've always tried to emulate."


Michael Connelly


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On staying with characters through a series:

"It's been a great ride. I first published a Harry Bosch book 25 years ago, and to think he is still going pretty strong—I'm writing the 20th Bosch novel now—is special beyond words. On top of that, I write contemporary novels pretty much set in the year they are published, so being able to take a character across time and show him evolving as his city and society evolve is an opportunity no writer should turn down. I have no regrets—except maybe if I could do it all over again, I would start Harry at age 35 instead of 42. It would give me more time with him."

Book recommendations for his fans:

The author of the Harry Bosch series says, "These are books and authors I would like to emulate: The Tin Roof Blowdown by James Lee Burke, In the Woods by Tana French, and IQ by Joe Ide."

Charlaine Harris


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On staying with characters through a series:

"I really enjoy sticking with characters through a series of books. After I've come up with an individual who interests me, I like to follow her life so I can find out how that individual handles change. Lives are not static: The protagonist and the other people in her world marry, get pregnant, have hearts broken, lose parents or loved ones, or suffer other tragedies. A character who never changes is a boring character."

Book recommendations for her fans:

The author of the Sookie Stackhouse series says, "I read a wide variety of novels that come under the same umbrella as my own. Of people working currently, I'd recommend…"

The Family Skeleton series by Leigh Perry
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"Leigh Perry's skeleton is named Sid, and he lives in the attic of Georgia Thackery's home. Georgia, a single mom and an adjunct professor, moves from college to college as she can find work. Sid, a walking, talking skeleton—and fond of terrible puns—is Georgia's best friend. He also has a lot of time on his hands, and nothing makes Sid happier than investigating a murder. Only Leigh Perry could make this believable, but she does, and the Sid books are great entertainment."


Deborah Knott series by Margaret Maron
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"Deborah Knott, a North Carolina judge, has a huge family of brothers, a moonshiner father, and a streak of integrity. Deborah's not holier-than-thou, but she's a strong and intelligent woman who has her share of problems, both personal and professional. A visit with Deborah makes me feel good about being a woman."


Kate Shugak series by Dana Stabenow
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"Dana Stabenow's Kate Shugak is an Aleut who's retired to the Park after a job as an investigator at the Anchorage D.A.'s office. Kate's both brave and competent. She lives on her own in the Alaskan wild, and she copes with bad critters of both the four-legged and the two-legged variety. Being a tribal member is a challenge for Kate (wait until you meet her grandmother and the aunties), and being a private investigator is equally challenging. If you like one of these books, you're in for a treat because there are quite a few in the series."


David Baldacci


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On staying with characters through a series:

"It's liberating in a way because it gives me more than one opportunity to deepen and evolve a character. It's also fun to hang with someone you've created and not just flick them away with a one and done. I've had a great time seeing characters like Will Robie and John Puller and Amos Decker evolve and move in directions I never could have imagined within the constraints of one book."

Book recommendations for his fans:

The author of the Camel Club series and Sean King & Michelle Maxwell series (among others) recommends Orphan X by Gregg Hurwitz, The General's Daughter by Nelson DeMille, and LA Requiem by Robert Crais.

Alan Bradley


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On staying with characters through a series:

"It's like watering the seed of an unknown plant. You never know what's going to come bursting up out of the soil. Characters grow in their own, and often unexpected, directions. Surprises abound. As an author, you learn from book to book that you can't impose your own ideas upon these living paper souls. Each of them seems to come equipped with a built-in map of what they are destined to become. It would be foolhardy of any writer to go against the wishes of these little gifts from the universe."

Book recommendations for his fans:

The author of the Flavia de Luce series recommends…


Still Life by Louise Penny
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"I love fellow Canadian Louise Penny's Inspector Gamache series. Her sense of place fills a deep need in us to step out of our own and into a more comfortable world—although not necessarily a safer one. Start with her first book, Still Life. You'll thank me."


The Nine Tailors by Dorothy L. Sayers
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" I love—no, adore!—Dorothy L. Sayers' Lord Peter Wimsey mysteries. They are, quite simply, books with brains. In all of mystery fiction, there's no finer writing than the ringing out of the church bells in The Nine Tailors. The Shakespeare of mystery writing."


Last Bus to Woodstock by Colin Dexter
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"The Inspector Morse series by Colin Dexter, who passed away recently. He was a lovely and a gentle man, and it shows in his books—in spite of the murders! The first Morse book is Last Bus to Woodstock."


Alexander McCall Smith


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On staying with characters through a series:

"One of the great delights about writing a series of books is that you become extremely familiar with the characters, their backgrounds, their likes and dislikes, and their hopes and fears. Going back each year to a new book in the series is like taking up once more a conversation that you put aside the previous year. I find that with each book the characters become more real to me—to the extent that they are now part of my day-to-day life. That is not to say that I am never surprised by what they do—I am often surprised by developments that occur in their lives that I had not anticipated!"

Book recommendations for his fans:

The author of the The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency series recommends…

Sidney Chambers and the Perils of the Night by James Runcie
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"This is one of Runcie's highly regarded Grantchester Mysteries series, set in Cambridgeshire."


The Perfect Murder by H.R.F. Keating
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"This is the first Inspector Ghote mystery by the much appreciated H.R.F Keating, former mystery critic of the London Times."


Recipes for Love and Murder by Sally Andrew
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"This is the first Tannie Maria mystery by the South African writer Sally Andrew."


Louise Penny


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On staying with characters through a series:

"When I started the first book, I knew I wanted it to be a series if I was lucky enough to be published. But I also realized there were hazards. Growing tired of the characters was one. So I thought about that. There seemed no guarantee, but it seemed the best way to do it was to create characters I'd choose as lifelong friends—because that's what they'd be. Or, if they can't all be friends, they can at least be compelling. Like Scarlett O'Hara. Not necessarily someone you'd want in your foxhole, but impossible, really, to ignore."

Book recommendations for her fans:

For her recommendations, the author of the Chief Inspector Armand Gamache series says…

Cover Her Face by P.D. James
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"This is the first of her books featuring Scotland Yard Detective Chief Inspector Adam Dalgliesh—in fact, it's her debut novel. I always think it is miraculous to discover a writer you love and be able to go back to the beginning and see the evolution of the characters and the writer. It all started with this book. Wonderful."


Garden of Lamentations by Deborah Crombie
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"Having said it is great to start at the beginning of a series, I'm recommending my friend Debs' latest. She started out as a fabulous writer and just gets better and better. Her Duncan Kincaid and Gemma James characters are rich, emotionally textured, fully human. They are the remarkable creations of a remarkable writer."


In Farleigh Field by Rhys Bowen
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"I rarely agree to endorse books anymore, not because I don't want to—I very much do—but because time is short and my energy is low and there are so many lovely requests. (I am also a very slow reader.) But when Rhys asked if I'd read In Farleigh Field, in manuscript, I could not say 'yes' fast enough. I am a huge fan of her work. The Royal Spyness series. Her Molly Murphy series. But In Farleigh Field is a whole other beast. A stand-alone novel set in the Second World War, it is, quite simply, brilliant with her trademark clarity, humanity, and perfect balance of research and throbbing plot. You will love it."


Joanne Fluke


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On staying with characters through a series:

"Dealing with the same characters in a lengthy series is great fun! Everyone in Lake Eden, Minnesota, has become a friend of mine. (OK, maybe not the killers but everyone else!) I wrote stand-alone mysteries before I started the Hannah Swensen series, and I always felt a sense of loss when the book was finished and I knew I'd never 'see' those characters again.

When I first began writing about Hannah, I had a three-book contract with Kensington Publishing. I knew Hannah would be in three books, but I had no clue that the Murder She Baked series would extend to 22 books (and counting!). I've known Hannah for over 20 years now. I guess you could say that she's my best friend. I've occasionally turned around in a grocery store to ask Hannah what she thinks of the new brand of chocolate chips on the shelf (please don't tell anyone else about this. I think it probably makes me certifiable)."

Book recommendations for her fans:

The author of the Hannah Swensen mysteries recommends these three authors:

Agatha Christie
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"The first is Agatha Christie. Start anywhere in any of her mystery series and you will be hooked."


Laura Levine
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"The second author is Laura Levine, who writes the Jaine Austen series. That's also a long-running series, and Laura's books are laugh-out-loud funny."


Carolyn Keene
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"The third series is one I read when I was a child and remember with great fondness. It's the Nancy Drew series."


Jo Nesbø


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On staying with characters through a series:

"It gives me room to explore the character's mind as it is, but also to show him evolving, changing, getting new insight, repeating his old mistakes and making some new ones. I guess at a certain age you get more interested in the many still undiscovered facets in the personality of an old friend [rather] than having to start all over with a new one."

Book recommendations for his fans:

The author of the Harry Hole series says, "If what I like to read is anything to go by, Jim Thompson at his best is brilliant, The Killer Inside Me and Pop. 1280 probably being the best…. Hmm, perhaps better to ask in the bookstore?"

What are your favorite serialized mysteries and thrillers? Tell us in the comments. And be sure to check out more of our Mystery & Thriller Week coverage here.

Fact of the Body

Comments Showing 1-50 of 85 (85 new)


message 1: by Betsy (last edited Apr 30, 2017 07:15PM) (new)

Betsy The In Death series by J.D. Robb (Nora Roberts), which consists of about 50 novels and shorter pieces. It contains a lot of plot variety. In one book the heroine, Eve Dallas, will be solving a single murder, in another she has to find a serial killer, in another she has to stop a terrorist plot, and in another she uncovers a human clone factory. Of course, with so many books, there is some inevitable echoing, and some are better than others, but I always devour each new book within a day of publication. What I especially love about the series is that the overarching subject of the series is family. Eve had a horrific childhood, coming from parents who were monsters and treated her accordingly. But she recovered and married the most desirable man in the countr. We get to watch as her marriage strenghthens and grows, through fights and crises, and Eve's awkward discovery of the "marriage rules". And over the years she has made her own family of friends and coworkers, who develop along with Eve as their lives progress.


Erin *Proud Book Hoarder* Fun recommendations and answers - will have to add some of these to the list definitely.


Voluntarystress The Fiona Griffiths series by Harry Bingham featuring a very different type of female detective. This unique series has now reached book six, everyone of them a gem.


message 4: by Peter (last edited May 01, 2017 12:36PM) (new)

Peter Mcc The Inspector Rostnikov series of 16 novels by Stuart Kaminsky is superb for deepening character development over a tumultuous period of recent Soviet and Russian history. Not only do we get to observe the growth of Rostnikov's character over time, but we also see the development of a continuing ensemble of characters over the progress of their careers. Not least, the insights into Russian culture and life and the inventive crime plots, complicated by tricky political minefields and interwoven into the personal lives of the ensemble characters, never fail to be ingenious and satisfying. To date, I've read 14 of them, and only 2 remain, alas. Sometimes locating the earlier books requires a bit of scrounging on the used market, but it's worth the effort. I recommend reading them in order, for the sake of cumulative details and overall series development, but each book is a standalone read. The payoff to reading them sequentially is that they just get better as Kaminsky hones his craft.


message 5: by Viv (new)

Viv Betsy wrote: "The In Death series by J.D. Robb (Nora Roberts), which consists of about 50 novels and shorter pieces. It contains a lot of plot variety. In one book the heroine, Eve Dallas, will be..."

I agree. I've also read every one of her books and always look forward to the next.


message 6: by Kathy (new)

Kathy Voluntarystress wrote: "The Fiona Griffiths series by Harry Bingham featuring a very different type of female detective. This unique series has now reached book six, everyone of them a gem."
I love these books! Highly recommended.


message 7: by Mary (new)

Mary Ahlgren The Siri Paiboun series by Colin Cotterill and the Tibetan mysteries by Alan Pattison are both remarkably good!


message 8: by Michael (last edited May 02, 2017 12:58AM) (new)

Michael For mysteries and thrillers featuring recurring characters it would be a sin of epic proportions to leave out John Sandford's Prey series and his Virgil Flower series. The first is long standing with the Rules of Prey being the debut of Lucas Davenport, 1989. The last to date, Golden Prey was released last month. Dark Of The Moon began the Virgil Flowers series though Virgil had appeared in some of the Prey novels.

Yet another series that shouldn't be overlooked is the 87th Precinct series by the late Ed McBain.

But homage needs to be paid to two early series creators; Edgar Allen Poe who created C. Auguste Dupin in three works. And then, possibly the best known detective of all time was Sherlock Holmes, the creation of A. Conan Doyle who admitted readily that Poe was an influence.

I'm know there are many others. No list covering such a subject can be complete and there will also be differences of opinion. But I stand by the ones I've mentioned.


message 9: by MichaelR (new)

MichaelR Reginald Hill's Dalziel and Pascoe series riveted me for years. Of course, the plotting and character development is extraordinary, but most of all I loved the sheer mischievous erudition of the writer. His language and literary knowledge were profound but lightly worn. Reading these books, I laughed at least as much as I marvelled!
It is a very sad thing that he has left us now.


message 10: by Jenny (new)

Jenny Voluntarystress wrote: "The Fiona Griffiths series by Harry Bingham featuring a very different type of female detective. This unique series has now reached book six, everyone of them a gem."

Yay, a fellow fan of Harry Bingham! :-)


message 11: by Kathy (new)

Kathy Michael wrote: "For mysteries and thrillers featuring recurring characters it would be a sin of epic proportions to leave out John Sandford's Prey series and his Virgil Flower series. The first is long standing wi..."

Excellent observation. Love them all.


message 12: by Kathy (new)

Kathy Jenny wrote: "Voluntarystress wrote: "The Fiona Griffiths series by Harry Bingham featuring a very different type of female detective. This unique series has now reached book six, everyone of them a gem."

Yay, ..."


I, too, love Harry Bingham's Fiona Griffiths.


message 13: by Richard (new)

Richard Gray While there are many great series, the Ian Rankin Rebus books are my favorite.


message 14: by ScrappyMags (last edited May 02, 2017 06:01AM) (new)

ScrappyMags The Cork O'Connor books by William Kent Krueger are some of my faves. He integrates Native American aspects into his novels, which take place in Minnesota. He has my heart being a Michigan girl myself. His gift of painting mental pictures while engaging you in mystery has me hooked.

My other addiction is Michael Connelly. Particularly the Harry Bosch series but I pretty much love all of his books. Much more gritty, rougher characters, usually a rebel. Love!


message 15: by Kathy (new)

Kathy Maggie wrote: "The Cork O'Connor books by William Kent Krueger is one of my faves. He integrates Native American aspects into his novels, which take place in Minnesota. He has my heart being a Mich..."

Michael Connelly is the best!


message 16: by Michael (new)

Michael Kathy wrote: "Maggie wrote: "The Cork O'Connor books by William Kent Krueger is one of my faves. He integrates Native American aspects into his novels, which take place in Minnesota. He has my hea..."

I've only read one of Krueger's books but I liked it and have more of his books on my to read list. It amazes me how many Minnesotans are mystery/thriller writers; John Sandford, PJ Tracy, Owen Laukkanen is an incomplete list.


message 17: by ScrappyMags (new)

ScrappyMags Michael wrote: "Kathy wrote: "Maggie wrote: "The Cork O'Connor books by William Kent Krueger is one of my faves. He integrates Native American aspects into his novels, which take place in Minnesota...."one of his books was on a "best" list - Vermillion Drift and I read that first. Then I was hooked and read the first 9! Little did I know book 10 is pretty pivotal so I don't recommend starting there lol. But to me his books just get better and better.


message 18: by Betsy (new)

Betsy MichaelR wrote: "Reginald Hill's Dalziel and Pascoe series riveted me for years. Of course, the plotting and character development is extraordinary, but most of all I loved the sheer mischievous erudition of the wr..."

I totally agree. The Dalziel/Pascoe series was excellent. I also liked the tv series.


message 19: by Peter (last edited May 02, 2017 10:51PM) (new)

Peter Mcc The Arkady Renko series by Martin Cruz Smith. Start at the beginning with the incomparable Gorky Park and you'll be hooked.


message 20: by Charles (new)

Charles D Among many good historical mystery series are Steven Saylor's ROMA SUB ROMA ancient Rome novels featuring Gordianus the "Finder" (detective and snitch) which does a great job of weaving true history with Gordianus' participation beginning with Cicero's actual account of a young man accused of fratricide ...and British author Lindsey Davis with her Marcus Didius Falco, a rogue, irreverent detective in a slightly different time period (Vespian)...


message 21: by Russell (new)

Russell One all-time favorite series that is under appreciated is R Austin Freeman's Doctor Thorndyke series. These books are all in public domain so they are easy to get hold of. These are the books that Agatha Christie read for pleasure. They are magnificent, full of Edwardian era science and manners.


message 22: by Joann (new)

Joann Mccann Peter May's trilogy set in the Hebrides starting with Blackhouse is my all-time favourite. He is a wonderful writer and as a family member mentioned one can visualize the land, the weather and his characters. His other series are excellent too.


message 23: by Craig (new)

Craig As a reader who has read every Harry Bosch book and all of the serialized characters by Baldacci, I think of many other authors in this genre that I like and who deserve a mention. One is Robert Crais who was recommended by Connelly. One commenter mentioned John Sandford; he is not to be missed. But three others that are worth investigating are Harlan Coben, Robert Parker, and Les Roberts. Parker created the unforgettable character Spenser, and Roberts has Milan Jacovich, who is in many ways a lot like Spenser. Still another to check out is Jeffery Deaver whose Lincoln Rhyme is somewhat of a modern-day Sherlock Holmes with his deductive abilities.


message 24: by Dulce (new)

Dulce I can´t nomenee one author, our series, i have some favorites mistery books.
Tess Gerritsen; Rizzoli e Isles Series;
Karin Slaughter; Will Trent Series;
Jo Nesbo; Harry Hole Series;
J. D. Robb; Mortal Series;
M.J. Arlidge; Serie Helen Grace;
Tami Hoag
If i see my background i can say i start mistery long time ago with Agatha Christie.


message 25: by Kathy (new)

Kathy Craig wrote: "As a reader who has read every Harry Bosch book and all of the serialized characters by Baldacci, I think of many other authors in this genre that I like and who deserve a mention. One is Robert Cr..."

You've mentioned so many of my favorites here, plus a couple I need to check out. Thanks!


message 26: by Joel (new)

Joel Let's not forget one of the first, and perhaps the best, writers of the serial genre--Raymond Chandler. Phillip Marlowe may be the first of the hard boiled private eyes. I just re-read THE LONG GOODBYE (Phillip Marlowe #6) and it's still as gripping today as it was in 1953 when it was published.


message 27: by Earl (new)

Earl Betsy wrote: "MichaelR wrote: "Reginald Hill's Dalziel and Pascoe series riveted me for years. Of course, the plotting and character development is extraordinary, but most of all I loved the sheer mischievous er..."

I read every one of the books in the series. The interplay between the street wise Dalziel and the college educated Pascoe is superb. I also agree with the comment about the TV series. It was beautifully cast.


message 28: by Diana (new)

Diana I'm a big fan of the Nora Gavin series by Erin Hart. I find Nora's background as a forensic archaeologist specializing in bog bodies fascinating, love that most of the stories take place in Ireland, and love the character and backstory development as the series goes on. You'll want to begin with the first one, Haunted Ground. Can't wait for the next one!


message 29: by Superbambi (new)

Superbambi Somehow I never ever see Maurice Leblanc's Arsène Lupin novels mentioned here. Great stories where the thief is the hero, and more than one step ahead of the detective.


message 30: by Kathryn (new)

Kathryn Mary wrote: "The Siri Paiboun series by Colin Cotterill and the Tibetan mysteries by Alan Pattison are both remarkably good!"

and also Colin Cotterill's Jimm Juree series - *true* events are included also.


message 31: by Karin (new)

Karin Along with Poirot and Holmes, I would have to add Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe and Archie Goodwin.


message 32: by Janice (new)

Janice Hate books about serial killers --fiction and/or non-fiction. Sick, sick,sick...


Will Dreamly Arts Publishing The Newirth Mythology is a trilogy written by author Michael B. Koep. This series continues to slip under the radar but I suspect it's not long before Koep becomes a blockbuster.
The Invasion of Heaven (The Newirth Mythology, #1) by Michael B. Koep


message 34: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Zeagler I read The Last Good Kiss by James Crumley many years ago and it still stands out in my mind as one of the best mystery novels I've read. A movie was made from the book also. Thanks for the recommendation! I plan to read it again!


message 35: by Pam (new)

Pam John Sanford's Prey, Kidd and Flowers series.
Kathy Reichs' Bones Series
Robert Crais' Elvis Cole and Joe Pike
Robert Parker's Spenser.
Lee Child's Reacher
Have read most of the authors mentioned in the blog.


message 36: by Kate (new)

Kate Ariana Franklin's Mistress of the Art of Death series is another that was wonderful but too short as the author passed.


message 37: by Kathryn (new)

Kathryn Janice wrote: "Hate books about serial killers --fiction and/or non-fiction. Sick, sick,sick..."

You do realize that the heading is a *play on words* - -
Serial(ized) Killers - - actually that goes on to say *serialized sleuths* and *serialized authors*. . . not about serial killers, or by serial killers.


message 38: by Loretta (new)

Loretta Lee Mark Billingham's Tom Thorne series is one of my absolute favorites! Just finished my twelfth. I also love Jussi Adler-Olsen's Department Q novels and Henning Mankell's Kurt Wallender.


message 39: by Sheldon (new)

Sheldon Wiebe I can recommend a number of series that feature engaging characters who evolve over the course of the series.

For the genre of urban fantasy there are: Jim Butcher's Dresden Files, Ben Aaronovitch's Peter Grant novels, Carrie Vaughn's Kitty Norville novels and Faith Hunter's Jane Yellowrock tales - and that's just off the top of my head.

The regular cast in each series will show new depths walmost with each additional page and the plotting is usually delightfully twisted.

I can also recommend the following series in the less magical, more-or-less real world: Richard Stark's Parker novels, Robert B. Parker's Spenser and Jesse Stone books, Lee Child's Reacher (the plots are wildly divergent, but Reacher's very specific set of skills adapt in interesting ways to face each new challenge), and, of course, Michael Connolly's Bosch series (love the TV series, too!).


message 40: by M M (new)

M M Culp Elizabeth George's Thomas Lynley is my favorite!


message 41: by Kathy (new)

Kathy Kathryn wrote: "Janice wrote: "Hate books about serial killers --fiction and/or non-fiction. Sick, sick,sick..."

You do realize that the heading is a *play on words* - -
Serial(ized) Killers - - actually that go..."



Thank you for pointing this out to this person who misunderstood.


message 42: by Kathy (new)

Kathy Loretta wrote: "Mark Billingham's Tom Thorne series is one of my absolute favorites! Just finished my twelfth. I also love Jussi Adler-Olsen's Department Q novels and Henning Mankell's Kurt Wallender."
I love both of these writers--excellent books.


message 43: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth For continuing series, my favourites are Elizabeth George, Susan Hill and Graham Hurley. One really becomes friends with the characters and they start to feel like family. I am very disappointed that Susan Hill will not be writing another Serrallier mystery. Loved that whole family! Will miss them!


message 44: by Tom (last edited May 03, 2017 09:08PM) (new)

Tom Try Clinton McKinzie's (http://www.clintonmckinzie.com) Antonio Burns novels. The characters (including Antonio's edgy, nomadic brother Berto) are very much three-dimensional and the setting in America's Wyoming region is evocative and memorable, and McKinzie makes the Burns brothers' obsession with mountain climbing easy to imagine. Start with Point of Law, which is a prequel to his debut novel. Then read the debut novel, The Edge of Justice. These were the first two of his I read, at the time in paperback, and both had false promo covers: Get the Point and Get the Edge. Very clever marketing with a not terribly subtle double-entendre. You can see all the book covers here (https://www.fictiondb.com/author/clin...). Read them and you'll be hooked and will then want to read them all. Of course, I am hopeful that Clinton McKinzie will release more Antonio Burns novels -- his pen has been quiet for too long.


message 45: by Sheldon (new)

Sheldon Wiebe Kathy wrote: "Loretta wrote: "Mark Billingham's Tom Thorne series is one of my absolute favorites! Just finished my twelfth. I also love Jussi Adler-Olsen's Department Q novels and Henning Mankell's Kurt Wallend..."

I haven't read the Department Q books, but I love the three TV movies enough that I'm looking to check out the books.


message 46: by Yashoda (new)

Yashoda Jordan Dulce wrote: "I can´t nomenee one author, our series, i have some favorites mistery books.
Tess Gerritsen; Rizzoli e Isles Series;
Karin Slaughter; Will Trent Series;
[author:Jo N..."


You mean MYSTERY?


message 47: by Warren (new)

Warren McManus I think Patricia Cornwell and her Kay Scarpetta series deserve a mention.


message 48: by Dirk (new)

Dirk My Favorit is Ian Rankins John Rebus. A detective in Schottlands main city Edinburgh. From the beginning the character changes in his motives, from the beginning in Knotts and CrossesKnots and Crosses as a optimistic inspector to the last one Rather Be the Devil where he is discouraged but still working. The books describe the city and the life so clear that I allways wanted to visit it. And when I went there, I was not realy surprised to see the city like in the books.


message 49: by Dan (new)

Dan The early Parker novels are outstanding, as Spenser solves crimes and prepares gourmet meals (with recipes) for the love of his life, Susan Silverman. Later novels became repetitive. It is hard to believe, that in all of the prior comments on this issue, no one has mentioned John D. MacDonald novels. The character of Travis McGee predates Spenser and is without equal.


message 50: by Warren (new)

Warren McManus I second the nomination of John D. MacDonald and Travis. I've read them all at least twice.


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