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message 1: by Louise (last edited Dec 31, 2014 01:40PM) (new)

Louise Not planning to read all 100 books but that doesn't mean I can't join in keeping track of what I have read and plan to read from it.

Read:
1. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen - 5 Stars
2. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - 5 Stars
3. 1984 by George Orwell - Need to Reread
4. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by J.K. Rowling - 5 Stars
5. Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King by J.R.R. Tolkien - Need to reread
6. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by J.K. Rowling - 5 Stars
7. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte - 4 Stars
8. Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring by J.R.R. Tolkien - Need to reread
9. The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger - 1 Star
10. Dracula by Bram Stoker - 5 Stars
11. Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by J.K. Rowling - 5 Stars
12. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J.K. Rowling - 5 Stars
13. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by J.K. Rowling - 5 Stars
14. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince by J.K. Rowling - 5 Stars
15. Life of Pi by Yann Martel - 3 Stars
16. Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers by J.R.R. Tolkien - Need to reread
17. Matilda by Roald Dahl - 5 Stars
18. Persuasion by Jane Austen - 4.5 Stars
19. The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger - Need to reread
20. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis - Need to reread
21. Angus, Thongs and Full-Frontal Snogging by Louise Rennison - 2 Stars
22. Emma by Jane Austen - 4.5 Stars
23. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by J.K. Rowling - 5 Stars
24. Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden - 1 Star
25. Northern Lights by Phillip Pullman - 5 Stars
26. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy - 4 stars
27. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl - 4 Stars
28. Cirque de Freak by Darren Shan - 3 Stars
29. One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez - 5 Stars
30. Sabriel by Garth Nix - 3 Stars
31. Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen - 3.5 Stars
32. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte - 2 Stars
33. The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood 4 Stars

Own, will definitely read:
34. Tess of the D’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
35. David Copperfield by Charles Dickens

Unread, may or may not be interested in reading:
36. Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery
37. Outlander by Diana Gabaldon (Cross Stitch in UK)
38. A Fine Balance by Rohinton Mistry
39. Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
40. Fall On Your Knees by Ann-Marie MacDonald
41. Little Women by L.M. Alcott
42. The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
43. Angela’s Ashes by Frank McCourt
44. Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurty
45. Love You Forever by Robert Munsch
46. The Poisonwood Bible by Barabra Kingsolver
47. The Stone Angel by Margaret Laurence
48. A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
49. Blindness by Jose Saramago
50. Hoot by Carl Hiaasen
51. Jurassic Park by Micheal Crichton
52. On the Road by Jack Kerouac
53. Roots by Alex Haley
54. The Husband by Dean Koontz
55. The Lizard Cage by Karen Connelly
56. The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
57. The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
58. The Stand by Stephen King
59. The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield
60. Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen
61. A Million Little Pieces by James Frey
62. A Room with a View by E.M. Forster
63. A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
64. Year of Wonders by Geraldine Brooks
65. Confessions of a Shopaholic by Sophie Kinsella
66. Deadly Appearances by Gail Bowen
67. Exodus by Leon Uris
68. Expecting Adam by Martha Beck
69. Five Smooth Stones by Anne Fairbairn
70. Jack Maggs by Peter Carey
71. Jennie: The Life of Lady Randolph Churchill by Ralph Martin
72. Little House on the Prairie by Laura Ingalls Wilder
73. Lucky Jim by Kingsley Amis
74. Murder Must Advertise by Dorothy L. Sayers
75. My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult
76. Nineteen Minutes by Jodi Picoult
77. North and South by John Jakes
78. Not Wanted on the Voyage by Timothy Findley
79. Scarlet Feather by Maeve Binchy
80. Shadow of the Moon by M.M. Kaye
81. The Bourne Identity by Robert Ludlum
82. The Cure for Death by Lightning by Gail Anderson-Dargatz
83. The Englishman’s Boy by Guy Vanderhaeghe
84. The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck
85. Journey to the River Sea by Eva Ibbotson
86. The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold
87. The Red Tent by Anita Diamant
88. The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd
89. The Shell Seekers by Rosamunde Pilcher
90. Swallows of Kabul by Yasmina Khadra
91. The Way the Crow Flies by Ann-Marie MacDonald
92. True History f the Kelly Gang by Peter Carey
93. What Came Before He Shot Her by Elizabeth George
94. Without Remorse by Tom Clancy

Don't have any intention of reading:
95. The Bible
96. The Clan of the Cave Bear by Jean M. Auel
97. Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
98. The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand
99. Eragon by Christopher Paolini
100. The No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency by Alexander McCall Smith


message 2: by Louise (last edited Aug 07, 2015 11:29AM) (new)

Louise And now for my list of 100 books I definitely want to read (will take me a while to finalise list and I'm trying to cut down on multiple books from 1 or 2 series clogging it up so it's a little flexible at the moment).

* = books I own
† = books I can borrow from home
‡ = books I have on loan

37/100

1. The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood - 4 Stars
2. Villette by Charlotte Brontë *
3. The Complete Cosmicomics by Italo Calvino- Partly Read
4. The Hunger Games, Suzanne Collins - 4 stars
5. David Copperfield by Charles Dickens *
6. Bleak House by Charles Dickens *
7. Hard Times by Charles Dickens *
8. Great Expectations by Charles Dickens *
9. The Last Werewolf by Glen Duncan *
10. The Mill on the Floss , George Eliot - 3.5 Stars
11. The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling, Henry Fielding - 3 Stars
12. North and South, Elizabeth Gaskell - 3 stars
13. Tess of the d'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy *
14. The Hundred-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out of the Window and Disappeared, Jonas Jonasson - 3.5 Stars
15. A Storm of Swords, George R.R. Martin - 4.5 stars
16. A Feast for Crows, George R.R. Martin - 3.5 stars
17. A Dance With Dragons, George R.R. Martin - 4 stars
18. Moby Dick, Herman Melville - 3 Stars
19. The Mark of Athena, Rick Riordan - 4 Stars
20. The House of Hades Rick Riordan - 4 Stars
21. Venus in Furs by Leopold von Sacher-Masoch *
22. Vanity Fair , William Makepeace Thackeray - 4 Stars
23. Barchester Towers by Anthony Trollope *
24. The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There, Catherynne M. Valente - 5 Stars
25. The Island of Dr. Moreau, H.G. Wells - 4.5 stars
26. The War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells *
27. The Arabian Nights: Tales of 1001 Nights by Anonymous - CURRENTLY READING
28. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley *
29. The Book Thief, Markus Zusak - 3 stars
30. Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
31. Lord of the Flies by William Golding
32. The Milkman in the Night by Andrey Kurkov
33. I, Claudius by Robert Graves
34. Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
35. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon
36. Neverwhere OR The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman
37. Perdido Street Station , China Miéville - 5 Stars
38. The Monk by Matthew Gregory Lewis
39. Notre-Dame de Paris by Victor Hugo
40. The Black Tulip by Alexandre Dumas
41. The Women's War by Alexandre Dumas
42. The Toilers of the Sea by Victor Hugo
43. Tales from Two Pockets by Karel Čapek
44. The Master and Margarita , Mikhail Bulgakov - 3.5 stars
45. Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez
46. The Once and Future King by T.H. White
47. The Casual Vacancy , J.K. Rowling - 4.5 stars
48. Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra*
49. Lady Susan, Jane Austen - 4 stars
50. Temeraire, Naomi Novik - 3.5 stars
51. The Dog Stars by Peter Heller
52. Deathless, Catherynne M. Valente - 4.5 stars
53. No Name by Wilkie Collins
54. The Long Ships by Frans G. Bengtsson*
55. A Dream of Spring (unpublished) by George R.R. Martin
56. The Blood of Olympus , Rick Riordan - 4.5 stars
57. The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
58. The Complete Stories by Edgar Allan Poe - Partly read(14/68)
59. Daniel Deronda by George Eliot*
60. The Color Purple by Alice Walker
61. The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison
62. [Something by] Franz Kafka
63. Fictions by Jorge Luis Borges
64. The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
65. No Surrender by Constance Maud
66. [Something by] Karen Maitland
67. The Old Man and His Sons, Heðin Brú - 3 Stars
68. A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess
69. The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Brontë
70. The Council of Mirrors , Michael Buckley - 2 Stars
71. Breakfast at Tiffany's, Truman Capote - 3 Stars
72. Call for the Dead John le Carré - 3 Stars
73. Pushkin Hills by Sergei Dovlatov
74. Fairyland #5 (unpublished) by Catherynne M. Valente
75. The Victorian Chaise Longue by Marghanita Laski
76. Broken Homes, Ben Aaronovitch - 4.75 stars
77. The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
78. Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys
79. The Orphan's Tales by Catherynne M. Valente *
80. The Call of the Wild, White Fang, and Other Stories by Jack London
93. The Cuckoo's Calling , Robert Galbraith - 3.5 Stars
82. Aunts Aren't Gentlemen by P.G. Wodehouse
83. The Yellow Birds by Kevin Powers*
84. Nation by Terry Pratchett
85. The Forsyte Saga by John Galsworthy*
86. The Jewel in the Crown by Paul Scott
87. Three Men in a Boat, Jerome K. Jerome - 3 Stars
88. Zone: A Prison Camp Guard's Story by Sergei Dovlatov
89. Adventures of Sindbad by Gyula Krúdy - Partly Read
90. Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
91. Light, Michael Grant - 3 Stars
93. Burial Rites, by Hannah Kent - 4.5 Stars
93. The Scarlet Letter, Nathaniel Hawthorne - 3 Stars
94. The Blade Itself, Joe Abercrombie - 3.5 stars
95. A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole*
96. Birdsong, Sebastian Faulks - 3 Stars
97. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman by Laurence Sterne
98. House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski
99. Faithful Ruslan, Georgi Vladimov - 4 Stars
100. The Gods Will Have Blood, Anatole France


message 3: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 343 comments Mod
You have already read so many. I just finished David Copperfield and I recommend highly.


message 4: by Louise (new)

Louise It's the Harry Potter and Lord of the Rings that are bulking up the count, I think. I haven't even heard of many of the remaining ones - so will be interesting to check them out.

Def intend to read David Copperfield, but probably not all that soon - need to read Bleak House first and then will probably need a break from Dickens for a bit.


message 5: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 343 comments Mod
MMmmmm, he is a bit full on is Dickens isn't he? He is good, but wears me out for months!!


message 6: by Louise (new)

Louise I never enjoyed him when they tried to make me read him at school. Picked up Oliver Twist a while ago though and found it really good (sickly oversentimental in places but really fun in others) so have been convinced to try more of his stuff.

We'll see how I fare. Though I enjoyed the last book of his I read, I still seem to have a bit of a mental aversion left over from school. Keep finding excuses to postpone picking up Bleak House even though I know I do want to read it.


message 7: by Bev (new)

Bev (greenginger) | 137 comments Hi do give Eragon and Clan of the cave bear a try, both are really good.


message 8: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 343 comments Mod
I don't remember seeing A Christmas Carol on this list but that is an easy and refreshing Dickens.


message 9: by Bev (new)

Bev (greenginger) | 137 comments Nicolle wrote: "I don't remember seeing A Christmas Carol on this list but that is an easy and refreshing Dickens."

One of the best Nicolle. Brilliant book.


message 10: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 343 comments Mod
It really is isn't it?! I think it is the best introduction to Dickens. I started Oliver but found it boring and it was eventually due at the library so gave it back and didn't feel up to getting it again.


message 11: by Bev (new)

Bev (greenginger) | 137 comments Nicolle wrote: "It really is isn't it?! I think it is the best introduction to Dickens. I started Oliver but found it boring and it was eventually due at the library so gave it back and didn't feel up to getting i..."

Dickens is a great story teller but the language is often difficult to follow in this day and age. I think Christmas Carol is good for all ages.


message 12: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 343 comments Mod
It is I agree. I am hoping to be a Primary school teacher and I think books like this aren't beyond the older kids' reach.

It must be great to have a nine year old girl. :)


message 13: by Bev (last edited Mar 12, 2013 02:48PM) (new)

Bev (greenginger) | 137 comments Nicolle wrote: "It is I agree. I am hoping to be a Primary school teacher and I think books like this aren't beyond the older kids' reach.

It must be great to have a nine year old girl. :)"


It is and she is so clever. She reads as much as me if not more. She has read Harry Potter, Eragon, The Hobbit and many more. I also have a nearly 5 year old daughter who is just starting to read for herself and a 3 year old son. They are all book mad and the house is stuffed with books. My hubby might read one book a year if lucky!!

My 9 year old also wants to teach.


message 14: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 343 comments Mod
How lovely that they are all little book worms! I wanted to teach when I was very young too, then it changed about 30 times ranging from archeologist, forensic scientist, to lawyer. I went back to teaching in the end, mainly for enjoyment, job security and the holidays as I plan to have a few kids and having the same holidays will be handy. (though that is a long way off yet!)

I can't say I know any person in real life who reads actual books. It's shocking!!

I noticed on your profile that you live in Yorkshire. I love Yorkshire and want to live there when I'm settled down. I just love the country side. I currently live in the bit of Lancashire as near to West Yorkshire without actually being in it.


message 15: by Bev (new)

Bev (greenginger) | 137 comments Nicolle wrote: "How lovely that they are all little book worms! I wanted to teach when I was very young too, then it changed about 30 times ranging from archeologist, forensic scientist, to lawyer. I went back to ..."

My friend lives out that way near Littleborough. My hubby knows Preston as he used to go there for work.
Wherabouts in Yorkshire do you want to live?
I would have loved to teach but I went a different path.


message 16: by Louise (new)

Louise Bev wrote: "Hi do give Eragon and Clan of the cave bear a try, both are really good."

Sorry, it was a pretty well informed decision to avoid these two books. I've read plenty of extracts, heard plot descriptions, listened to people talk about them and I just don't think either would be books I could enjoy. I won't say I'll never read them and I'll be happy to eat y words if I do enjoy them, but with so many other books out there I'm more interested in reading I can't really see myself picking either of these up.

@Nicole: I don't think A Christmas Carol is on the list, but I've read it anyway. Is def a nice simple introductory read for Dickens. That and his other ghost stories, but they're a veeeery mixed bag in terms of quality. It's the big scary novels I'm scared of! (though I must have watched adaptations of almost all of them)

Also Yorkshire is lovely and primary school teaching is cool! I want to get into Museum Education, rather than teaching, but I do love working with that age group.


message 17: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 343 comments Mod
@ Bev
I really love Howarth and that area, but so much of Yorkshire I haven't been to so wouldn't rule anything out really (except a city which I wouldn't want to live near). I'm about half an hour from Preston (which is great for shopping!) though I am probably closer to Yorkshire. What career did you go to?

@Louise
What other ghost stories does Dickens have? I tried A Tale of Two Cities and couldn't get through it, though it was when I first got into reading so I might not have been mature enough of a reader to read it (was about 14 if I remember correctly). By museum education, do you mean like doing talks, and activities and things with the kids who come in?


message 18: by Bev (new)

Bev (greenginger) | 137 comments Nicolle wrote: "@ Bev
I really love Howarth and that area, but so much of Yorkshire I haven't been to so wouldn't rule anything out really (except a city which I wouldn't want to live near). I'm about half an ho..."


I ended up working in the Police until I had my children. Not much difference really!!


message 19: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 343 comments Mod
:)


message 20: by Louise (last edited Mar 14, 2013 06:19AM) (new)

Louise Nicolle wrote: "What other ghost stories does Dickens have? I tried A Tale of Two Cities and couldn't get through it, though it was when I first got into reading so I might not have been mature enough of a reader to read it (was about 14 if I remember correctly). By museum education, do you mean like doing talks, and activities and things with the kids who come in? "

The Signalman is his most famous ghost story (besides A Christmas Carol) but he wrote a fair few and they're mostly pretty short. His stuff's quite interesting (and very varied) in that he didn't just stick to 'scary' ghost stories but also wrote comic ones, 'moral lesson' ones ( a la Christmas Carol) and other sorts of ones as well. Personally I wasn't that fond of most of them, but I liked a fair few and it did help me get over my 'Dickens is big and scary and big' aprehensions.

And yeah, sorta. Museum education covers the whole spectrum of learning in museums from just having an 'activity room/education centre' for kids/families visiting the museum, to running drop in activities, arranging trips and dayplans with schools, or doing outreach to give lectures and object handling sessions at community centres or nursing homes. Normally (in big museums anyway, tiny local ones are another matter) there'll be different people covering different aspects/age ranges so maybe one person in charge of secondary school education, another for primary, another for family activities, and one for adult educaion.

I've been volunteering at the Oxford Museums for a few years now and I really enjoy it. Just crossing my fingers now that Leicester University will get back to me soon and accept me onto their Museum Studies masters course.


message 21: by Martha (new)

Martha (marthas48) | 857 comments Mod
Lots of good reading in your list.

Bleak House is wonderful! I read it last year and it's now one of my top 5 favorites. I'm trying Little Dorrit for the 2nd time. Determined to finish it this time, but unless it changes drastically it won't even make the top 10. LOL

Villette is good as well. Have you read a bio of the Brontes? It's interesting to see what was going on in their lives as they wrote their books. I will reread V sometime.

Gaskell's North & South is wonderful ... also in my top 5. :-) I just reread it.

I LOVE Gaiman! Have read both Neverwhere & The Graveyard Book. Both are great. Coraline is good, too. I'm hoping to read American Gods this year.


message 22: by Louise (new)

Louise Oooh, good luck wih Little Dorrit. If I enjoy the other Dickens I already have sitting on my shelf that one will definitely go on my to read list as well. Loved the BBC adaptation of it a few years back.

Haven't read a bio of the Bronte's no. I'm not very good at reading biographies. I probably should though and the Brontes are def pretty interesting. I saw a brilliant play about them a couple of years ago which blended a dramatisation of their actual lives with scenes from their books.

Reeeally looking forward to North and South. The TV adaptation is just one of my favourite things ever.

Gaiman...I love his ideas and his books always sound great, but I always have a really hard time feeling any emotional connection to either the characters or the story. So this is really me giving him one last shot because I feel he's somebody I should love. If I don't like Neverwhere/The Graveyard Book (whichever I end up reading) then I'll just quietly accept he's not for me and stop trying.


message 23: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 343 comments Mod
I didn't like The Graveyard Book which is the only Gaiman I have read. I feel the same about the lack of attatchment. Whilst reading I was thinking I know I am supposed to feel scared/excited/dreading but I just didn't. Not sure why, but will give Gaiman another try one day.

I haven't read or even attempted a single Biography in my life. I really do want to try one, so if anyone has recommendations (even one of the Brontes if it's good) I would be grateful.

Going to do some Dickens research and get more of his books on my shelf.


I sincerely hope Leicester reply with an offer! Fingers crossed for you. :)


message 24: by Martha (new)

Martha (marthas48) | 857 comments Mod
I read The Life of Charlotte Bronte, Volume 2 (both volumes ... didn't have a link to my ebook edition) by Elizabeth Gaskell. While it was very good, it's pretty long. Lots of Charlotte's letters were included. I understand they were good friends and Charlotte's father asked Gaskell to write this.

If you've never read a bio before, I'm not sure I'd recommend such a big one. LOL


message 25: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 343 comments Mod
I agree, start me off with an easy one! Will have to have a browse I guess.


message 26: by Martha (new)

Martha (marthas48) | 857 comments Mod
There's a new bio of the Brontes but I heard it's 1100 pages. Not ready for it yet. I did get a new understanding of Villette once I saw what she was going through while writing it. Very sad family.


message 27: by Nicolle (last edited Mar 15, 2013 05:09AM) (new)

Nicolle | 343 comments Mod
I'm reading The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society and it just so happens that they talk about the bio of the Brontes. They mention a drunken brother...


message 28: by Martha (new)

Martha (marthas48) | 857 comments Mod
Yes. Supposedly he held the most promise of the 4 siblings who survived to adulthood. Amazing considering the body of literature put out by those 3 sisters. We can only imagine what he could have accomplished without the alcohol.


message 29: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 343 comments Mod
Only imagine....

I can only imagine what I could do if I had a brain...


message 30: by Martha (new)

Martha (marthas48) | 857 comments Mod
Oh, now ... I know you definitely have a brain!! LOL

I do highly recommend reading a bio of the Brontes. I know you love the classics very much and this family contributed so much. It is a heartbreaking story though. I'd like to read a modern one ... just not up to 1100 pages right now. I think I'll look on audible.com ... maybe there's one I can listen to.


message 31: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 343 comments Mod
I'm going to research now...


message 32: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 343 comments Mod
http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Brontes-J...
has good reviews but like the ones you mention (could be this one?) it is LOOOONG.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bront%C3%ABs-...
is shorter but only one review, yet a five star one.


message 33: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 343 comments Mod
Might take a trip to my local bookshop, as they have loads on local things and I am reasonably close to Howarth.


message 34: by Martha (new)

Martha (marthas48) | 857 comments Mod
Oh, I'm so jealous!! Have you visited there?


message 35: by Martha (new)

Martha (marthas48) | 857 comments Mod
The first one was published in Nov. 2010, but could be the one that was mentioned to me as it's 1184 pages. Even with a paperback that's a pretty hefty book to try to hold. LOL

The 2nd one was published in 2008 and only has 304 pages.


message 36: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 343 comments Mod
Been to Howarth loads of times! It's such a beautiful place. I once went in the car and we were experiencing loads of rain in England at the time. To get to Howarth, it is mainly hilly countryside and I remember basically driving up a river at one point, and I thought the car was going to be washed away as it was only a little car. The water was up to the windows! I was screaming my head off!!!


message 37: by Martha (new)

Martha (marthas48) | 857 comments Mod
That is so dangerous! Glad you made it ok. If I ever get to England I plan to visit there ... hopefully in dry weather.


message 38: by Bev (last edited Mar 17, 2013 12:01PM) (new)

Bev (greenginger) | 137 comments Martha wrote: "That is so dangerous! Glad you made it ok. If I ever get to England I plan to visit there ... hopefully in dry weather."

I live in the next county along and to be honest there isnt a lot of dry weather!! Haha


message 39: by Louise (new)

Louise Yeah...England in general isn't the best place to go if you're after a nice warm sunny holiday!


message 40: by Martha (new)

Martha (marthas48) | 857 comments Mod
I'm from Louisiana originally ... lots of rain there, too. :-) Love the sound of rain on the roof ... and thunder, unless it's really close. Lightning struck my garage roof 2 years ago or so. I was in the room next to the garage. Scary!


message 41: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 343 comments Mod
The weather is a bit unpredictable these days too. It is spring and it snowed this morning. :0 I can't wait for summer, I just can't seem to remember what it is like to be warm! It's funny because a few weeks ago for one day it got reasonably warm as I went out without a coat (still had a jumper though) and I was so cheerful that it was going to get warm again. How wrong I was.


message 42: by Martha (new)

Martha (marthas48) | 857 comments Mod
Friday was sunny and warm here, but back to cold, windy and dreary ever since. We keep getting teasers! :-) I'm so ready to be complaining about how hot it is!!


message 43: by Carrie (new)

Carrie | 19 comments Nicolle wrote: "I didn't like The Graveyard Book which is the only Gaiman I have read. I feel the same about the lack of attatchment. Whilst reading I was thinking I know I am supposed to feel scared/excited/dread..."

One of my favorite biographies is John Adams by David McCullough. HBO made a fantastic miniseries based on this book.


message 44: by Carrie (new)

Carrie | 19 comments Nicolle wrote: "The weather is a bit unpredictable these days too. It is spring and it snowed this morning. :0 I can't wait for summer, I just can't seem to remember what it is like to be warm! It's funny because ..."

I'm with you. Here in PA, school was closed today because of a wintery mix. Fun! I can't wait for even some sun. :)


message 45: by Martha (new)

Martha (marthas48) | 857 comments Mod
Carrie wrote: "Nicolle wrote: "I didn't like The Graveyard Book which is the only Gaiman I have read. I feel the same about the lack of attatchment. Whilst reading I was thinking I know I am supposed to feel scar..."

That's one of my favorites, too, Carrie! McCullough is a great author.


message 46: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 343 comments Mod
Thanks for the recommendation, I am definitely going to give it a try.


message 47: by Louise (new)

Louise Nicolle wrote: "I sincerely hope Leicester reply with an offer! Fingers crossed for you. :) ."

Thanks! Finally heard back from them today and I got a place! Just have to wait for the ink and paper letter to reach me now before I can accept :D


message 48: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 343 comments Mod
How fantastic! I can imagine you hounding the postmen for the next couple of weeks! Well done. :)


message 49: by Louise (new)

Louise Oh, I will be. That and obsessively looking for furnished one bed flats in Leicester online (I think I've already found the one I want actually but I'm addicted to looking for them now). No way in hell am I doing halls again.


message 50: by Louise (new)

Louise And done with (read & reviewed) A Storm of Swords and The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There from my own list of 100 books - or 78...whatever, I'll get it up to 100 eventually.


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