Paul Scott

Paul Scott


Born
in Southgate, London, The United Kingdom
March 25, 1920

Died
March 01, 1978

Genre


Librarian Note: There is more than one author in the Goodreads database with this name. See this thread for more information.

Paul Scott was born in London in 1920. He served in the army from 1940 to 1946, mainly in India and Malaya. He is the author of thirteen distinguished novels including his famous The Raj Quartet. In 1977, Staying On won the Booker Prize. Paul Scott died in 1978.

Average rating: 4.16 · 12,375 ratings · 845 reviews · 85 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Jewel in the Crown (The...

4.16 avg rating — 4,502 ratings — published 1966 — 38 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Staying On

3.90 avg rating — 2,976 ratings — published 1977 — 26 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Day of the Scorpion

4.30 avg rating — 1,219 ratings — published 1968 — 32 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Towers of Silence

4.29 avg rating — 1,051 ratings — published 1971 — 24 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
A Division of the Spoils (T...

4.37 avg rating — 1,006 ratings — published 1975 — 23 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Raj Quartet

4.49 avg rating — 836 ratings — published 1976 — 11 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Raj Quartet (1): The Je...

4.38 avg rating — 240 ratings — published 1968 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Raj Quartet (2): The To...

4.57 avg rating — 99 ratings — published 1975 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Six Days in Marapore

3.66 avg rating — 70 ratings — published 1953 — 8 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Chinese Love Pavilion

3.44 avg rating — 43 ratings — published 1960 — 13 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Paul Scott…
The Jewel in the Crown The Day of the Scorpion The Towers of Silence A Division of the Spoils
(4 books)
by
4.26 avg rating — 8,953 ratings

“English is not spare. But it is beautiful. It cannot be called truthful because its subtleties are infinite. It is the language of a people who have probably earned their reputation for perfidy and hypocrisy because their language itself is so flexible, so often light-headed with statements which appear to mean one thing one year and quite a different thing the next.”
Paul Scott, The Jewel in the Crown

“Rumours began with the whispered gossip of native servants and spread quickly to the rest of the population.”
Paul Scott, The Jewel in the Crown

“The calendar was a mathematical progression with arbitrary surprises.”
Paul Scott, The Towers of Silence

Polls

More...