Statistics Quotes

Quotes tagged as "statistics" Showing 1-30 of 166
Benjamin Disraeli
“There are three types of lies -- lies, damn lies, and statistics.”
Benjamin Disraeli

Scott Dikkers
“Statistically speaking, there is a 65 percent chance that the love of your life is having an affair. Be very suspicious.”
Scott Dikkers, You Are Worthless: Depressing Nuggets of Wisdom Sure to Ruin Your Day

Joseph Stalin
“A single death is a tragedy; a million deaths is a statistic.”
Joseph Stalin

Mark Twain
“Facts are stubborn things, but statistics are pliable.”
Mark Twain

Banksy
“A recent survey or North American males found 42% were overweight, 34% were critically obese and 8% ate the survey.”
Banksy

Mark Haddon
“Most murders are committed by someone who is known to the victim. In fact, you are most likely to be murdered by a member of your own family on Christmas day.”
Mark Haddon, The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night Time

Richard P. Feynman
“I couldn't claim that I was smarter than sixty-five other guys--but the average of sixty-five other guys, certainly!”
Richard P. Feynman, Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!: Adventures of a Curious Character

Donald Rumsfeld
“Reports that say that something hasn't happened are always interesting to me, because as we know, there are known knowns; there are things we know we know. We also know there are known unknowns; that is to say we know there are some things we do not know. But there are also unknown unknowns- the ones we don't know we don't know.”
Donald Rumsfeld

“All the statistics in the world can't measure the warmth of a smile.”
Chris Hart

Criss Jami
“The logic behind patriotism is a mystery. At least a man who believes that his own family or clan is superior to all others is familiar with more than 0.000003% of the people involved.”
Criss Jami, Killosophy

Nenia Campbell
“All statistics have outliers.”
Nenia Campbell, Terrorscape

Ernest Rutherford
“If your experiment needs a statistician, you need a better experiment.”
Ernest Rutherford

E.M. Forster
“We are not concerned with the very poor. They are unthinkable, and only to be approached by the statistician or the poet.”
E.M. Forster

Ron DeLegge II
“99 percent of all statistics only tell 49 percent of the story.”
Ron DeLegge II, Gents with No Cents

James  Jones
“He could not believe that any of them might actually hit somebody. If one did, what a nowhere way to go: killed by accident; slain not as an individual but by sheer statistical probability, by the calculated chance of searching fire, even as he himself might be at any moment. Mathematics! Mathematics! Algebra! Geometry! When 1st and 3d Squads came diving and tumbling back over the tiny crest, Bell was content to throw himself prone, press his cheek to the earth, shut his eyes, and lie there. God, oh, God! Why am I here? Why am I here? After a moment's thought, he decided he better change it to: why are we here. That way, no agency of retribution could exact payment from him for being selfish.”
James Jones, The Thin Red Line

Leonard Mlodinow
“Another mistaken notion connected with the law of large numbers is the idea that an event is more or less likely to occur because it has or has not happened recently. The idea that the odds of an event with a fixed probability increase or decrease depending on recent occurrences of the event is called the gambler's fallacy. For example, if Kerrich landed, say, 44 heads in the first 100 tosses, the coin would not develop a bias towards the tails in order to catch up! That's what is at the root of such ideas as "her luck has run out" and "He is due." That does not happen. For what it's worth, a good streak doesn't jinx you, and a bad one, unfortunately , does not mean better luck is in store.”
Leonard Mlodinow, The Drunkard's Walk: How Randomness Rules Our Lives

“I guess I think of lotteries as a tax on the mathematically challenged.”
Roger Jones

Kató Lomb
“Whenever I read statistical reports, I try to imagine my unfortunate contemporary, the Average Person, who, according to these reports, has 0.66 children, 0.032 cars, and 0.046 TVs.”
Kato Lomb

Richelle E. Goodrich
“Statistics, likelihoods, and probabilities mean everything to men, nothing to God.”
Richelle E. Goodrich, Smile Anyway

Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz
“Nature has established patterns originating in the return of events, but only for the most part. New illnesses flood the human race, so that no matter how many experiments you have done on corpses, you have not thereby immposd a limit on the nature of events so that in the future they could not vary.”
Gottfried Leibniz

Henci Goer
“Of course, if 40% of women need oxytocin to progress normally, then something is wrong with the definition of normal.”
Henci Goer, Obstetric Myths Versus Research Realities: A Guide to the Medical Literature

Christopher Fowler
“Statistics show that the nature of English crime is reverting to its oldest habits. In a country where so many desire status and wealth, petty annoyances can spark disproportionately violent behaviour. We become frustrated because we feel powerless, invisible, unheard. We crave celebrity, but that’s not easy to come by, so we settle for notoriety. Envy and bitterness drive a new breed of lawbreakers, replacing the old motives of poverty and the need for escape. But how do you solve crimes which no longer have traditional motives?”
Christopher Fowler, Ten Second Staircase

“...when one considers that there are more than 750,000 police officers in the United States and that these officers have tens of millions of interactions with citizens each year, it is clear that police shootings are extremely rare events and that few officers--less than one-half of 1 percent each year--ever shoot anyone.”
David Klinger, Into the Kill Zone: A Cop's Eye View of Deadly Force

Charles P. Kindleberger
“This book is an essay in what is derogatorily called "literary economics," as opposed to mathematical economics, econometrics, or (embracing them both) the "new economic history." A man does what he can, and in the more elegant - one is tempted to say "fancier" - techniques I am, as one who received his formation in the 1930s, untutored. A colleague has offered to provide a mathematical model to decorate the work. It might be useful to some readers, but not to me. Catastrophe mathematics, dealing with such events as falling off a height, is a new branch of the discipline, I am told, which has yet to demonstrate its rigor or usefulness. I had better wait. Econometricians among my friends tell me that rare events such as panics cannot be dealt with by the normal techniques of regression, but have to be introduced exogenously as "dummy variables." The real choice open to me was whether to follow relatively simple statistical procedures, with an abundance of charts and tables, or not. In the event, I decided against it. For those who yearn for numbers, standard series on bank reserves, foreign trade, commodity prices, money supply, security prices, rate of interest, and the like are fairly readily available in the historical statistics.”
Charles P. Kindleberger, Manias, Panics, and Crashes: A History of Financial Crises

Charles Wheelan
“Regression analysis is the hydrogen bomb of the statistics arsenal.”
Charles Wheelan, Naked Statistics: Stripping the Dread from the Data

Steven Magee
“Many people that have been through the unemployment system realize that the corporate government unemployment statistics only report the short term unemployed and the long term unemployed and disabled are ignored.”
Steven Magee

Cathy O'Neil
“Sometimes the job of a data scientist is to know when you don't know enough.”
Cathy O'Neil, Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy

Daniel J. Levitin
“Just because someone quotes you a statistic or shows you a graph, it doesn’t mean it’s relevant to the point they’re trying to make. It’s the job of all of us to make sure we get the information that matters, and to ignore the information that doesn’t.”
Daniel J. Levitin, A Field Guide to Lies: Critical Thinking in the Information Age

Jasper Fforde
“You’ll also be pleased to know that no resident has been eaten in their sleep here for almost thirty-seven years.”
Jasper Fforde, Early Riser

Daniel J. Levitin
“Be wary, though, of the way news media use the word “significant,” because to statisticians it doesn’t mean “noteworthy.” In statistics, the word “significant” means that the results passed mathematical tests such as t-tests, chi-square tests, regression, and principal components analysis (there are hundreds). Statistical significance tests quantify how easily pure chance can explain the results. With a very large number of observations, even small differences that are trivial in magnitude can be beyond what our models of change and randomness can explain. These tests don’t know what’s noteworthy and what’s not—that’s a human judgment.”
Daniel J. Levitin, A Field Guide to Lies: Critical Thinking in the Information Age

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