Semiotics Quotes

Quotes tagged as "semiotics" Showing 1-30 of 38
Roger Zelazny
“No word matters. But man forgets reality and remembers words.”
Roger Zelazny, Lord of Light

Ludwig Wittgenstein
“Language disguises thought.”
Ludwig Wittgenstein, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus

Italo Calvino
“I had fallen in love. What I mean is: I had begun to recognize, to isolate the signs of one of those from the others, in fact I waited for these signs I had begun to recognize, I sought them, responded to those signs I awaited with other signs I made myself, or rather it was I who aroused them, these signs from her, which I answered with other signs of my own . . . ”
Italo Calvino, Cosmicomics

Erik Pevernagie
“Codes and semiotic conventions are a challenge for human communication, since they seal off people with a privacy protection label and make them accessible only by means of a barcode that might estrange them from their surroundings but, at the same time, procure them a kind of reassurance in their comfort zone. This dialectical situation may keep them struggling during their entire life. ("The unbreakable code " )”
Erik Pevernagie

Umberto Eco
“Semiotics is in principle the discipline studying everything which can be used in order to lie. If something cannot be used to tell a lie, conversely it cannot be used to tell the truth: it cannot in fact be used "to tell" at all.”
Umberto Eco, A Theory of Semiotics

Jeffrey Eugenides
“Reading a novel after reading semiotic theory was like jogging empty-handed after jogging with hand weights. What exquisite guilt she felt, wickedly enjoying narrative! Madeleine felt safe with a nineteenth century novel. There were going to be people in it. Something was going to happen to them in a place resembling the world. Then too there were lots of weddings in Wharton and Austen. There were all kinds of irresistible gloomy men.”
Jeffrey Eugenides, The Marriage Plot

Umberto Eco
“The good of a book lies in its being read. A book is made up of signs that speak of other signs, which in turn speak of things. Without an eye to read them, a book contains signs that produces no concept; therefore, it is dumb.”
Umberto Eco

William Saroyan
“One picture is worth a thousand words. Yes, but only if you look at the picture and say or think the thousand words”
William Saroyan

Ludwig Wittgenstein
“In this sort of predicament, always ask yourself: How did we learn the meaning of this word ("good", for instance)? From what sort of examples? In what language-games? Then it will be easier for you to see that the word must have a family of meanings.”
Ludwig Wittgenstein, Philosophical Investigations

“The transference of culture in time can, in large measure, be described as the conservation of sign systems serving as a control on behavior.”
Doris Bradbury

Philip Pullman
“Everything means something," Lyra said severely. "We just have to find out how to read it.”
Philip Pullman, Lyra's Oxford

“natural language will always remain the basic interpretation of, and reservoir for, the development of the artificial formalized languages of science.”
Doris Bradbury

Adam Weishaupt
“Nothing is more important than who controls the signs. To change the world, it is necessary to change the signs that are used to condition people.”
Adam Weishaupt, Hypersex

Philippe Sollers
“Derrida s’intéressait moins au roman qu’à l’écriture, et ce qui l’a fasciné c’est le fait que j’ai fait de l’écriture un roman.”
Philippe Sollers

Philippe Sollers
“Barthes me lisait, donc on s’est rencontrés.”
Philippe Sollers

Ursula K. Le Guin
“He mentally perceived words as having various sizes, densities, depths; words were dark stars, some small and dull and solid, some immense, complex, subtle, with a powerful gravity-field that attracted infinite meanings to them. Freedom was the biggest of the dark stars.”
Ursula K. Le Guin, The Birthday of the World and Other Stories

Don DeLillo
“I tell myself I have reached an age, the age of unreliable menace. The world is full of abandoned meanings. In the commonplace I find unexpected themes and intensities.”
Don DeLillo, White Noise

Noah  Wareness
“The universal logo for a pizzahut is eight slices painted cross a disc of yellow plywood mounted in the mouth of a taxidermic hippopotapus.”
Noah Wareness

Roland Barthes
“In this manner , we are told, the system of the imaginary is spread circularly, by detours and returns the length of an empty subject.”
Roland Barthes, Empire of Signs

Jeffrey Eugenides
“Semiotiek 211 was een specialistisch vak dat werd gedoceerd door een voormalige rebel van het instituut Engelse taal- en letterkunde. Michael Zipperstein was tweeëndertig jaar geleden als aanhanger van het New Criticism naar Brown gekomen. Hij had drie generaties studenten de gewoonte bijgebracht teksten zorgvuldig te lezen, te analyseren en te interpreteren zonder aandacht voor de biografie van de auteur, totdat hij in 1975 tijdens een sabbatical in Parijs een levensveranderende openbaring kreeg: tijdens een diner maakte hij kennis met Roland Barthes en bij de cassoulet werd hij tot het nieuwe geloof bekeerd. [...] Hij bedolf zijn studenten onder de leeslijsten: naast de grote semiotische kanonnen - Derrida, Eco, Barthes - moesten ze zich voor Semiotiek 211 door hele stapels achtergrondteksten heen worstelen, van Sarrasine van Balzac tot bundels van Semiotext(e) tot gefotokopieerde capita selecta van E.M. Cioran, Robert Walser, Claude Lévi-Strauss, Peter Handke en Carl van Vechten. [...] Door dat esoterische onderzoek, en door Zippersteins kale goeroehoofd en witte baard, kregen zijn studenten het gevoel dat ze geestelijk waren doorgelicht en nu - althans twee uur lang op dinsdagmiddag - deel uitmaakten van een literaire elite.”
Eugenides, Jeffrey

Jeffrey Eugenides
“In de geldbeluste jaren tachtig was studeren niet erg radicaal. Semiotiek was het eerste vak dat een beetje naar revolutie rook. Daar werd een grens getrokken: het was subtiel en Europees, het ging over prikkelende onderwerpen, over foltering, sadisme, hermafroditisme - over seks en macht. Madeleine was op school altijd populair geweest. Door die jarenlange populariteit kon ze snel en onfeilbaar cool van uncool onderscheiden, zelfs binnen een subgroep als het vak Engelse taal- en letterkunde, waar het begrip cool niet leek te bestaan.”
Eugenides, Jeffrey

Umberto Eco
“The good of a book lies in its being read. A book is made up of signs that speak of other signs, which in their turn speak of things. Without an eye to read them, a book contains signs that produce no concepts; therefore it is dumb.”
Umberto Eco, The Name of the Rose

Roland Barthes
“(A squeeze of the hand—enormous documentation—a tiny gesture within the palm, a knee which doesn't move away, an arm extended, as if quite naturally, along the back of a sofa and against which the other's head gradually comes to rest—this is the paradisiac realm of subtle and clandestine signs: a kind of festival not of the senses but of meaning.)”
Roland Barthes, A Lover's Discourse: Fragments

Jean Baudrillard
“There is no longer any difference between the economic and the political, because the same language reigns in both, from one end to the other; a society therefore where the political economy, literally speaking, is finally fully realized.”
Jean Baudrillard, Simulacra and Simulation

L.E.J. Brouwer
“(...), dat alle woorduitingen meer of minder ontwikkelde verbale imperatieven zijn, dat dus toespreken altijd neerkomt op bevelen of bedreigen, en begrijpen op gehoorzamen; (...)”
L.E.J. Brouwer

“…semiotic interpretations are not intended to answer the question of what forms mean. That might be a problem of iconology, or iconography, or psychology, or – of course – criticism. The issue which semiotics must address is not what forms mean, but rather how they mean the various things they mean the various things they do. In other terms, semiotics must study the expressive systems operating in each case: which traits of the form convey meaning, to which other traits they are opposed, how the relation between form and meaning originated, how meanings change, how interpretation is achieved, and so on.”
Bonta

“One does not speak about history but the present, semiotics of systems with production in not only one but the system of movements. System of paradigms of the past, or systems of paradigms, and the system and systems of future paradigms, in positive theory of art.”
Vladan Kuzmanovic

Paul Auster
“...isn’t it intriguing that thought cannot exist without language, and since language is a function of the brain, we would have to say that language---the ability to experience the world through symbols---is in some sense a physical property of human beings, which proves that the old mind-body duality is so much nonsense, doesn’t it? Adieu, Descartes. The mind and body are one.”
Paul Auster, Invisible

Roland Barthes
“True wrestling, wrong called amateur wrestling, is performed in second-rate halls, where the public spontaneously attunes itself to the spectacular nature of the contest, like the audience at a suburban cinema.”
Roland Barthes, Mythologies

Roland Barthes
“This is why myth is experienced as innocent speech: not because its intentions are hidden—if they were hidden, they could not be efficacious—but because they are naturalised.”
Roland Barthes

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