Scholars Quotes

Quotes tagged as "scholars" Showing 1-30 of 95
Albert Camus
“An intellectual? Yes. And never deny it. An intellectual is someone whose mind watches itself. I like this, because I am happy to be both halves, the watcher and the watched. "Can they be brought together?" This is a practical question. We must get down to it. "I despise intelligence" really means: "I cannot bear my doubts.”
Albert Camus

Albert Camus
“It is the job of thinking people not to be on the side of the executioners.”
Albert Camus, Neither Victims Nor Executioners

Susan Sontag
“Interpretation is the revenge of the intellectual upon art. ”
Susan Sontag

Werner Herzog
“Academia is the death of cinema. It is the very opposite of passion. Film is not the art of scholars, but of illiterates.”
Werner Herzog

Shannon L. Alder
“The most intriguing people you will encounter in this life are the people who had insights about you, that you didn't know about yourself.”
Shannon L. Alder

Friedrich Nietzsche
“They're so cold, these scholars!
May lightning strike their food
so that their mouths learn how
to eat fire!”
Friedrich Nietzsche

Dorothy L. Sayers
“The only ethical principle which has made science possible is that the truth shall be told all the time. If we do not penalize false statements made in error, we open up the way for false statements by intention. And a false statement of fact, made deliberately, is the most serious crime a scientist can commit.”
Dorothy L. Sayers, Gaudy Night

Dan Rather
“An intellectual snob is someone who can listen to the William Tell Overture and not think of The Lone Ranger. ”
Dan Rather

Dorothy L. Sayers
“To make a deliberate falsification for personal gain is the last, worst depth to which either scholar or artist can descend in work or life.

(Letter to Muriel St. Clare Byrne, 8 September 1935)”
Dorothy L Sayers, The Letters of Dorothy L. Sayers 1899-1936: The Making of a Detective Novelist

Santiago Ramón y Cajal
“Heroes and scholars represent the opposite extremes... The scholar struggles for the benefit of all humanity, sometimes to reduce physical effort, sometimes to reduce pain, and sometimes to postpone death, or at least render it more bearable. In contrast, the patriot sacrifices a rather substantial part of humanity for the sake of his own prestige. His statue is always erected on a pedestal of ruins and corpses... In contrast, all humanity crowns a scholar, love forms the pedestal of his statues, and his triumphs defy the desecration of time and the judgment of history.”
Santiago Ramón y Cajal, Advice for a Young Investigator

George Orwell
“Many people genuinely do not wish to be saints, and it is possible that some who achieve or aspire to sainthood have never had much temptation to be human beings.”
George Orwell

Alexandre Dumas
“You scholars, you're in communication with the devil.”
Alexandre Dumas, The Black Tulip

W.B. Yeats
The Scholars
"Bald heads forgetful of their sins,
Old, learned, respectable bald heads
Edit and annotate the lines
That young men, tossing on their beds,
Rhymed out in love’s despair
To flatter beauty’s ignorant ear.

They’ll cough in the ink to the world’s end;
Wear out the carpet with their shoes
Earning respect; have no strange friend;
If they have sinned nobody knows.
Lord, what would they say
Should their Catullus walk that way?”
W.B. Yeats, The Wild Swans At Coole

Du Fu
“Could I get mansions covering ten thousand miles, I'd house all the poor scholars and make them beam with smiles”
Fu Du

Orson Scott Card
“Scholars don't have blood flowing in their veins," said Hamlet. "When they're wounded, they bleed logic, and when all of it is gone, their brains die, and they become ... soldiers.”
Orson Scott Card, The Ghost Quartet

Santosh Kalwar
“Every country has a cultural legacy and religious practices for reasons that I don’t believe fall under the category of superstition, something that a religious scholar should understand.”
Santosh Kalwar

Richard Fletcher
“It is a wholly deplorable state of affairs when specialists in any discipline talk only to each other, and accordingly I have sought to write a book which will communicate some of the fruits of research in a manner which will make them accessible to all.”
Richard Fletcher, The Barbarian Conversion: From Paganism to Christianity

Albert Camus
“It's always useless to try to cut oneself off, even from other people's cruelty and stupidity. You can't say: "I don't know about it." One either fights or collaborates. There is nothing less excusable than war, and the appeal to national hatreds. But once war has come, it is both cowardly and useless to try to stand on one side under the pretext that one is not responsible. Ivory towers are down. Indulgence is forbidden—for oneself as well as for other people. It is both impossible and immoral to judge an event from outside. One keeps the right to hold this absurd misfortune in contempt only by remaining inside it. One individual's reaction has no intrinsic importance. It can be of some use, but I can justify nothing. Dilettante's dream of being free to hover above his time is the most ridiculous form of liberty. This is why I must try to serve. And, if they don't want me, I must also accept the position of the "despised civilian." In both cases, I am absolutely free to judge things and to feel as disgusted with them as I like. In both cases, I am in the midst of the war and have the right to judge it. To judge it and to act”
Albert Camus, Notebooks 1935-1942

“No one who cannot rejoice in the discovery of his own mistakes deserves to be called a scholar.”
Donald Foster

Albert Camus
“You would not write about loneliness so much if you knew how to get the most out of it”
Albert Camus, Notebooks 1935-1942

Albert Camus
“To abolish hope is to bring the thought back to the body. And the body is doomed to perish.”
Albert Camus, Notebooks 1935-1942

Albert Camus
“Tragedy forms a closed world, in which we stumble over and knock against obstacles. In the theater, tragedy must be born and die in the restricted area of the stage”
Albert Camus, Notebooks 1935-1942

Albert Camus
“We used to wonder where war lived, what it was that made it so vile. And now we realize that we know where it lives, that it is inside ourselves. For most people, it's the embarrassment, the need to make a choice, the choice which makes them go but feel remorse for not having been brave enough to stay home, or which makes them stay at home but regret that they can't share the way others are going to die.”
Albert Camus, Notebooks 1935-1942

Albert Camus
“It is always useless to try to cut oneself off, even from other people's cruelty and stupidity. You can't say: "I don't know about it." One either fights or collaborates. There is nothing less excusable than war, and the appeal to national hatreds. But once war has come, it is both cowardly and useless to try to stand on one side under the pretext that one is not responsible. Ivory towers are down. Indulgence is forbidden—for oneself as well as for another people. It is both impossible and immoral to judge an event from outside. One keeps the right to hold this absurd misfortune in contempt only by remaining inside it. One individual's reaction has no intrinsic importance. It can be of some use, but I can justify nothing. Dilettante's dream of being free to hover above his time is the most ridiculous form of liberty. This is why I must try to serve. And, if they don't want me, I must also accept the position of the "despised civilian." In both cases, I am absolutely free to judge things and to feel as disgusted with them as I like. In both cases, I am in the midst of the war and have the right to judge it. To judge it and to act.”
Albert Camus

Albert Camus
“A time comes when one can no longer feel the emotion of love. The only thing left is tragedy. Living for someone or for something no longer has any meaning. Nothing seems to keep its meaning except the idea of dying for something.”
Albert Camus, Notebooks 1935-1942

Laurence Galian
“The identity of Shaitan of the Islamic tradition is crucial. By the time Muhammad (Peace be upon him) was reciting the Qur'an, they were calling Shaitan 'the Old Serpent (Dragon)' and 'Lord of the Abyss.' The Old Serpent or Old Dragon is, according to experts such as E.A. Budge and S.N. Kramer, Leviathan. Leviathan is Lotan. Lotan traces to Tietan. Tietan, the authorities in Near Eastern mythology tell us, is a later form of Tiamat. According to the experts, the Dragon of the Abyss called Shaitan is the same Dragon of the Abyss named Tiamat. Scholars specializing in Near Eastern mythology have stated this repeatedly.”
Laurence Galian, The Sun At Midnight: The Revealed Mysteries Of The Ahlul Bayt Sufis

Laurence Galian
“Academic and scholarly study are absolutely necessary for our continued understanding of ourselves and the world in which we live. However, a sense of inhumanity has begun to creep over science and academia, a kind of bureaucracy that chokes almost all possibility of real discovery from ever happening, and even worse, a belief system that very meticulously and deliberately attacks spirituality, religion and consciousness in every way possible. Materialist science reduces everything to matter. The human being, in the opinion of the materialist scientist, is nothing more than meat.”
Laurence Galian, Alien Parasites: 40 Gnostic Truths to Defeat the Archon Invasion!

Germany Kent
“Virtual learning is not all bad. It is a window of opportunity to engage more users with technology. The digital space allows educators to be innovative and curate content, and teaches young scholars and future leaders the importance of being involved in the process of digital citizenship.”
Germany Kent

“In your future, cultivate productively the bits that you do know; and try to
understand what others do before dismissing them or criticizing them. The world
is a big place with room for many truths, but is too small I think for error, for
unsupported argument, and for attempts to make everyone see and do the same
thing the same way. We just do not know enough.”
Peter Shillingsburg

Friedrich Nietzsche
“I take as a parable traffic with books. The scholar, who really does nothing but ‘trundle’ books − the philologist at a modest assessment about 200 a day − finally loses altogether the ability to think for himself. If he does not trundle he does not think. He replies to a stimulus (− a thought he has read) when he thinks − finally he does nothing but react. The scholar expends his entire strength in affirmation and denial, in criticizing what has already been thought − he himself no longer thinks…”
Friedrich Nietzsche

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