Regency Quotes

Quotes tagged as "regency" Showing 1-30 of 103
Tessa Dare
“He kissed her. Without warning, without permission. Without even deciding to do it, but simply because he couldn't have done anything else. He needed that breath she was holding. It belonged to him, and he wanted it back.”
Tessa Dare, One Dance with a Duke

Julia Quinn
“Sometimes Hen...I think I would give my life just for one of your smiles.”
Julia Quinn, Minx

Julianne Donaldson
“You are brave and loyal and true. You have such a good heart." He held my hand close to his chest and covered it with his other hand. "It is only afraid. But I would take such good care of it, love, if you would give it to me.”
Julianne Donaldson, Blackmoore

Vicky Dreiling
“You are my one and only, for all eternity.”
Vicky Dreiling, How to Marry a Duke

Georgette Heyer
“Your fate is writ clear;you will be murdered. I cannot conceive how it comes about that you were not murdered long since!"
"How odd!Charles himself once said that to me, or something like it!"
"There is nothing odd in it; any sensible man must say it!”
Georgette Heyer, The Grand Sophy

Georgette Heyer
“How the deuce would you know the right way to go on if you was never taught anything but the wrong way?”
Georgette Heyer, Cotillion

Georgette Heyer
“Yes, love," responded his sister cheerfully, "but it wasn't of the least consequence, and in any event I answered for you. You would be astonished, I daresay, if you knew what interesting conversations I enjoy with myself.”
Georgette Heyer, Venetia

William Congreve
“I came up stairs into the world, for I was born in a cellar.”
William Congreve

“If you have always suspected your sister of an inclination to madness, it will be my pleasure to confirm your worst fears.”
Mary Balogh, The Temporary Wife / A Promise of Spring

Julia Justiss
“Oh, my dear, love isn't always the coup de foudre--the lightning strike. Sometimes it happens quietly, so quietly you may not even notice.”
Julia Justiss, Convenient Proposal to the Lady

Jane Austen
“But above all, above respect and esteem, there was a motive within her of good will which could not be overlooked. It was gratitude. -- Gratitude, not merely for having once loved her, but for loving her still well enough, to forgive all the petulance and acrimony of her manner in rejecting him, and all the unjust accusations accompanying her rejection. He who, she had been persuaded, would avoid her as his greatest enemy, seemed, on this accidental meeting, most eager to preserve the acquaintance, and without any indelicate display of regard, or any peculiarity of manner, where their two selves only were concerned, was soliciting the good opinion of her friends, and bent on making her known to his sister.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Georgette Heyer
“He was silent. Well! Now she knew how right she had been. He was not in the least in love with her, and very happy she was to know it, All she wanted was a suitable retreat, such as a lumber-room, or a coal-cellar, in which to enjoy her happiness to the full.”
Georgette Heyer, Sylvester

Georgette Heyer
“In all of this she was only partially successful, for although Nurse knew that once Miss Venetia had made up her mind she was powerless to prevent her doing whatever she liked, and was obliged to admit some faint resemblance in Damerel to the Good Samaritan, she persisted in referring to him as The Ungodly, and in ascribing his charitable behaviour to some obscure but evil motive.”
Georgette Heyer, Venetia

Georgette Heyer
“The end of the idyll was implicit in the beginning: I at least knew that, though you might not. And also that the more enchanted the idyll the greater must be the pain of its ending. That won’t endure. Hearts don’t really break, you know.”
Georgette Heyer, Venetia

Caroline George
“The night was bright. He was seen.
And she was everything.”
Caroline George, Dearest Josephine

Georgette Heyer
“Bustle about Noddy, or we shant be in time to snabble any of the lobster patties.”
Georgette Heyer, Frederica

Georgette Heyer
“Entertaining females with accounts of jug-bitten maunderings is one of my favourite pastimes.”
Georgette Heyer, Black Sheep

Georgette Heyer
“[Sir Nugent] wore so many rings on his fingers, and so many fobs and seals dangling at his waist, that he might have been taken for a jeweller advertising his wares.”
Georgette Heyer, Sylvester

Caroline George
“Live always with the wind against your cheeks and buds of gorse tucked into your hair. Live always, and never forget where you belong.”
Caroline George, Dearest Josephine

Noorilhuda
“For all the largesse of my mind’s colony where a vividly enflamed man would take off each of the precious stones and melt away the cast, his success ultimately lay in being nice to me, being nice to himself irrespective of the behavior of each; of being proud of me and of himself irrespective of worldly success; holding me in regard with an almost primitive sense of courage, irrespective of the purity of my body or spirit.”
Noorilhuda, The Governess

Georgette Heyer
“In a nobler age one could have answered such impertinence by jostling his lordship as he stood holding open the door, so that he would have been obliged to demand a meeting. Or did one, even in that age, refrain from jostling people in doorways when a lady was present?”
Georgette Heyer, Venetia

“Even Quinn joined in and took his turn picking obscure items, like a feather cloak that originated in far-off New Zealand.”
Alice Wallis-Eton, The Cryptographer

Georgette Heyer
“Their eyes met, both pairs grey, hers very cool and clear, his faintly smiling...”
Georgette Heyer, The Nonesuch

M.C. Beaton
“Lady Stanton? No one, least of me, plays attention to the remarks of the vulgar.”
M.C. Beaton, Lady Fortescue Steps Out

Christy English
“The warm sun caught in the green of the leaves overhead, setting dappled shadow to dance across her face as Pembroke held her in his arms. He waltzed with her over the uneven ground as if tree roots and broken leaves did not exist, as if they were alone in a world of their own making.

He stopped suddenly but did not let her go. He held her close so that she could feel the heat of his body against hers and the beat of his heart.

"I had better stop," he said. "There are no Almack's ladies to keep me on my best behavior here."

"I find I like your roguish ways, Raymond. Feel free to practice them on me anytime you wish.”
Christy English, Love on a Midsummer Night

Caroline George
“Love was not based on whether the right girl ended up with the right boy. Love just was—was there in one’s chest, stubborn and certain. But sometimes the right girl did end up with the right boy. Sometimes their love won.”
Caroline George, Dearest Josephine

Caroline George
“A woman of little propriety may not receive the public’s respect, but she will gain their attendance.”
Caroline George, Dearest Josephine

Julie Klassen
“He realized it was the first of January, the day many people began the new year with a thorough cleaning. A time for "Out with the old, in with the new."
Could Richard do the same to his heart, his ways? He hoped so, God in heaven, give me strength. Help me become a better man.”
Julie Klassen, A Castaway in Cornwall

Esther Hatch
“I'm so tired. I'm so tired all the time." Her words were coming in small gasps. "I think I could do everything better if I weren't so tired”
Esther Hatch, A Proper Charade

Jane Austen
“I do not cough for my own amusement," replied Kitty fretfully.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

« previous 1 3 4