Elizabeth Bennet Quotes

Quotes tagged as "elizabeth-bennet" Showing 1-30 of 46
Jane Austen
“There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of merit or sense.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others. My courage always rises at every attempt to intimidate me.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“I could easily forgive his pride, if he had not mortified mine.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“You must learn some of my philosophy. Think only of the past as its remembrance gives you pleasure.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“I am excessively diverted.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies do divert me, I own, and I laugh at them whenever I can.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“She was convinced that she could have been happy with him, when it was no longer likely they should meet.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“She began now to comprehend that he was exactly the man who, in disposition and talents, would most suit her. His understanding and temper, though unlike her own, would have answered all her wishes. It was an union that must have been to the advantage of both: by her ease and liveliness, his mind might have been softened, his manners improved; and from his judgement, information, and knowledge of the world, she must have received benefit of greater importance.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“They parted at last with mutual civility, and possibly a mutual desire of never meeting again.”
Jane Austen

Jane Austen
“It is amazing to me," said Bingley, "How young ladies can have patience to be so very accomplished as they all are."
"All young ladies accomplished? My dear Charles, what do you mean?"
"Yes, all of them, I think. They all paint tables, cover screens and net purses. I scarcely know any one who cannot do all this, and I am sure I never heard a young lady spoken of for the first time without being informed that she was very accomplished."
"Your list of the common extent of accomplishments," said Darcy, "has too much truth. The word is applied to many a woman who deserves it no otherwise than by netting a purse or covering a screen. But I am very far from agreeing with you in your estimation of ladies in general. I cannot boast of knowing more than half a dozen, in the whole range of my acquaintance, that are really accomplished."
"Nor I, I am sure." said Miss Bingley.
"Then," observed Elizabeth, "you must comprehend a great deal in your idea of an accomplished woman."
"Yes, I do comprehend a great deal in it."
"Oh! certainly," cried his faithful assistant, "no one can really be esteemed accomplished who does not greatly surpass knowledge of music, singing, drawing, dancing, and the modern languages, to deserve the word; and besides all this, she must possess a certain something in her air and manner of walking, the tone of her voice, her address and expressions, or the word will be but half deserved."
"All this she must possess," added Darcy, "and to all this she must yet add something more substantial, in the improvement of her mind by extensive reading."
"I am no longer surprised at your knowing only six accomplished women. I rather wonder at your knowing any.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Vanity, not love, has been my folly.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“It's a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“My object then," replied Darcy, "was to show you, by every civility in my power, that I was not so mean as to resent the past; and I hoped to obtain your forgiveness, to lessen your ill opinion, by letting you see that your reproofs had been attended to. How soon any other wishes introduced themselves I can hardly tell, but I believe in about half an hour after I had seen you.”
jane austen

Jane Austen
“Have you any other objection than your belief of my indifference?”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Seth Grahame-Smith
“Never had she so honestly felt that she could have loved him, as now, when all love must be vain.”
Seth Grahame-Smith, Pride and Prejudice and Zombies

Jane Austen
“You may ask questions which I shall not choose to answer.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

P.D. James
“It is always easy to question the judgement of others in matters of which we may be imperfectly informed.”
P. D. James

Jane Austen
“It was gratitude; gratitude, not merely for having once loved her, but for loving her still well enough to forgive all the petulance and acrimony of her manner in rejecting him, and all the unjust accusations accompanying her rejection.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“But above all, above respect and esteem, there was a motive within her of good will which could not be overlooked. It was gratitude. -- Gratitude, not merely for having once loved her, but for loving her still well enough, to forgive all the petulance and acrimony of her manner in rejecting him, and all the unjust accusations accompanying her rejection. He who, she had been persuaded, would avoid her as his greatest enemy, seemed, on this accidental meeting, most eager to preserve the acquaintance, and without any indelicate display of regard, or any peculiarity of manner, where their two selves only were concerned, was soliciting the good opinion of her friends, and bent on making her known to his sister.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

“As for Elizabeth Bennet, our chief reason for accepting her point of view as a reflection of her author's is the impression that she bears of sympathy between them--an impression of which almost every reader would be sensible, even if it had not the explicit confirmation of Jane Austen's letters. Yet, as she is presented to us in Pride and Prejudice, she is but a partial and sometimes perverse observer. ”
Mary Lascelles, Jane Austen And Her Art

Jane Austen
“One has got all the goodness, and the other all the appearance of it”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“My dear, dear aunt,' she rapturously cried, what delight! what felicity! You give me fresh life and vigour. Adieu to disappointment and spleen. What are men to rocks and mountains? Oh! what hours of transport we shall spend! And when we do return, it shall not be like other travellers, without being able to give one accurate idea of any thing. We will know where we have gone -- we will recollect what we have seen. Lakes, mountains, and rivers shall not be jumbled together in our imaginations; nor, when we attempt to describe any particular scene, will we begin quarrelling about its relative situation. Let our first effusions be less insupportable than those of the generality of travellers.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Mirta Ines Trupp
“We are connected, Elizabeth. Of that there can be no doubt. It is something akin to your love of nature, of soil and roots and water and sunlight. Your seedlings could not thrive without one of these components…as I could not thrive without you.”
Mirta Ines Trupp

Jann Rowland
“In Darcy, Elizabeth would have a husband who would adore her, but who was stubborn enough to refuse to give in to her. Elizabeth would have a husband she respected and loved, if she could ever bend her stiff neck enough to confess to it. Bennet could not have wished for anything more for his daughter.”
Jann Rowland, Coincidence

Abigail Reynolds
“But I am supposed to travel to the Lakes with my aunt and uncle in June!"
Lady Matlock beamed. "All the better! They can collect you at Matlock Park. It is just off the North Road, and we would be delighted if they would break their journey with us."
This was beginning to feel like a kidnapping.”
Abigail Reynolds, Mr. Darcy's Journey: A Pride & Prejudice Variation

Lucy Worsley
“Lizzy Bennet, charming as we find her today, was strikingly bold, almost brash, for her time. When she eventually appeared in print, many Georgian readers would consider her to be offensively uppity.”
Lucy Worsley, Jane Austen at Home

“Elizabeth is the most wonderful person I have ever met! And you think so too! Do not you try to deny it; I see the way you look at her!

Said by Georgiana to Mr. Darcy”
Jeanna Ellsworth, Mr. Darcy's Promise

“Elizabeth could not believe what she was hearing. Mr. Darcy and Mr. Wickham were having a verbal duel right there in her sitting room!”
Jeanna Ellsworth, Mr. Darcy's Promise

Jane Austen
“The more I see of the world, the more I am dissatisfied with it;
- Elizabeth Bennet (Volume 2, chapter 1)”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Son muy pocas las personas a las que quiero de verdad, y de pocos tengo buen concepto. Cuanto más conozco el mundo, menos me gusta; y cada día estoy más convencida de la inconstancia del carácter humano, y de lo poco fiable que es la apariencia de valía o de buen juicio".”
Jane Austen, Pride & Prejudice

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