Quotes About Elizabeth Bennet

Quotes tagged as "elizabeth-bennet" (showing 1-30 of 36)
Jane Austen
“There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of merit or sense.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others. My courage always rises at every attempt to intimidate me.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“I could easily forgive his pride, if he had not mortified mine.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“You must learn some of my philosophy. Think only of the past as its remembrance gives you pleasure.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“I am excessively diverted. ”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies do divert me, I own, and I laugh at them whenever I can.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“She was convinced that she could have been happy with him, when it was no longer likely they should meet.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“She began now to comprehend that he was exactly the man who, in disposition and talents, would most suit her. His understanding and temper, though unlike her own, would have answered all her wishes. It was an union that must have been to the advantage of both: by her ease and liveliness, his mind might have been softened, his manners improved; and from his judgement, information, and knowledge of the world, she must have received benefit of greater importance.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“They parted at last with mutual civility, and possibly a mutual desire of never meeting again.”
Jane Austen

Jane Austen
“Vanity, not love, has been my folly.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“My object then," replied Darcy, "was to show you, by every civility in my power, that I was not so mean as to resent the past; and I hoped to obtain your forgiveness, to lessen your ill opinion, by letting you see that your reproofs had been attended to. How soon any other wishes introduced themselves I can hardly tell, but I believe in about half an hour after I had seen you.”
Jane Austen

Jane Austen
“It's a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Seth Grahame-Smith
“Never had she so honestly felt that she could have loved him, as now, when all love must be vain.”
Seth Grahame-Smith, Pride and Prejudice and Zombies

P.D. James
“It is always easy to question the judgement of others in matters of which we may be imperfectly informed.”
P.D. James

Jane Austen
“You may ask questions which I shall not choose to answer.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

“When left alone with her, I ignored her and kept my eyes on my book, though I confess I turned over more pages than I read.”
Mary Street, The Confession of Fitzwilliam Darcy

Jane Austen
“It was gratitude; gratitude, not merely for having once loved her, but for loving her still well enough to forgive all the petulance and acrimony of her manner in rejecting him, and all the unjust accusations accompanying her rejection.”
Jane Austen

“As for Elizabeth Bennet, our chief reason for accepting her point of view as a reflection of her author's is the impression that she bears of sympathy between them--an impression of which almost every reader would be sensible, even if it had not the explicit confirmation of Jane Austen's letters. Yet, as she is presented to us in Pride and Prejudice, she is but a partial and sometimes perverse observer. ”
Mary Lascelles, Jane Austen And Her Art

“Elizabeth’s tears had wrung my heart: I longed to enfold her in my arms, to comfort her, but I knew
it would be infamous indeed to take such advantage of her distress.”
Mary Street, The Confession of Fitzwilliam Darcy

Abigail Reynolds
“When a gentleman spends quite some time telling me in detail about his father's courtship of his mother, I have to assume there is some moral for me in the tale. Since in this case that courtship consisted primarily of his father insisting repeatedly they were to marry and his mother refusing him almost as often, I take the moral to be that there is very little point in refusing, since it would only lead to the question being repeated until I agreed to it out of sheer exhaustion.”
Abigail Reynolds, The Darcys of Derbyshire: A Pride & Prejudice Variation

“Elizabeth was not playing for the sake of exhibiting her virtuosity: she played for joy.”
Mary Street, The Confession of Fitzwilliam Darcy

KaraLynne Mackrory
“Elizabeth laughed and pushed her father's shoulder. "Go, Papa, and be kind to him. I love him so. And it would be to your advantage to be on his good side."
Mr. Bennet raised his eyebrows. "Oh, and why is that?"
Because I have seen both his libraries in London and at Pemberley, Papa."
Interested and amused, Mr. Bennet said, "Ahh, and are they very grand, Lizzy?"
A more exquisite sight you will not see," she assured him.”
KaraLynne Mackrory, Bluebells in the Mourning

“So what do you think, Miss Bennet? Will you come to Pemberley?" He Spoke quietly over her shoulder; she hadn't realized he was so close. Feeling a mischievous impulse, likely from her nervousness at his proximity, she said the first thing that came to her mind.
"It is tolerable, I suppose, but not hadsome enough to tempt me."
Mr. Darcy's face went from shocked and angry, to hurt and confused, and finally to understanding as her words sunk in.”
Elizabeth Adams, The Houseguest: A Pride and Prejudice Vagary

Jane Austen
“One has got all the goodness, and the other all the appearance of it”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“My dear, dear aunt,' she rapturously cried, what delight! what felicity! You give me fresh life and vigour. Adieu to disappointment and spleen. What are men to rocks and mountains? Oh! what hours of transport we shall spend! And when we do return, it shall not be like other travellers, without being able to give one accurate idea of any thing. We will know where we have gone -- we will recollect what we have seen. Lakes, mountains, and rivers shall not be jumbled together in our imaginations; nor, when we attempt to describe any particular scene, will we begin quarrelling about its relative situation. Let our first effusions be less insupportable than those of the generality of travellers.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“But above all, above respect and esteem, there was a motive within her of good will which could not be overlooked. It was gratitude. -- Gratitude, not merely for having once loved her, but for loving her still well enough, to forgive all the petulance and acrimony of her manner in rejecting him, and all the unjust accusations accompanying her rejection. He who, she had been persuaded, would avoid her as his greatest enemy, seemed, on this accidental meeting, most eager to preserve the acquaintance, and without any indelicate display of regard, or any peculiarity of manner, where their two selves only were concerned, was soliciting the good opinion of her friends, and bent on making her known to his sister.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Aunque me dieras cuarenta hombres como él, nunca sería tan feliz como tú. Mientras no posea tu buen carácter, tu bondad, no podrá embargarme esa dicha. No, no, déjame a mi aire; y, tal vez, si me acompaña la suerte, con el tiempo pueda encontrar a otro señor Collins.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

“I hardened my heart against all the Bennets. - Mr. Fitzwilliam Darcy.”
Mary Street, The Confession of Fitzwilliam Darcy

Diana J. Oaks
“In their own brief conversations, he had the distinct impression that she was toying with him, verbally challenging him to a duel that she was certain to win, for she established the rules and kept them a secret from him. As perplexing as this was, he found her game engaging, and he inexplicably wanted more of it.”
Diana J. Oaks, One Thread Pulled: The Dance with Mr. Darcy

P.O. Dixon
“Mama will be pleased to know that her least favourite daughter is to be married."
"To her least favourite man in the world, no doubt. I clearly recall how Mrs. Bennet barely tolerated my presence when I visited Longbourne.”
P.O. Dixon, Bewitched, Body and Soul: Miss Elizabeth Bennet

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