Kerouac Quotes

Quotes tagged as "kerouac" Showing 1-30 of 31
Frank O'Hara
“Kerouac: You're ruining American poetry, O'Hara.
O'Hara: That's more than you ever did for it, Kerouac”
Frank O'Hara

Jack Kerouac
“Something that you feel will find its own form.”
Jack Kerouac

Jack Kerouac
“He had never felt anything like that before - yet somehow he knew that from now on he would always feel like that, always, and something caught at his throat as he realized what a strange sad adventure life might get to be, strange and sad and still much more beautiful and amazing than he could ever have imagined because it was so really, strangely sad.”
Jack Kerouac, The Town and the City

Joyce Johnson
“I became intent on saving him through showing him that he was loved.”
Joyce Johnson, Door Wide Open: A Beat Love Affair in Letters, 1957-1958

Jack Kerouac
“Besides, all my New York friends were in the negative, nightmare position of putting down society and giving their tired bookish or political or psychoanalytical reasons, but Dean just raced in society, eager for bread and love.”
Jack Kerouac, On the Road

Jack Kerouac
“Somewhere along the line, the pearl would be handed to me.”
Jack Kerouac, On the Road

Jack Kerouac
“...and I realized no matter what you do it’s bound to be a waste of time in the end so you might as well go mad.”
Jack Kerouac, On the Road

Sarah Vowell
“If I'm still wistful about On the Road, I look on the rest of the Kerouac oeuvre--the poems, the poems!--in horror. Read Satori in Paris lately? But if I had never read Jack Kerouac's horrendous poems, I never would have had the guts to write horrendous poems myself. I never would have signed up for Mrs. Safford's poetry class the spring of junior year, which led me to poetry readings, which introduced me to bad red wine, and after that it's all just one big blurry condemned path to journalism and San Francisco.”
Sarah Vowell, Take the Cannoli

Jack Kerouac
“What's Your Road, Man?”
Jack Kerouac, On the Road

Joyce Johnson
“I was always aware that Jack loved women not only for their bodies but for the stories that came into being as they interacted with him--they were part of his "road," the infinite range of experience that always had to remain open to fuel his work.”
Joyce Johnson, Door Wide Open: A Beat Love Affair in Letters, 1957-1958

Jack Kerouac
“November the seventh
The last
Faint cricket”
Jack Kerouac, Book of Haikus

Jack Kerouac
“One day I will find the right words, and they will be simple.”
― Jack Kerouac, The Dharma Bums”
Jack Kerouac

Hunter S. Thompson
“I have tonight begun reading a stupid, shitty book by Kerouac called Big Sur, and I would give a ball to wake up tomorrow on some empty ridge with a herd of beatniks grazing in the clearing about 200 yards below the house. And then to squat with the big boomer and feel it on my shoulder with the smell of grease and powder and, later, a little blood.”
Hunter S. Thompson, The Proud Highway: Saga of a Desperate Southern Gentleman, 1955-1967

Jack Kerouac
“I sit down and say, and I run all my friends and relatives and enemies one by one in this, without entertaining any angers or gratitudes or anything, and I say, like 'Japhy Ryder, equally empty, equally to be loved, equally a coming Buddha,' then I run on, say to 'David O. Selznick, equally empty, equally to be loved, equally a coming Buddha' though I don't use names like David O. Selznick, just people I know because when I say the words 'equally a coming Buddha' I want to be thinking of their eyes, like you take Morley, his blue eyes behind those glasses, when you think 'equally a coming Buddha' you think of those eyes and you really do suddenly see the true secret serenity and the truth of his coming Buddhahood. Then you think of your enemy's eyes.”
Jack Kerouac, The Dharma Bums

Alison Winfield-Burns
“Tis true what Hemingway says--if we're lucky enough to live our dreams in youth, as Ernest Hemingway did in 1920's Paris and I did with the Beat poets, then youth's dreams become a moveable feast you take wherever you go--youthful love remains the repast plentiful; exquisite, substantive and good. You can live on happy memories. Eat of them forever.”
Alison Winfield Burns, Ivy League Bohemians (A Girl Among Boys): Bliss Book of Columbia University's Pariah Artists

Sarah Vowell
“We all grew up, those of us who took On the Road to heart. We came to cringe a little at our old favorite poet, concluding that God was likely never Pooh Bear, that sometimes New York and California could be just as isolated as our provincial hometown, and that grown men didn't run back and forth all the time bleeding soup and sympathy out of sucker women. But those are just details, really. We got what we needed, namely a passion for unlikely words, the willingness to improvise, a distrust of authority, and a sentimental attachment to a certain America....”
Sarah Vowell, Take the Cannoli

Jack Kerouac
“Paradise!' he screamed. 'The one and only indispensable Paradise.”
Jack Kerouac, On the Road

Jack Kerouac
“Hitch hiked a thousand
miles and brought
You wine”
Jack Kerouac, Book of Haikus

Jack Kerouac
“Mientras duermo los tres se van (hacen bien) a la playa, en el coche de Sand, a treinta kilómetros de la casa; los muchachos se zambullen, nadan, Mardou se pasea por las orillas de la eternidad, mientras sus pies y los dedos de sus pies que yo tanto amo se imprimen en la arena clara, pisando las conchillas y las anémonas y las algas secas y empobrecidas, lavadas por las mareas y el viento que le despeina el cabello corto, como si la Eternidad se hubiera encontrado con Heavenly Lane (así se me ocurrió mientras estaba en la cama). (Al imaginarla por otra parte paseándose sin rumbo, con una mueca de aburrimiento, sin saber qué hacer, abandonada por Leo el Sufriente, y realmente sola e incapaz de conversar acerca de todos los fulanos, menganos y zutanos de la historia del arte con Bromberg y Sand, ¿qué podía hacer?)”
Jack Kerouac, The Subterraneans

Jack Kerouac
“...Cody is furiously explaining to his little son Tim 'Never let the right hand know what your left hand is doing'...

Page 100.”
Jack Kerouac, Big Sur

Elizabeth Gilbert
“writers like Jack Kerouac (who called himself an "urban Thoreau") set forth to redefine and rediscover ways to live in America without slogging through what Kerouac called the endless system of "work, produce, consume, work, produce, consume...”
Elizabeth Gilbert, The Last American Man

Jack Kerouac
“The other man, just as
lonesome as I am
In this empty universe”
Jack Kerouac, Book of Haikus

Jodi Lynn Anderson
“I just love crazy people like this,' Murphy said. 'Jack Kerouac people. Mad to live, mad to die, that kind of thing.”
Jodi Lynn Anderson, Peaches

Jack Kerouac
“Galatea Dunkel was a tenacious loser.”
Jack Kerouac, On the Road

Jack Kerouac
“Buds in the snow
—the deadly fight
between two birds”
Jack Kerouac, Book of Haikus

Jack Kerouac
“There ain’t no such thing as lumberjack, that must be a Back East expression. Up here we call ‘em loggers.”
Jack Kerouac, The Dharma Bums

“For Kerouac, the embodiment of American Zen was Gary Snyder, the Pulitzer Prize-winning Buddhist poet and essayist, who he fictionalized as Japhy Ryder in The Dharma Bums. Snyder was a practicing Buddhist and a translator of classic Chinese texts before Kerouac met him. He was the Zen guru of the Beats at the same time that Alan Watts popularized Buddhism for middle-class Americans in best-selling books and magazine articles of the late 1950s. Snyder had studied with Watts for a while but thought him 'square.' 'He was cool in relation to the people around him,' Snyder once said, referring to 'middle class, needy' Americans, but he was 'never actually cool.' Then Snyder added with a wink, '[and] you know what I mean, as the Big Bopper says,' invoking the rock-and-roll classic 'Chantilly Lace' for those hip and in-the-know.”
Joel Dinerstein, The Origins of Cool in Postwar America

Jack Kerouac
“Rėjaus maldelė:
"...... (vardas) toks pats tuščias, toks pat mylimas, toks pat būsimas Buda.”
Kerouac Jack

“La vita è un viaggio sulla strada, dall’utero fino alla fine della notte, in cui si continua a tendere il cordone d’argento finché non si rompe da qualche parte lungo il cammino.”
Kerouac, Jack

Steven Moore
“So: an epic novel of the Tathagata? Yes, but not a very good one. Kerouac would have done better.”
Steven Moore, The Novel: An Alternative History: Beginnings to 1600

« previous 1