Alan Watts Quotes

Quotes tagged as "alan-watts" (showing 1-10 of 10)
Alan W. Watts
“When you find out that there was never anything in the dark side to be afraid of … Nothing is left but to love.”
Alan W. Watts

Alan W. Watts
“In a relativistic universe you don't cling to anything, you learn to swim. And you know what swimming is - it's kind of a relaxed attitude with the water. In which you don't keep yourself afloat by holding the water, but by a certain giving to it.”
Alan W. Watts, The Essential Alan Watts

Alan W. Watts
“Evil” read backwards is “live.” Demon est deus inversus.”
Alan W. Watts, Does It Matter?

Alan W. Watts
“The knowledge of the past stays with us. To let go is simply to release any images and emotions.”
Alan W. Watts

“I feel cut off only because I am split within myself, because I try to be divided from my own feelings and sensations. What I feel and sense therefore seems foreign to me. And on being aware of the unreality of this division, the universe does not seem foreign any more.

For I am what I know; what I know is I. The sensation of a house across the street or of a star in outer space is no less I than an itch on the sole of my foot or an idea in my brain.”
Alan Watts, A sabedoria da insegurança: Uma mensagem para a Era da Ansiedade

Curtis Tyrone Jones
“‪A wise man once said, 'Life is like breathing. If you try to hold it, you'll lose it. But let it come & go & you'll always be connected to it.'‬”
Curtis Tyrone Jones

Alan W. Watts
“I feel cut off only because I am split within myself, because I try to be divided from my own feelings and sensations. What I feel and sense therefore seems foreign to me. And on being aware of the unreality of this division, the universe does not seem foreign any more.

For I am what I know; what I know is I. The sensation of a house across the street or of a star in outer space is no less I than an itch on the sole of my foot or an idea in my brain.”
Alan W. Watts, The Wisdom of Insecurity: A Message for an Age of Anxiety

“For Kerouac, the embodiment of American Zen was Gary Snyder, the Pulitzer Prize-winning Buddhist poet and essayist, who he fictionalized as Japhy Ryder in The Dharma Bums. Snyder was a practicing Buddhist and a translator of classic Chinese texts before Kerouac met him. He was the Zen guru of the Beats at the same time that Alan Watts popularized Buddhism for middle-class Americans in best-selling books and magazine articles of the late 1950s. Snyder had studied with Watts for a while but thought him 'square.' 'He was cool in relation to the people around him,' Snyder once said, referring to 'middle class, needy' Americans, but he was 'never actually cool.' Then Snyder added with a wink, '[and] you know what I mean, as the Big Bopper says,' invoking the rock-and-roll classic 'Chantilly Lace' for those hip and in-the-know.”
Joel Dinerstein, The Origins of Cool in Postwar America

Alan W. Watts
“But the attitude of faith is to let go, and become open to truth, whatever it might turn out to be.”
Alan W. Watts

Ryan Holiday
“A person who thinks all the time has nothing to think about except thoughts, so he loses touch with reality and lives in a world of illusions.”
Ryan Holiday, Ego Is the Enemy