Jack Kerouac Quotes

Quotes tagged as "jack-kerouac" (showing 1-30 of 61)
Jack Kerouac
“Let the mind beware, that though the flesh be bugged, the circumstances of existence are pretty glorious.”
Jack Kerouac, The Dharma Bums

Jack Kerouac
“A scene should be selected by the writer for haunted-ness-of-mind interest.
If you're not haunted by something, as by a dream, a vision, or a memory, which are involuntary, you're not interested or even involved.”
Jack Kerouac, Book of Sketches

Jack Kerouac
“Hateful bitch of a world, it wouldn't ever last.”
Jack Kerouac, Book of Sketches

Jack Kerouac
“Sweet life continues in the breeze, in the golden fields.”
Jack Kerouac, Book of Sketches

William S. Burroughs
“Everything Jack says is to be taken with considerable reserve.”
William S. Burroughs

Jack Kerouac
“The trouble with fashions is you want to fuck the women in their fashions but when the time comes they always take them off so they don't get wrinkled.
Face it, the really great fucks in a man's life was when there was no time to take yr clothes off, you were too hot and she was too hot - none of yr Bohemian leisure, this was middleclass explosions against snowbanks, against walls of shithouses in attics, on sudden couches in the lobby -
Talk about yr hot peace.”
Jack Kerouac, Book of Sketches

Jack Kerouac
“At night in this part of the West the stars, as I had seen them in Wyoming, were as big as Roman Candles and as lonely as the Prince who's lost his ancestral home and journeys across the spaces trying to find it again, and knows he never will.”
Jack Kerouac, On the Road

Jack Kerouac
“It’s a sort of furtiveness … Like we were a generation of furtive. You know, with an inner knowledge there’s no use flaunting on that level, the level of the ‘public’, a kind of beatness – I mean, being right down to it, to ourselves, because we all really know where we are – and a weariness with all the forms, all the conventions of the world … It’s something like that. So I guess you might say we’re a beat generation.”
Jack Kerouac

Jack Kerouac
“And suddenly, not a soul's at the store as for other & similar & just as blank reasons, they've gone to the silence, the suppers of their own mystery.”
Jack Kerouac, Book of Sketches

Jack Kerouac
“Non avevo niente da offrire a nessuno tranne la mia confusione.”
Jack Kerouac, On the Road

Jack Kerouac
“Y es así como, una vez obtenida la esencia de su amor, ahora erijo grandes construcciones verbales, y de ese modo en realidad lo traiciono, repitiendo calumnias como quien tiende las sábanas sucias al mundo; y las suyas, las nuestras, durante los dos meses de nuestro amor (así lo creí) sólo fueron lavadas una vez, porque ella era una subterránea solitaria que se pasaba los días abstraída y decidida a llevarlas al lavadero, pero de pronto se descubre que ya es casi de noche y demasiado tarde, y las sábanas ya están grises, hermosas para mí porque así son más suaves.”
Jack Kerouac, The Subterraneans

Allen Ginsberg
“I have just discovered that I have no feelings, just thoughts, borrowed thoughts taken from someone I admire because he seems to have feelings.”
Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg: The Letters

Allen Ginsberg
“I am bored with these frantic cravings, tired of them and therefore myself, and contemptuous though tolerant of all my vast powers of self-pity and self-expressive misery.”
Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg: The Letters

Jack Kerouac
“Maybe that's a haiku, maybe not, it might be a little too complicated," said Japhy. "A real haiku's gotta be as simple as porridge and yet make you see the real thing, like the greatest haiku of them all probably is the one that goes 'The sparrow hops along the veranda, with wet feet.' By Shiki. You see the wet footprints like a vision in your mind and yet in those few words you also see all the rain that's been falling that day and almost smell the wet pine needles."

(The Dharma Bums, Chap. 8)”
Jack Kerouac, The Dharma Bums

Jack Kerouac
“Çin mahallesinden gelen kızartma kokusu, North Beach'ten gelen spagetti sosu kokusu, Fisherman's Wharf'tan gelen yumuşak kabuklu ıstakoz kokusu, oh, hepsi nasıl da karışıp havayı tatlandırıyordu! Ya Fillmore'un şişte dönen pirzolaları? Market Caddesinin ateşten yeni inmiş fasulyeli çilisi, ayyaş Embarcadero gecesinin Fransız usulü kızarmış patatesi, körfezin karşı tarafındaki Sausalito'nun tütsülenmiş istiridyesi: işte benim ahlarla dolu San Francisco düşüm. Ve sis, insanı acıktıran sis, yumuşacık gecede titreşen neonlar, yüksek ökçeli güzelliklerin tıkırtısı, bir Çinlinin dükkanını süsleyen beyaz güvercinler...”
Jack Kerouac, On the Road

Jack Kerouac
“But Dave Wain that lean rangy red head Welchman with his penchant for going off in Willie to fish in the Rogue River up in Oregon where he knows an abandoned mining camp, or for blattin around the desert roads, for suddenly reappearing in town to get drunk, and a marvelous poet himself, has that certain something that young hip teenagers probably wanta imitate–For one thing is one of the world's best talkers, and funny too–As I'll show–It was he and George Baso who hit on the fantastically simple truth that everybody in America was walking around with a dirty behind, but everybody, because the ancient ritual of washing with water after the toilet had not occurred in all the modern antisepticism–Says Dave "People in America have all these racks of drycleaned clothes like you say on their trips, they spatter Eau de Cologne all over themselves, they wear Ban and Aid or whatever it is under their armpits, they get aghast to see a spot on a shirt or a dress, they probably change underwear and socks maybe even twice a day, they go around all puffed up and insolent thinking themselves the cleanest people on earth and they're walkin around with dirty azzoles–Isnt that amazing?give me a little nip on that tit" he says reaching for my drink so I order two more, I've been engrossed, Dave can order all the drinks he wants anytime, "The President of the United States, the big ministers of state, the great bishops and shmishops and big shots everywhere, down to the lowest factory worker with all his fierce pride, movie stars, executives and great engineers and presidents of law firms and advertising firms with silk shirts and neckties and great expensive traveling cases in which they place these various expensive English imported hair brushes and shaving gear and pomades and perfumes are all walkin around with dirty azzoles! All you gotta do is simply wash yourself with soap and water! it hasn't occurred to anybody in America at all! it's one of the funniest things I've ever heard of! dont you think it's marvelous that we're being called filthy unwashed beatniks but we're the only ones walkin around with clean azzoles?"–The whole azzole shot in fact had spread swiftly and everybody I knew and Dave knew from coast to coast had embarked on this great crusade which I must say is a good one–In fact in Big Sur I'd instituted a shelf in Monsanto's outhouse where the soap must be kept and everyone had to bring a can of water there on each trip–Monsanto hadnt heard about it yet, "Do you realize that until we tell poor Lorenzo Monsanto the famous writer that he is walking around with a dirty azzole he will be doing just that?"–"Let's go tell him right now!"–"Why of course if we wait another minute...and besides do you know what it does to people to walk around with a dirty azzole? it leaves a great yawning guilt that they cant understand all day, they go to work all cleaned up in the morning and you can smell all that freshly laundered clothes and Eau de Cologne in the commute train yet there's something gnawing at them, something's wrong, they know something's wrong they dont know just what!"–We rush to tell Monsanto at once in the book store around the corner.

(Big Sur, Chap. 11)”
Jack Kerouac, Big Sur

Allen Ginsberg
“I hadn't thought about what any army trains for. It merely maintains itself here for no exterior purpose.”
Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg: The Letters

Jack Kerouac
“When you write letters to me, try not to be sophomoric and moribund about your criticisms of Jean et son weltanschauung [and his worldview.] A little more finesse, please, or if possible, a dash of humor.”
Jack Kerouac, Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg: The Letters

Jack Kerouac
“He [William S Burroughs] has no patience for my kind of neurosis, I know... But since then I've been facing my nature full in the face and the result is a purge.”
Jack Kerouac, Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg: The Letters

Jack Kerouac
“There is a kind of dreary monotony about there characters, an American sameness about them that never varies and is always dull.”
Jack Kerouac, Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg: The Letters

Jack Kerouac
“I'm afraid that you'll never understand me fully, and because of that, sometimes you'll be frightened, disgusted, annoyed, or pleased.”
Jack Kerouac, Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg: The Letters

Jack Kerouac
“It reminds me of a remark Lucien [Carr] once made to me: He said "You never seem to give yourself away completely, but of course dark-haired people are so mysterious.”
Jack Kerouac, Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg: The Letters

Allen Ginsberg
“You were right, I suppose, in keeping your distance. I was too intent on self-fulfillment, and rather crude about it, with all my harlequinade and conscious manipulation of your pity.”
Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg: The Letters

Allen Ginsberg
“Love is only a recognition of our own guilt and imperfection, and a supplication for forgiveness to the perfect beloved. This is why we love those who are more beautiful than ourselves, why we fear them, and why we must be unhappy lovers.”
Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg: The Letters

Allen Ginsberg
“Why are you afraid to submit to the annihilation of such stupid meaningless unreal knowledge. This is the abyss. Everything is green, love, without the logical fantastic equivocations that we invent so that we won't actually have to face each other.”
Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg: The Letters

Allen Ginsberg
“Assuming I am mad (Ha!) god, how I must have suffered to go mad. And all the time I was calling to people to save me and no one put out his hand and held it. This is like suicide, only I am alive and looking out of this living death I can see the people weep and feel sorry. Alas, nobody even weeps. It's all a dream.”
Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg: The Letters

Allen Ginsberg
“I want to see you. I feel more and more at with you now actually than ever before, I feel you more, actually more clarity, more confidence, more trust.”
Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg: The Letters

Jack Kerouac
“I decided someday to become a Thoreau of the Mountains. To live like Jesus and Thoreau, except for women.”
Jack Kerouac, Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg: The Letters

William S. Burroughs
“After 1957 On The Road sold a trillion levis and a million espresso coffee machines, and also sent countless kids on the road. This was of course due in part to the media, the arch-opportunists. They know a story when they see one, and the Beat movement was a story, and a big one . . . The Beat literary movement came at exactly the right time and said something that millions of people of all nationalities all over the world were waiting to hear. You can't tell anybody anything he doesn't know already. The alienation, the restlessness, the dissatisfaction were already there waiting when Kerouac pointed out the road.”
William S. Burroughs

Jack Kerouac
“I've realized something utterly strange and yet common, I think I've experienced the deep turning about. At present I am completely happy and feel completely free, I love everybody and intend to go on doing so, I know that I am an imaginary blossom and so it my literary life and my literary accomplishments are so many useless imaginary blossoms. Reality isn't images. But I do things anyhow because I am free from self, free from delusion, free from anger, I love everyone equally, as equally empty and equally coming Buddhas.”
Jack Kerouac, Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg: The Letters

« previous 1 3