Himalayas Quotes

Quotes tagged as "himalayas" Showing 1-24 of 24
Jeffrey Rasley
“Chasing angels or fleeing demons, go to the mountains.”
Jeffrey Rasley, Bringing Progress to Paradise: What I Got from Giving to a Mountain Village in Nepal

Subrahmanijan Chandrasekhar
“The pursuit of science has often been compared to the scaling of mountains, high and not so high. But who amongst us can hope, even in imagination, to scale the Everest and reach its summit when the sky is blue and the air is still, and in the stillness of the air survey the entire Himalayan range in the dazzling white of the snow stretching to infinity? None of us can hope for a comparable vision of nature and of the universe around us. But there is nothing mean or lowly in standing in the valley below and awaiting the sun to rise over Kinchinjunga.”
Subrahmanijan Chandrasekhar, Truth and Beauty: Aesthetics and Motivations in Science

Heinrich Harrer
“There were only three names on the map of the region we had brought with us, but we now filled in more than two hundred.”
Heinrich Harrer, Seven Years in Tibet

Jane Wilson-Howarth
“The mountains were so wild and so stark and so very beautiful that I wanted to cry. I breathed in another wonderful moment to keep safe in my heart.”
Jane Wilson-Howarth, Snowfed Waters

“Meditating always like the great Saint.Completely detached and completely one with the universe.

You are taller than anyone,
Stronger than anyone.
Thunder can't shake you nor can the clouds reach you.
You are fearless.

You are at the highest state, yet you are down and hold the strongest attachment with our Mother Earth.
You are Ego-less.

Your purity make the Nature run through you and virgin snow have the honor to make the beautiful scarf for you.
You are absolutely pure.

You witness all our drama, forgiving always no matter what and keep showering your blessings with the great treasure of Nature and for the survival of life in this heavenly planet of Earth.

We salute you O’ Great Saint - The Great Himalayas.”
Ricky Saikia

“The land north of Gangadwar is known to the wise as Paradise Ground. Apart from this land, the rest is called Earth elsewhere.”
Kedarkhand Skanda Purana

Heinrich Harrer
“The country through which we had been travelling for days has an original beauty. Wide plains were diversified by stretches of hilly country with low passes. We often had to wade through swift running ice-cold brooks. It has long since we had seen a glacier, but as we were approaching the tasam at Barka, a chain of glaciers gleaming in the sunshine came into view. The landscape was dominated by the 25,000-foot peak of Gurla Mandhata; less striking, but far more famous, was the sacred Mount Kailash, 3,000 feet lower, which stands in majestic isolation apart from the Himalayan range.”
Heinrich Harrer, Seven Years in Tibet

Heinrich Harrer
“The name Kyirong means “the village of happiness,” and it really deserves the name. I shall never cease thinking of this place with yearning, and if I can choose where to pass the evening of my life, it will be in Kyirong. There I would build myself a house of red cedar wood and have one of the rushing mountain streams running through my garden, in which every kind of fruit would grow, for though its altitude is over 9,000 feet, Kyirong lies on the twenty-eighth parallel. When we arrived in January the temperature was just below freezing it seldom falls below -10 degrees Centigrade. The seasons correspond to the Alps, but the vegetation is subtropical. Once can go skiing the whole year round, and in the summer there is a row of 20,000-footers to climb.”
Heinrich Harrer, Seven Years in Tibet

Vinita Kinra
“If Ganges is the mother, Himalayas is the father. One nurtures and nourishes, the other provides and protects.”
Vinita Kinra

Manjushree Thapa
“Tourists who come to Nepal look at terraced fields and see their beauty but remain blind to the hard labour they extract from tillers.”
Manjushree Thapa, Forget Kathmandu: An Elegy for Democracy

Jeffrey Rasley
“He wasn't a great man, but he had a great life.”
Jeffrey Rasley, Light in the Mountains -- A Hoosier Quaker Finds Communal Enlightenment in Nepal

Anita Desai
“It was as if the curtains came down on all this, if not entirely obliterated it, when the monsoon rose up in the thunderous clouds from the parched valley below to engulf the hills, invade them with the opaque mist in which a pine tree or a mountain top appeared only intermittently, and then unleashed a downpour that brought Ravi's rambling to a halt and confined him to the house for days at a time, deafened by the rain drumming on the rooftop and cascading down the gutters and through the spouts to rush downhill in torrents.”
Anita Desai, The Artist of Disappearance

Jane Wilson-Howarth
“… everything was fresh, green and particularly beautiful. Afternoon light, filtering between remnants of monsoon clouds, picked out gullies and spot-lit patches of forest and scrub on the convoluted ridges of the rim of the Kathmandu Valley. Or, after a rainstorm, wisps of clouds clung to the trees as if scared to let go. Behind, himals peeked out shyly between the clouds.”
Jane Wilson-Howarth, A Glimpse of Eternal Snows: A Journey of Love and Loss in the Himalayas

Rumer Godden
“Towards four o'clock the dew fell, and she smelled a gust of sweetness from the roses and a paleness showed in the sky to the East. It was cold; the wetness was cold on her hands and she felt her skirt dragging around her ankles... the light spread, there were long lines of cloud in the sky and presently above them the outline of the snow peaks appeared, cold and hard as if they were made of iron; they turned from black to grey to white while the hills were still in darkness.
Then the forest came, mysteriously out of the darkness, and the light moved down, turning the trees dark blue and green, and the terrace was full of a swimming light that was colourless and confusing... Then she looked up and saw that the Himalayas were showing in their full range, and were coloured in ash and orange and precious Chinese pink, deeper in the east, paler in the west.
The people called it 'the flowering of the snows”
Rumer Godden, Black Narcissus

Susan Jagannath
“It is the mountain that has been calling me, and it’s time to answer.”
Susan Jagannath, Chasing Himalayan Dreams

Jane Wilson-Howarth
“red-trunked rhododendron trees looked like so many writhing russet snakes. In some places the forest floor was carpeted crimson with fallen rhododendron petals.”
Jane Wilson-Howarth, Chasing the Tiger

Susan Jagannath
“The Himalayas are a holy land, dotted with sacred lakes, divine peaks and blue glaciers that gleam and soar in the collective imagination of the sub-continent”
Susan Jagannath, Chasing Himalayan Dreams

Jane Wilson-Howarth
“Snow always makes me think of ice-cream. Glaciers look like where it’s dribbled.”
Jane Wilson-Howarth, Himalayan Kidnap

Jane Wilson-Howarth
“Huge up-draughts – invisible forces – tossed our little plane like it was an insect.”
Jane Wilson-Howarth, Himalayan Kidnap

Susan Jagannath
“I want to gaze at the Five Treasures of Snows; Kanchenjunga, that rears up like a frozen wave of ice.”
Susan Jagannath, Chasing Himalayan Dreams

Jane Wilson-Howarth
“Morning mists skulked over the river.”
Jane Wilson-Howarth, A Glimpse of Eternal Snows: A Journey of Love and Loss in the Himalayas

Jane Wilson-Howarth
“When we reached the prayer flags and a pile of rocks that marked the highest point on the pass, the view was brilliant. There was hardly a cloud in the sky. To the south we could see rolling foothills: the gentle ups and downs that we’d walked through. Some of the hillsides were red or purple with rhododendron blossoms. To the west and east there was a muddle of ridges and spurs. To the north, there were several mighty snow-capped himals. The real Himalayan giants were mostly east of where we stood. We were a very long way from anywhere. We were a very long way from help.”
Jane Wilson-Howarth, Chasing the Tiger

Nguyễn Tường Bách
“Phía Đông của cao nguyên Tây Tạng là chỗ xuất phát của nhiều con sông lớn nữa, trong đó có Hoàng Hà, Trường Giang và Cửu Long. Hoàng Hà và Trường Giang là hai con sông trọng yếu nhất của Trung Quốc, dòng chảy của chúng là quê hương của một nền văn hóa thâm hậu nhất của loài người mà về sau tôi sẽ đi thăm. Còn Cửu Long là nguồn sống của nhiều nước Đông Nam Á, trong đó có Việt Nam. Nếu lấy cao nguyên Tây Tạng làm tâm điểm, vẽ một vòng tròn bán kính chưa đến ngàn cây số thì vòng tròn đó bao gồm tất cả nguồn cội của những con sông nói ở trên. Chỉ điều đó thôi đã gây cho tôi một lòng kính sợ đối với cao nguyên Tây Tạng, "nóc nhà của thế giới". Đúng, không phải là sự ngẫu nhiên khi ánh sáng của minh triết loài người xuất phát từ vùng đất lạ lùng này. Tôi đã đến Cửu Long giang miền Tây Nam Bộ và từng thấy con nước mãnh liệt của nó. Nguồn của nó không phải tầm thường, dòng sông đó là anh em với Hằng hà, Trường Giang, nó mang khí lạnh của Hy Mã, sức sáng của tuyết trắng, sự uy nghi của non cao, cái bí ẩn của các Man-đa-la vô hình. Nếu nó có bị ô nhiễm thì cũng vì con người bạc nghĩa, thế nhưng dù thế nó vẫn nhân hậu sống theo người. Nó vẫn không hế mất tính thiêng liêng của nguồn cội và vì tâm người ô nhiễm nên cảm nhận chúng nhiễm ô. Về sau, tôi còn đến Hằng hà nhiều lần trên bước lữ hành tại Ấn Độ cũng như sẽ có dịp đi dọc Trường Giang qua những vùng linh địa của Trung Quốc. Rồi lại có ngày tôi đã tôi đã đến cao nguyên Tây Tạng, đi dọc sông Tsangpo chảy từ hàm ngựa và thở hít không khí loãng trên miền đất cao 4000m trong Man-đa-la vĩ đại của địa cầu. Một ngày nào đó hy vọng tôi sẽ có dịp đến thượng nguồn Cửu Long, sẽ thấy một màu nước xanh lục như màu nước Hằng hà và sẽ nhớ về miền Tây Nam Bộ của mình.”
Nguyễn Tường Bách, Mùi hương trầm

Anita Desai
“There was no one to whom he could explain that in order to survive he needed to be at altitude, a Himalayan altitude, so he might breathe.”
Anita Desai, The Artist of Disappearance