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Wildlife Quotes

Quotes tagged as "wildlife" Showing 1-30 of 217
Steve Irwin
“Crocodiles are easy. They try to kill and eat you. People are harder. Sometimes they pretend to be your friend first.”
Steve Irwin

Lawrence Anthony
“The only good cage is an empty cage.”
Lawrence Anthony, The Elephant Whisperer

Steve Irwin
“If we can teach people about wildlife, they will be touched. Share my wildlife with me. Because humans want to save things that they love.”
Steve Irwin

Terri Irwin
“Crocodiles are easy,' Steve said. 'They try to kill and eat you. People are harder. Sometimes they pretend to be your friend first.”
Terri Irwin, Steve & Me

Munia Khan
“Wild animals are less wild and more human than many humans of this world”
Munia Khan

Carl Hiaasen
“That's what people do when they find a special place that wild and full of life, they trample it to death.”
Carl Hiaasen, Flush

“The smaller the creature, the bolder its spirit.”
Suzy Kassem, Rise Up and Salute the Sun: The Writings of Suzy Kassem

“Every creature was designed to serve a purpose. Learn from animals for they are there to teach you the way of life. There is a wealth of knowledge that is openly accessible in nature. Our ancestors knew this and embraced the natural cures found in the bosoms of the earth. Their classroom was nature. They studied the lessons to be learned from animals. Much of human behavior can be explained by watching the wild beasts around us. They are constantly teaching us things about ourselves and the way of the universe, but most people are too blind to watch and listen.”
Suzy Kassem, Rise Up and Salute the Sun: The Writings of Suzy Kassem

“Much of human behavior can be explained by watching the wild beasts around us. They are constantly teaching us things about ourselves and the way of the universe, but most people are too blind to watch and listen.”
Suzy Kassem, Rise Up and Salute the Sun: The Writings of Suzy Kassem

Chris Palmer
“In this image-driven age, wildlife filmmakers carry a heavy responsibility. They can influence how we think and behave when we’re in nature. They can even influence how we raise our kids, how we vote and volunteer in our communities, as well as the future of our wildlands and wildlife. If the stories they create are misleading or false in some way, viewers will misunderstand the issues and react in inappropriate ways. People who consume a heavy diet of wildlife films filled with staged violence and aggression, for example, are likely to think about nature as a circus or a freak show. They certainly won’t form the same positive connections to the natural world as people who watch more thoughtful, authentic, and conservation-oriented films.”
Chris Palmer, Shooting in the Wild: An Insider's Account of Making Movies in the Animal Kingdom

Doug Peacock
“The dangerous temptation of wildlife films is that they can lull us into thinking we can get by without the original models -- that we might not need animals in the flesh.”
Doug Peacock, Grizzly Years: In Search of the American Wilderness

Julie  Murphy
“A male frigate bird blows up a wild red pouch on his neck. He can keep it puffed up for hours. It is his way of impressing the girls.”
Julie Murphy, Seabirds

“It may be underfunded and at times mismanaged, but the [Endangered Species] Act is an unprecedented attempt to delegate human-caused extinction to the chapters of history we would rather not revisit: the Slave Trade, the Indian Removal Policy, the subjection of women, child labor, segregation. The Endangered Species Act is a zero-tolerance law: no new extinctions. It keeps eyes on the ground with legal backing-the gun may be in the holster most of the time, but its available if necessary to keep species from disappearing. I discovered in my travels that a law protecting all animals and plants, all of nature, might be as revolutionary-and as American-as the Declaration of Independence.”
Joe Roman, Listed

Heather Durham
“Sometimes, I am the beast in the darkness. Sometimes, I am the ghost.”
Heather Durham, Going Feral: Field Notes on Wonder and Wanderlust

Nan Shepherd
“Imagination is haunted by the swiftness of the creatures that live on the mountain - eagle and peregrine falcon, red deer and mountain hare. The reason for their swiftness is severely practical: food is so scarce up there that only those who can move swiftly over vast stretches of ground may hope to survive. The speed, the whorls and torrents of movement, are in plain fact the mountain's own necessity. But their grace is not necessity. Or if it is - if the swoop, the parabola, the arrow-flight of hooves and wings achieve their beauty by strict adherence to the needs of function - so much the more is the mountain's integrity vindicated. Beauty is not adventitious but essential.”
Nan Shepherd, The Living Mountain

“Remember that even just watching animals has an impact. Intrusion into their living space can expose them to predation, keep them from feeding or other essential activities, or cause them to leave their young exposed to predation or the elements. No photo or viewing opportunity is worth harassing or stressing wildlife. In appreciating and watching them, we have a responsibility to protect and preserve the animals that share our state.”
Mary Taylor Young, The Guide to Colorado Mammals

“A trademark of something that works well, the cat body has hardly changed since its inception. Like with today's cats, their digestive systems could handle only flesh. The lesson of the cat is that if you are to become a full-fledged carnivore, you have to commit everything to it. A house cat fed vegetarian food will shrivel and die.”
Craig Childs, The Animal Dialogues: Uncommon Encounters in the Wild

Chris Palmer
“Audiences see personalities on shows interacting with wild animals as if they were not dangerous or, at the other extreme, provoking them to give viewers an adrenaline rush. Mostly, the animals just want to be left alone, so it’s not surprising that these entertainers are seriously hurt or even killed on rare occasions. On one level, it’s that very possibility the shows are selling.”
Chris Palmer, Shooting in the Wild: An Insider's Account of Making Movies in the Animal Kingdom

“I spent my summers at my grandparents’ cabin in Estes Park, literally next door to Rocky Mountain National Park. We had a view of Longs Peak across the valley and the giant rock beaver who, my granddad told me, was forever climbing toward the summit of the mountain. We awoke to mule deer peering in the windows and hummingbirds buzzing around the red-trimmed feeders; spent the days chasing chipmunks across the boulders of Deer Mountain and the nights listening to coyotes howling in the dark.”
Mary Taylor Young, The Guide to Colorado Mammals

“They noticed that Earth tilted in relation to the sun, offering first one hemisphere and then the other over the course of the year ...”
Kieran Mulvaney, The Great White Bear: A Natural and Unnatural History of the Polar Bear

“Then the bear jumped on the tent.”
Kieran Mulvaney, The Great White Bear: A Natural and Unnatural History of the Polar Bear

“But Churchill lies directly in the path of polar bears that migrate from summer shelter to the coast of Hudson Bay in anticipation of the bay's waters freezing; it was one thing to have experienced, as I had on several occasions, a moose lying in the driveway or walking down the street, but the prospect of a large and hungry carnivore lurking around the corner seeming to me an entirely different proposition.”
Kieran Mulvaney, The Great White Bear: A Natural and Unnatural History of the Polar Bear

“For Churchill residents, particularly those who, like Lance, grew up in the community, bear awareness is. both ingrained and a matter of pride; appropriately safe behaviors are second-nature. The approach is one of neither blustering bravado nor crippling caution; common sense prevails”
Kieran Mulvaney, The Great White Bear: A Natural and Unnatural History of the Polar Bear

“Bobier and colleagues give annual talks on safety to the town's children, lessons that they hope will stay with them through adulthood.”
Kieran Mulvaney, The Great White Bear: A Natural and Unnatural History of the Polar Bear

“Bobier has been known to refer to tourists as "walking snacks”
Kieran Mulvaney, The Great White Bear: A Natural and Unnatural History of the Polar Bear

“Or was it in fact displaying the predatory patience for which polar bears are famed, lying quietly in anticipation of the moment when one of us would lean too far forward and into striking distance?”
Kieran Mulvaney, The Great White Bear: A Natural and Unnatural History of the Polar Bear

“But at the other end of the spectrum, they continued, are four 'ice-obligate' species that depend on sea ice as a platform for hunting, breeding, and resting, and for which future prospects are dim indeed. They listed the walrus as one of those species; bearded and ringed seals were two of the other three ... the fourth member of the afore-mentioned 'ice-obligate' club, is, of course, the polar bear.”
Kieran Mulvaney, The Great White Bear: A Natural and Unnatural History of the Polar Bear

Roy   Taylor
“Writing a book is both rewarding and inspiring The preparation, research and introduction of new chapters to an ever increasing text provides enormous excitement as one gets closer and closer to completion The culmination of all the hours of work combined with the emotional input in its creation cannot describe the sense of pride and accomplishment when it is finally published”
Roy Taylor, African Sunsets: A Settlers' Story

“I am not a Lion because I was born a Lion, it's because a Lion was born in me”
Paul Oxton

“Before we can truly understand the Animal Kingdom, we must first learn to respect all of the sentient beings that exist within it”
Paul Oxton

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