Everest Quotes

Quotes tagged as "everest" (showing 1-27 of 27)
George Mallory
“People ask me, 'What is the use of climbing Mount Everest?' and my answer must at once be, 'It is of no use.'There is not the slightest prospect of any gain whatsoever. Oh, we may learn a little about the behaviour of the human body at high altitudes, and possibly medical men may turn our observation to some account for the purposes of aviation. But otherwise nothing will come of it. We shall not bring back a single bit of gold or silver, not a gem, nor any coal or iron... If you cannot understand that there is something in man which responds to the challenge of this mountain and goes out to meet it, that the struggle is the struggle of life itself upward and forever upward, then you won't see why we go. What we get from this adventure is just sheer joy. And joy is, after all, the end of life. We do not live to eat and make money. We eat and make money to be able to live. That is what life means and what life is for.”
George Mallory, Climbing Everest: The Complete Writings of George Mallory

George Mallory
“Because it's there.”
George Mallory

Jon Krakauer
“Everest has always been a magnet for kooks, publicity seekers, hopeless romantics and others with a shaky hold on reality.”
Jon Krakauer, Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mount Everest Disaster

George Mallory
“For the stone from the top for geologists, the knowledge of the limits of endurance for the doctors, but above all for the spirit of adventure to keep alive the soul of man.”
George Mallory

George Mallory
“How to get the best of it all? One must conquer, achieve, get to the top; one must know the end to be convinced that one can win the end - to know there's no dream that mustn't be dared. . . Is this the summit, crowning the day? How cool and quiet! We're not exultant; but delighted, joyful; soberly astonished. . . Have we vanquished an enemy? None but ourselves. Have we gained success? That word means nothing here. Have we won a kingdom? No. . . and yes. We have achieved an ultimate satisfaction. . . fulfilled a destiny. . . To struggle and to understand - never this last without the other; such is the law. . .”
George Mallory, Climbing Everest: The Complete Writings of George Mallory

John McPhee
“When the climbers in 1953 planted their flags on the highest mountain, they set them in snow over the skeletons of creatures that had lived in the warm clear ocean that India, moving north, blanked out. Possibly as much as twenty thousand feet below the seafloor, the skeletal remains had turned into rock. This one fact is a treatise in itself on the movements of the surface of the earth. If by some fiat I had to restrict all this writing to one sentence, this is the one I would choose: The summit of Mt. Everest is marine limestone.”
John McPhee, Annals of the Former World

George Mallory
“My mind is in a state of constant rebellion. I believe that will always be so.”
George Mallory

Jon Krakauer
“This forms the nub of a dilemna that every Everest climber eventually comes up against: in order to succeed you must be exceedingly driven, but if you're too driven you're likely to die.”
Jon Krakauer, Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mount Everest Disaster

“But there are men for whom the unattainable has a special attraction. Usually they are not experts: their ambitions and fantasies are strong enough to brush aside the doubts which more cautious men might have. Determination and faith are their strongest weapons. At best such men are regarded as eccentric; at worst, mad...”
Walt Unsworth, Everest: A Mountaineering History

Reinhold Messner
“When I rest I feel utterly lifeless except that my throat burns when I draw breath... I can scarcely go on. No despair, no happiness, no anxiety. I have not lost the mastery of my feelings, there are actually no more feelings. I consist only of will. After each few metres this too fizzles out in unending tiredness. Then I think nothing. I let myself fall, just lie there. For an indefinite time I remain completely irresolute. Then I make a few steps again.”
Reinhold Messner, Crystal Horizon: Everest: The First Solo Ascent

“Mountains are both journey and destination. They summon us to climb their slopes, explore their canyons, and attempt their summits. The summit, despite months of preparation and toil, is never guaranteed though tastes of sweet nectar when reached. If my only goal as a teacher and mountaineer is the summit, I risk cruel failure if I do not reach the highest apex. Instead, if I accept the mountain’s invitation to journey and create meaning in each step, success is manifest in every moment.”
TA Loeffler

Jon Krakauer
“I didn't doubt the potential value of paying attention to subconscious cues...problem was, my inner voice resembled Chicken Little: it was screaming that I was about to die, but it did that almost every time I laced up my climbing boots.”
Jon Krakauer, Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mount Everest Disaster

Kathryn Hurn
“How easily such a thing can become a mania, how the most normal and sensible of women once this passion to be thin is upon them, can lose completely their sense of balance and proportion and spend years dealing with this madness.”
Kathryn Hurn, HELL HEAVEN & IN-BETWEEN: One Woman's Journey to Finding Love

“Looking out of a tent door into a world of snow and vanishing hopes. ~George Mallory”
Conrad Anker, The Lost Explorer: Finding Mallory on Mt. Everest

“Lest others should attempt the ascent of this terrible climb and perish, they swore themselves to secrecy (telling only enough people to ensure the perpetuation of their epic) and went off to try Everest instead.”
Whipplesnaith

“Everest attempt at sixty-two, three weeks after undergoing surgery for kidney cancer, marathon des Sables six months after it was amputated fingers and toes, be measured by the diagonal of Fools four weeks after ablation of a metastasis to the lung, is this possible? Cancer does not stop your life, giving up your dreams or your goals, it is simply a parameter to manage, no more, no less than all the other parameters of life.
How to ensure that the disease becomes transparent to you and your entourage, almost insignificant in terms of trip you want to accomplish? This is precisely the question that Gerard Bourrat tries to answer in this book. To make a sports performance, to live with her cancer, to live well with amputations, the path is always the same: a goal, the joy of effort, perseverance and faith.
This book does not commit you to climb Everest, to run under a blazing sun, walking thousands of miles, it invites you to conquer your own Everest.”
Gérard Bourrat, L'éverest, Le Cancer, La Vie

“The most notable event of George's U.S. tour, at least in the public mind, consisted of a four-word quote that has been ascribed to him as his answer to the question: why do you want to climb Everest? George's reply, 'Because it is there,' has been used to represent an existential urge, felt by all mountaineers, to achieve a goal that is both physical and spiritual.”
Peter Gillman, Wildest Dream: The Biography of George Mallory

“My Everest is not your Everest. Your Everest is not mine. We all have an Everest. Each of us. Sometimes the peak is literally Mount Everest but most times it lies deep within us, figuratively occupying a mountainous inner space. It calls us to rise up, to do what we formerly labeled as impossible, and to be who we deeply and desperately want to be. I know that I have found an Everest when my soul furiously pokes me repeatedly until I listen. Heeding this call to passionate adventure of any sort initiates a journey of intense immense proportion that changes every molecule of my being.”
TA Loeffler

“Everest itself was the only mountain which we could see without turning our gaze downwards…”
Peter Gillman, Wildest Dream: The Biography of George Mallory

“On June 1 George told Ruth it would have been 'unbearable' to miss the final attempt. His frostbitten fingers might suffer further damage, but he declared: 'The game is worth a finger.”
Peter Gillman, Wildest Dream: The Biography of George Mallory

“Evenings were peaceful, smoke settling in the quiet air to soften the dusk, lights twinkling on the ridge we would camp on tomorrow, clouds dimming the outline of our pass for the day after. Growing excitement lured my thoughts again and again to the West Ridge….
There was loneliness, too, as the sun set, but only rarely now did doubts return. Then I felt sinkingly as if my whole life lay behind me. Once on the mountain I knew (or trusted) that this would give way to total absorption with the task at hand. But at times I wondered if I had not come a long way only to find what I really sought was something I had left behind.”
Thomas F. Hornbein

“In a letter George had recalled the death of Donald Robertson, writing of 'the great sleeping ones that have but to stir in their slumber... Do you know that sickening feeling that one can't go back and have it undone and nothing will make good?”
Peter Gillman, Wildest Dream: The Biography of George Mallory

“Everest is the highest mountain in the world, and no man has reached its summit. Its existence is a challenge. The answer is instinctive, a part, I suppose of man's desire to conquer the universe. (Quoting George Mallory)”
Peter Gillman, Wildest Dream: The Biography of George Mallory

“I suppose we go to Mount Everest, granted the opportunity, because-in a word-we can't help it.' George had written. 'Or, to state the matter differently, because we are mountaineers.”
Peter Gillman, Wildest Dream: The Biography of George Mallory

“It is of course possible to give more elaborate answers to the perennial question: why climb? In his writing and lectures, George described the spirit of adventure, confronting and managing risk, winning admiration; even, he confessed, the desire to be proclaimed a hero. His love for the wild places was manifest, as was his delight in the inner journey that accompanies an ascent.”
Peter Gillman, Wildest Dream: The Biography of George Mallory

“Their three remaining porters returned to the North Col, leaving Norton and Somervell to contemplate an awesome panorama of peaks silhouetted against the red evening sky. Somervell felt he was witnessing 'a sunset all over the world' and also had the illusion that they were camped in a field close to a wall that marked the limit of their capacities and endurance.”
Peter Gillman, Wildest Dream: The Biography of George Mallory

“Facciamo a braccetto gli ultimi passi. Siamo su. Ci abbracciamo. E’ mezzogiorno. Abbiamo raggiunto la meta dei nostri desideri, poco sotto il cielo. Oswald è completamente euforico. Grida “Siamo su, siamo su” dietro la sua maschera. Io sono felice, perché la vetta comporta anche la fine della penosa salita. La vetta significa non dover più fare nessun passo verso l'alto. Non riesco ancora ad esserne consapevole, solo le mie conoscenze mi dicono: “Questo è il punto più alto della terra”.
Scattiamo le fotografie per l'album di famiglia: io, il vincitore della vetta, io, il superuomo. Io, la creatura senza fiato, io, il Reinhard su un mucchio di neve. Pian piano realizzo il freddo, il vento, la mia stanchezza. Pian piano, dopo la gioia, viene la tristezza, viene una sensazione di vuoto: una utopia è diventata realtà. Intuisco che anche l'Everest è solo un'anticima. La vera cima non la raggiungerò mai.”
Reinhard Karl, Montagna vissuta. Tempo per respirare