Calculus Quotes

Quotes tagged as "calculus" Showing 1-30 of 39
Leonhard Euler
“Nothing takes place in the world whose meaning is not that of some maximum or minimum.”
Leonhard Euler

John Rachel
“You can't teach calculus to a chimpanzee. So just share your banana.”
John Rachel, Blinders Keepers

Terry Pratchett
“He calculated the number of bricks in the wall, first in twos and then in tens and finally in sixteens. The numbers formed up and marched past his brain in terrified obedience. Division and multiplication were discovered. Algebra was invented and provided an interesting diversion for a minute or two. And then he felt the fog of numbers drift away, and looked up and saw the sparkling, distant mountains of calculus.”
Terry Pratchett, Men at Arms

Steven H. Strogatz
“Yet in another way, calculus is fundamentally naive, almost childish in its optimism. Experience teaches us that change can be sudden, discontinuous, and wrenching. Calculus draws its power by refusing to see that. It insists on a world without accidents, where one thing leads logically to another. Give me the initial conditions and the law of motion, and with calculus I can predict the future -- or better yet, reconstruct the past. I wish I could do that now.

Steven Strogatz, The Calculus of Friendship: What a Teacher and a Student Learned about Life While Corresponding about Math

Jennifer Ouellette
“I abandoned the assigned problems in standard calculus textbooks and followed my curiosity. Wherever I happened to be--a Vegas casino, Disneyland, surfing in Hawaii, or sweating on the elliptical in Boesel's Green Microgym--I asked myself, "Where is the calculus in this experience?”
Jennifer Ouellette, The Calculus Diaries: How Math Can Help You Lose Weight, Win in Vegas, and Survive a Zombie Apocalypse

“As to the need of improvement there can be no question whilst the reign of Euclid continues. My own idea of a useful course is to begin with arithmetic, and then not Euclid but algebra. Next, not Euclid, but practical geometry, solid as well as plane; not demonstration, but to make acquaintance. Then not Euclid, but elementary vectors, conjoined with algebra, and applied to geometry. Addition first; then the scalar product. Elementary calculus should go on simultaneously, and come into vector algebraic geometry after a bit. Euclid might be an extra course for learned men, like Homer...”
Oliver Heaviside, Electromagnetic Theory

Nicolas de Condorcet
“[All phenomena] are equally susceptible of being calculated, and all that is necessary, to reduce the whole of nature to laws similar to those which Newton discovered with the aid of the calculus, is to have a sufficient number of observations and a mathematics that is complex enough.”
Marquis de Condorcet

Amit Kalantri
“What music is to the heart, mathematics is to the mind.”
Amit Kalantri, Wealth of Words

Tony Wagner
“If college admissions officers are going to encourage kids to take the same AP math class, why not statistics? Almost every career (whether in business, nonprofits, academics, law, or medicine benefits from proficiency in statistics. Being an informed, responsible citizen requires a sound knowledge of statistics, as politicians, reporters, and bloggers all rely on "data" to justify positions. [p.98]”
Tony Wagner, Most Likely to Succeed: Preparing Our Kids for the Innovation Era

Andrija Maurović
“The ultimate goal of a meteorologist is to set up differential equations of the movements of the air and to obtain, as their integral, the general atmospheric circulation, and as particular integrals the cyclones, anticyclones, tornados, and thunderstorms.”
Andrija Maurović

Thomm Quackenbush
“Being kidnapped and abused by the undead was worse than calculus, but not by a wide margin.”
Thomm Quackenbush, Danse Macabre (Night's Dream, #2)

Jennifer Ouellette
“I will never listen to ocean waves or view a beautiful sunset in quite the same way again. That is perhaps the greatest gift one can gain by delving into calculus: It is a whole new way of looking at the world, accessible only through the realm of mathematics.”
Jennifer Ouellette, The Calculus Diaries: How Math Can Help You Lose Weight, Win in Vegas, and Survive a Zombie Apocalypse

Ryan Lilly
“Leadership calculus: always choose to rise over run.”
Ryan Lilly

David Berlinski
“As its campfires glow against the dark, every culture tells stories to itself about how the gods lit up the morning sky and set the wheel of being into motion. The great scientific culture of the West--our culture--is no exception. The calculus is the story this world first told itself as it became the modern world.”
David Berlinski

“Voltaire called the calculus "the Art of numbering and measuring exactly a Thing whose Existence cannot be conceived."
See Letters Concerning the English Nation p. 152”
Carl B. Boyer, The History of the Calculus and Its Conceptual Development

“The teacher manages to get along still with the cumbersome algebraic analysis, in spite of its difficulties and imperfections, and avoids the smooth infinitesimal calculus, although the eighteenth century shyness toward it had long lost all point.”
Felix Klein, Elementary Mathematics from an Advanced Standpoint: Geometry

Rick Riordan
“I never joke about calculus homework." - Sam al-Abbas”
Rick Riordan, The Sword of Summer

Trebor Healey
“Love was actually more like calculus or physics. What was the half-life of love? Did it have cosigns and slopes, or quarks that morphed from wave to particle faster than you could say, please don’t leave?
Trebor Healey, A Horse Named Sorrow

K. Ancrum
“This book is for all of us who looked up at the sky in wonder, and then cried when we learned how much calculus separated us from the stars”
K. Ancrum, The Weight of the Stars

Amit Kalantri
“Mathematics is not just a subject of education system, it is the soul of education system.”
Amit Kalantri, Wealth of Words

Amit Kalantri
“To a scholar, mathematics is music.”
Amit Kalantri, Wealth of Words

Ahmed Djebbar
“Two writings of al-Hassār have survived. The first, entitled Kitāb al-bayān wa t-tadhkār [Book of proof and recall] is a handbook of calculation treating numeration, arithmetical operations on whole numbers and on fractions, extraction of the exact or approximate square root of a whole of fractionary number and summation of progressions of whole numbers (natural, even or odd), and of their squares and cubes. Despite its classical content in relation to the Arab mathematical tradition, this book occupies a certain important place in the history of mathematics in North Africa for three reasons: in the first place, and notwithstanding the development of research, this manual remains the most ancient work of calculation representing simultaneously the tradition of the Maghrib and that of Muslim Spain. In the second place, this book is the first wherein one has found a symbolic writing of fractions, which utilises the horizontal bar and the dust ciphers i.e. the ancestors of the digits that we use today (and which are, for certain among them, almost identical to ours) [Woepcke 1858-59: 264-75; Zoubeidi 1996]. It seems as a matter of fact that the utilisation of the fraction bar was very quickly generalised in the mathematical teaching in the Maghrib, which could explain that Fibonacci (d. after 1240) had used in his Liber Abbaci, without making any particular remark about it [Djebbar 1980 : 97-99; Vogel 1970-80]. Thirdly, this handbook is the only Maghribian work of calculation known to have circulated in the scientific foyers of south Europe, as Moses Ibn Tibbon realised, in 1271, a Hebrew translation.
[Mathematics in the Medieval Maghrib: General Survey on Mathematical Activities in North Africa]”
Ahmed Djebbar

“Most of his predecessors had considered the differential calculus as bound up with geometry, but Euler made the subject a formal theory of functions which had no need to revert to diagrams or geometrical conceptions.”
Carl B. Boyer, The History of the Calculus and Its Conceptual Development

“Carnot, one of a school of mathematicians who emphasized the relationship of mathematics to scientific practice, appears, in spite of the title of his work, to have been more concerned about the facility of application of the rules of procedure than about the logical reasoning involved.”
Carl B. Boyer, The History of the Calculus and Its Conceptual Development

“Cournot protested that concepts exist in the understanding, independently of the definition which one gives to them. Simple ideas sometimes have complicated definitions, or even none. For this reason he felt that one should not subordinate the precision of such ideas as those of speed or the infinitely small to logical definition. This point of view is diametrically opposed to that which analysis since the time of Cournot has been toward ever-greater care in the formal logical elaboration of the subject. This trend, initiated in the first half of the nineteenth century and fostered largely by Cauchy, was in the second half of that century continued with notable success by Weierstrass.”
Carl B. Boyer, The History of the Calculus and Its Conceptual Development

“In making the basis of the calculus more rigorously formal, Weierstrass also attacked the appeal to intuition of continuous motion which is implied in Cauchy's expression -- that a variable approaches a limit.”
Carl B. Boyer, The History of the Calculus and Its Conceptual Development

“Thus the required rigor was found in the application of the concept of number, made formal by divorcing it from the idea of geometrical quantity”
Carl B. Boyer, The History of the Calculus and Its Conceptual Development

“Mathematics is unable to specify whether motion is continuous, for it deals merely with hypothetical relations and can make its variable continuous or discontinuous at will. The paradoxes of Zeno are consequences of the failure to appreciate this fact and of the resulting lack of a precise specification of the problem. The former is a matter of scientific description a posteriori, whereas the latter is a matter solely of mathematical definition a priori. The former may consequently suggest that motion be defined mathematically in terms of continuous variable, but cannot, because of the limitations of sensory perception, prove that it must be so defined.”
Carl B. Boyer, The History of the Calculus and Its Conceptual Development

“The mathematical theory of continuity is based, not on intuition, but on the logically developed theories of number and sets of points.”
Carl B. Boyer, The History of the Calculus and Its Conceptual Development

René Guénon
“Be that as it may, Leibnitz was never able to explain the principles of his calculus clearly, and this shows that there was something in it that was beyond him, something that was as it were imposed upon him without his being conscious of it; had he taken this into account, he most certainly would not have engaged in any dispute over ‘priority’ with Newton. Besides, these sorts of disputes are always completely vain, for ideas, insofar as they are true, are not the property of anyone, despite what modern ‘individualism’ might have to say; it is only error that can properly be attributed to human individuals.”
René Guénon, The Metaphysical Principles of the Infinitesimal Calculus

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