Jennifer Ouellette





Jennifer Ouellette



Jennifer Ouellette is the author of The Calculus Diaries: How Math Can Help You Lose Weight, Win in Vegas, and Survive a Zombie Apocalypse, due out August 31, 2010. She is also the author of The Physics of the Buffyverse (2007) and Black Bodies and Quantum Cats: Tales from the Annals of Physics (2006), both published by Penguin. Her work has appeared in The Washington Post, Discover, New Scientist, Salon, Symmetry, Nature, and Physics Today, among other venues. She blogs at Discovery News, and maintains the group science blog Cocktail Party Physics.

"


Average rating: 3.61 · 1,466 ratings · 231 reviews · 6 distinct works · Similar authors
The Calculus Diaries: How M...

3.36 avg rating — 470 ratings — published 2010 — 9 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Me, Myself, and Why: Search...

3.57 avg rating — 412 ratings — published 2014 — 5 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Black Bodies and Quantum Ca...

by
3.85 avg rating — 248 ratings — published 2005 — 11 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Physics of the Buffyverse

3.70 avg rating — 227 ratings — published 2006 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Best Science Writing On...

by
4.21 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 2012 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Best Science Writing On...

by
4.02 avg rating — 95 ratings — published 2012 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Jennifer Ouellette…

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“I think scientists have a valid point when they bemoan the fact that it's socially acceptable in our culture to be utterly ignorant of math, whereas it is a shameful thing to be illiterate.”
Jennifer Ouellette, The Calculus Diaries: How Math Can Help You Lose Weight, Win in Vegas, and Survive a Zombie Apocalypse

“... I succeeded at math, at least by the usual evaluation criteria: grades. Yet while I might have earned top marks in geometry and algebra, I was merely following memorized rules, plugging in numbers and dutifully crunching out answers by rote, with no real grasp of the significance of what I was doing or its usefulness in solving real-world problems. Worse, I knew the depth of my own ignorance, and I lived in fear that my lack of comprehension would be discovered and I would be exposed as an academic fraud -- psychologists call this "imposter syndrome".”
Jennifer Ouellette, The Calculus Diaries: How Math Can Help You Lose Weight, Win in Vegas, and Survive a Zombie Apocalypse

“I abandoned the assigned problems in standard calculus textbooks and followed my curiosity. Wherever I happened to be--a Vegas casino, Disneyland, surfing in Hawaii, or sweating on the elliptical in Boesel's Green Microgym--I asked myself, "Where is the calculus in this experience?”
Jennifer Ouellette, The Calculus Diaries: How Math Can Help You Lose Weight, Win in Vegas, and Survive a Zombie Apocalypse



Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite Jennifer to Goodreads.