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Where the Crawdad...
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by Delia Owens (Goodreads Author)
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Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens
Where the Crawdads Sing
by Delia Owens (Goodreads Author)
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Play Bigger by Al Ramadan
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I’m not a big fan of business / marketing books, but this is worth the effort. Takes a big idea a handful of hugely successful people have been able to intuit, and turns it into an actionable approach. Important for most enterprise tech execs, who I ...more
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Play Bigger by Al Ramadan
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The Sum of Small Things by Elizabeth Currid-Halkett
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Pachinko by Min Jin Lee
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In the end, your belly was your emperor.
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Pachinko by Min Jin Lee
Pachinko
by Min Jin Lee
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Deeply personal, intergenerational story. Sad, sincere, spare. Beautiful book.
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Play Bigger by Al Ramadan
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Pachinko by Min Jin Lee
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by Min Jin Lee
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Michael made a comment on his status in Ishmael
Ishmael by Daniel Quinn
" Kewl. A friend felt the same! "
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Ishmael by Daniel Quinn
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Thomas Piketty
“In 1910, capital inequality there was very high, though still markedly lower than in Europe: the top decile owned about 80 percent of total wealth and the top centile around 45 percent (see Figure 10.5). Interestingly, the fact that inequality in the New World seemed to be catching up with inequality in old Europe greatly worried US economists at the time. Willford King’s book on the distribution of wealth in the United States in 1915—the first broad study of the question—is particularly illuminating in this regard.13 From today’s perspective, this may seem surprising: we have been accustomed for several decades now to the fact that the United States is more inegalitarian than Europe and even that many Americans are proud of the fact (often arguing that inequality is a prerequisite of entrepreneurial dynamism and decrying Europe as a sanctuary of Soviet-style egalitarianism). A century ago, however, both the perception and the reality were strictly the opposite: it was obvious to everyone that the New World was by nature less inegalitarian than old Europe, and this difference was also a subject of pride.”
Thomas Piketty, Capital in the Twenty-First Century