Siddharth

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The Scarlet Letter
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The Black Swan: T...
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  (page 307 of 444)
"I have completed the main part of the book. I am yet to read the Post script essay. This book has given me several pieces of related literature to read and a treasure trove of ideas to process! It's a really good book! (His humor also plays a part in the assessment!)" Jan 28, 2018 02:22AM

 

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The Feminine Mystique by Betty Friedan
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The Essential Interviews by Bob Dylan
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Tarantula by Bob Dylan
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Chronicles, Vol. 1 by Bob Dylan
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Streampunks by Robert Kyncl
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Why We Snap by R. Douglas Fields
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On Anarchism by Noam Chomsky
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The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
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Requiem for a Dream by Hubert Selby Jr.
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More of Siddharth's books…
Nassim Nicholas Taleb
“Learn to read history, get all the knowledge you can, do not frown on the anecdote, but do not draw any causal links, do not try to reverse engineer too much -- but if you do, do not make big scientific claims.”
Nassim Nicholas Taleb, The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable

Dante Gabriel Rossetti
“Love, which is quickly kindled in the gentle heart, seized this man for the fair form that was taken from me, the manner still hurts me. Love which absolves no beloved one from loving, seized me so strongly with his charm that, as thou seest, it does not leave me yet”
Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Pre-Raphaelite Poetry: An Anthology

Vladimir Nabokov
“Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul. Lo-lee-ta: the tip of the tongue taking a trip of three steps down the palate to tap, at three, on the teeth. Lo. Lee. Ta. She was Lo, plain Lo, in the morning, standing four feet ten in one sock. She was Lola in slacks. She was Dolly at school. She was Dolores on the dotted line. But in my arms she was always Lolita. Did she have a precursor? She did, indeed she did. In point of fact, there might have been no Lolita at all had I not loved, one summer, an initial girl-child. In a princedom by the sea. Oh when? About as many years before Lolita was born as my age was that summer. You can always count on a murderer for a fancy prose style. Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, exhibit number one is what the seraphs, the misinformed, simple, noble-winged seraphs, envied. Look at this tangle of thorns.”
Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita

Christina Rossetti
“Better by far you should forget and smile than that you should remember and be sad”
Christina Rossetti, Pre-Raphaelite Poetry: An Anthology

Karl R. Popper
“The so-called paradox of freedom is the argument that freedom in the sense of absence of any constraining control must lead to very great restraint, since it makes the bully free to enslave the meek. The idea is, in a slightly different form, and with very different tendency, clearly expressed in Plato.

Less well known is the paradox of tolerance: Unlimited tolerance must lead to the disappearance of tolerance. If we extend unlimited tolerance even to those who are intolerant, if we are not prepared to defend a tolerant society against the onslaught of the intolerant, then the tolerant will be destroyed, and tolerance with them. — In this formulation, I do not imply, for instance, that we should always suppress the utterance of intolerant philosophies; as long as we can counter them by rational argument and keep them in check by public opinion, suppression would certainly be unwise. But we should claim the right to suppress them if necessary even by force; for it may easily turn out that they are not prepared to meet us on the level of rational argument, but begin by denouncing all argument; they may forbid their followers to listen to rational argument, because it is deceptive, and teach them to answer arguments by the use of their fists or pistols. We should therefore claim, in the name of tolerance, the right not to tolerate the intolerant. We should claim that any movement preaching intolerance places itself outside the law, and we should consider incitement to intolerance and persecution as criminal, in the same way as we should consider incitement to murder, or to kidnapping, or to the revival of the slave trade, as criminal.”
Karl R. Popper, The Open Society and Its Enemies

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