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Assemblage Theory
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Life in Code: A P...
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Assemblage Theory by Manuel Delanda
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Life in Code by Ellen Ullman
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Breaking Smart by Venkatesh Rao
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Prediction Machines by ajay agrawal
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Shōgun by James Clavell
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The Calculus Story by David Acheson
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The Origins of Knowledge and Imagination by Jacob Bronowski
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Inadequate Equilibria by Eliezer Yudkowsky
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The World Beyond Your Head by Matthew B. Crawford
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Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert
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More of Alan's books…
“Interaction Design is the creation of a dialogue between a person and a product, system, or service. This dialogue is both physical and emotional in nature and is manifested in the interplay between form, function, and technology as experienced over time.”
Jon Kolko, Thoughts on Interaction Design

“THINK OF THE WAY a stretch of grass becomes a road. At first, the stretch is bumpy and difficult to drive over. A crew comes along and flattens the surface, making it easier to navigate. Then, someone pours gravel. Then tar. Then a layer of asphalt. A steamroller smooths it; someone paints lines. The final surface is something an automobile can traverse quickly. Gravel stabilizes, tar solidifies, asphalt reinforces, and now we don’t need to build our cars to drive over bumpy grass. And we can get from Philadelphia to Chicago in a single day. That’s what computer programming is like. Like a highway, computers are layers on layers of code that make them increasingly easy to use. Computer scientists call this abstraction. A microchip—the brain of a computer, if you will—is made of millions of little transistors, each of whose job is to turn on or off, either letting electricity flow or not. Like tiny light switches, a bunch of transistors in a computer might combine to say, “add these two numbers,” or “make this part of the screen glow.” In the early days, scientists built giant boards of transistors, and manually switched them on and off as they experimented with making computers do interesting things. It was hard work (and one of the reasons early computers were enormous). Eventually, scientists got sick of flipping switches and poured a layer of virtual gravel that let them control the transistors by punching in 1s and 0s. 1 meant “on” and 0 meant “off.” This abstracted the scientists from the physical switches. They called the 1s and 0s machine language. Still, the work was agonizing. It took lots of 1s and 0s to do just about anything. And strings of numbers are really hard to stare at for hours. So, scientists created another abstraction layer, one that could translate more scrutable instructions into a lot of 1s and 0s. This was called assembly language and it made it possible that a machine language instruction that looks like this: 10110000 01100001 could be written more like this: MOV AL, 61h which looks a little less robotic. Scientists could write this code more easily. Though if you’re like me, it still doesn’t look fun. Soon, scientists engineered more layers, including a popular language called C, on top of assembly language, so they could type in instructions like this: printf(“Hello World”); C translates that into assembly language, which translates into 1s and 0s, which translates into little transistors popping open and closed, which eventually turn on little dots on a computer screen to display the words, “Hello World.” With abstraction, scientists built layers of road which made computer travel faster. It made the act of using computers faster. And new generations of computer programmers didn’t need to be actual scientists. They could use high-level language to make computers do interesting things.* When you fire up a computer, open up a Web browser, and buy a copy of this book online for a friend (please do!), you’re working within a program, a layer that translates your actions into code that another layer, called an operating system (like Windows or Linux or MacOS), can interpret. That operating system is probably built on something like C, which translates to Assembly, which translates to machine language, which flips on and off a gaggle of transistors. (Phew.) So, why am I telling you this? In the same way that driving on pavement makes a road trip faster, and layers of code let you work on a computer faster, hackers like DHH find and build layers of abstraction in business and life that allow them to multiply their effort. I call these layers platforms.”
Shane Snow, Smartcuts: How Hackers, Innovators, and Icons Accelerate Success

“Interaction Designers, however, are required to balance issues of form with issues of time: An interaction occurs in the fourth dimension, and simply attending to aesthetics does not take into account the unfolding experience that a user has with a product.”
Jon Kolko, Thoughts on Interaction Design

“In many ways, the role of design in a corporation has shifted dramatically from one of craftsmanship—making artifacts—to one of facilitation—or driving an agenda. Designers find themselves operating in a space between project manager and consensus driver—and that's not a particularly creative or invigorating place to be. For those who end up in this role, the following may offer guidance to rekindle the creative embers that are beginning to burn out.”
Jon Kolko, Thoughts on Interaction Design

“We shall have to stop thinking of technology as something invulnerable that is merely used by humans, and view it as part of a greater cybernetic ecology all around us. The key distinction in an environment is not between ‘natural’ and ‘artificial’, but between semantic and dynamic: intention and behaviour. Biology has already drawn these lines, and through us, it will integrate the inanimate with the animate in information systems, until we no longer see a pertinent difference between the two.”
Mark Burgess, In Search of Certainty: The Science of Our Information Infrastructure

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