Trivia Quotes

Quotes tagged as "trivia" (showing 1-30 of 32)
Chuck Palahniuk
“Game shows are designed to make us feel better about the random, useless facts that are all we have left of our education.”
Chuck Palahniuk, Invisible Monsters

Chuck Palahniuk
“Most of the laugh tracks on television were recorded in the early 1950’s. These days, most of the people you hear laughing are dead.”
Chuck Palahniuk

Molly Harper
“The brain may die, but my compulsion for useless trivia lives on.”
Molly Harper, Nice Girls Don't Have Fangs

Molly Harper
“Trivia monologue. You are so the man for me.”
Molly Harper, Nice Girls Don't Have Fangs

Bill Bryson
“If a potato can produce vitamin C, why can't we? Within the animal kingdom only humans and guinea pigs are unable to synthesize vitamin C in their own bodies. Why us and guinea pigs? No point asking. Nobody knows.”
Bill Bryson, At Home: A Short History of Private Life

Vera Nazarian
“Science is an organized pursuit of triviality.

Art is a casual pursuit of significance.

Let's keep it in perspective.”
Vera Nazarian, The Perpetual Calendar of Inspiration

Dean Cavanagh
“Death by Trivial Pursuits”
Dean Cavanagh
tags: trivia

Elaine Ostrach Chaika
“Trivia are not knowledge. Lists of facts don't comprise knowledge. Analyzing, hypothesizing, concluding from data, sharing insights, those comprise knowledge. You can't google for knowledge.”
Elaine Chaika

Bill Bryson
“Part of the reason people could eat so well was that many foods that we now think of as delicacies were plenteous then. Lobsters bred in such abundance around Britain's coastline that they were fed to prisoners and orphans or ground up for fertilizer.”
Bill Bryson, At Home: A Short History of Private Life

Bill Bryson
“Vitamin B proved to be not one vitamin but several, which is why we have B1, B2, and so on. To add to the confusion, Vitamin K has nothing to do with an alphabetical sequence. It was called K because its Danish discoverer, Henrik Dam, dubbed it "koagulations viatmin" for its role in blood clotting.”
Bill Bryson, At Home: A Short History of Private Life

Toba Beta
“There is no trivia in a strategic mind.”
Toba Beta, Master of Stupidity

Bill Bryson
“A plumped feather bed may have looked divine, but occupants quickly found themselves sinking into a hard, airless fissure between billowy hills. Support was on a lattice of ropes, which could be tightened with a key when they began to sag (hence the expression "sleep tight").”
Bill Bryson, At Home: A Short History of Private Life

“Sence and Sensibility, for instance, came out in three separate volumes, as did Pride and Prejudice (so the next time you read one of the ubiquitous time-travel Austen adaptations and somebody picks up a single-volume first edition, you can hit your nerd buzzer and say "wrong!").”
Amy Smith, All Roads Lead to Austen: A Yearlong Journey with Jane

Dawn Flemington
“...Makeup is for women. It's the law of nature for them to doll themselves up to get a man."
"On the contrary. [...] In the natural world, it is the male of the species who is adorned with colors to attract, impress and keep his potential mate.”
Dawn Flemington, Hometown Secrets

“When there is no news, we will give it to you with the same emphasis as if there were.”
David Brinkley

Molly Harper
“I poked him in the chest. 'First of all, yes, it was. Lacy cards and love tokens were widely exchanged even in Victorian times. By now, you should know better than to screw with me on historical trivia.”
Molly Harper, Nice Girls Don't Date Dead Men

“In high school, we barely brushed against Ogden Nash, Lewis Carroll, Edward Lear, or any of the other so-unserious writers who delight everyone they touch. This was, after all, a very expensive and important school. Instead, I was force-fed a few of Shakespeare's Greatest Hits, although the English needed translation, the broad comedy and wrenching drama were lost, and none of the magnificently dirty jokes were ever explained. (Incidentally, Romeo and Juliet, fully appreciated, might be banned in some U.S. states.) This was the Concordance again, and little more. So we'd read all the lines aloud, resign ourselves to a ponderous struggle, and soon give up the plot completely.”
Bob Harris, Prisoner of Trebekistan: A Decade in Jeopardy!

Hari Kumar K
“Ansar is an Arabic term that means helpers or supporters. They were the citizens of Medina who helped Prophet Mohammed upon His arrival to the Holy city. While 'Hussain' is a derivation of 'Hassan' that means 'GOOD' (I also owe this one to Khaled Hosseini).
That's how my favorite character in my debut novel 'When Strangers meet..' gets his name... HUSSAIN ANSARI, because he is the one who helps Jai realize the truth in the story and inspires his son, Arshad, to have FAITH in Allah.”
K. Hari Kumar, When Strangers meet..

“I do not think he (Chester Arthur) knows anything. He can quote a verse from poetry or a page from Dickens or Thackeray, but these are only leaves springing from a root out of dry ground. His vital forces are not fed,and very soon he has given out his all.”
Harriet Blaine

“The idea of a sandwich as a snack goes back to Roman times. Scandinavians perfected the technique with the Danish open-faced sandwich, or smorroebrod, consisting of thinly sliced, buttered bread and many delectable toppings.”
DeeDee Stovel, Picnic: 125 Recipes with 29 Seasonal Menus

“The time you save is just what makes the difference between trivia and culture.”
James Herron

“Education is one of the Grand Christianson Obsessions. They’ve been whole years my mother’s kept us home for intensive private study. As a result of that, Paul will perform the first brain transplant, James will someday build a bridge across the Atlantic Ocean, Charlie – who is an actual musical genius – will probably end up writing the Great American Symphony, and I – I know a little bit about a lot of things.
I can tell you the chemical composition of the stuff your stick in your hair; how long it would take you, at just under the speed of light, to get to Alpha Centauri – and how old your body would be when you finally got there; the middle name of the third president of the United States; the amount of the present budget deficit; the author of the Brothers Karamazov, and how many feet there are in a line of trochaic heptameter. The Little Girl Who Had to Know Why, Paul used to call me. But even my mother couldn’t reconcile me and math.”
Kristen D. Randle, The Only Alien on the Planet

“As Earl Rognvald of Orkney in in the Orkenyinga Saga (1200 AD) tells us: "I can play at Tafi, Nine skills I know, Rarely I forget the Runes, I know of Books and Smithing, I know how to slide on skis, Shoot and row well enough, Each of the Two arts I know, Harp playing and speaking poetry.”
Earl Rognvald

Ken Jennings
“So maybe we never would have realized we were so compatible if we hadn't been trading song lyrics and movie dialogue. That's textbook trivia right there."
Mindy looks unconvinced. "But that's how *everybody* gets together. They find some dumb thing they both know a little about that they can talk about until the waiter brings dinner. According to you, there probably isn't a marriage or a relationship or a friendship anywhere today that wasn't jump-started by trivia."
"I think that's exactly right," I agree. "To trivia.”
Ken Jennings, Brainiac: Adventures in the Curious, Competitive, Compulsive World of Trivia Buffs

Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“Though you can get smart from reading everything that a smart person writes, you cannot get famous from reading about everything that a famous person does or is said to have done.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana, N for Nigger: Aphorisms for Grown Children and Childish Grown-ups

James Ponti
“I mean it, guys," I said. "Why don't you play Two Foot Trivia instead? It's just as fun and much safer."
"First of all, this is completely safe," Grayson replied. "Second, if we had both feet down, we'd just be asking each other trivia questions."
"Which would be lame," added Alex.
"But isn't that what you're doing right now?" I asked.
"No," Grayson said defensively. "Balancing on one foot makes it a sport.”
James Ponti, Blue Moon

“Appeasement was a policy put in place by Neville Chamberlain, the British Prime Minister to try to avert war. His theory was that trying to prevent Germany from getting what it wanted would cause more harm than good in the long run. Therefore Britain’s official foreign policy would be that they would fulfill Germany’s wishes, “provided they appeared legitimate and were not enforced with violence,” described in German newspaper Der Spiegel. Chamberlain was aware that the British Empire’s resources were limited and that they really didn’t have the power to stop Hitler. So cooperating with them seemed like a better option.”
Bill O'Neill, The World War 2 Trivia Book: Interesting Stories and Random Facts from the Second World War

“The British air force desperately needed planes for their military, and the US had lots of planes but couldn’t sell them to the British, because that would count as selling weapons to a country at war. So, the States enlisted the help of their neighbors, Britain’s colony Canada. American pilots flew their planes to the border between Canada and the United States, which was mostly farmland, and landed them in the fields, and left them there. Then overnight Canadian pilots would cross down into the States and tow the planes north into Canadian lands.”
Bill O'Neill, The World War 2 Trivia Book: Interesting Stories and Random Facts from the Second World War

“In 1935, a British engineer named Robert Watson Watt was asked whether it was possible that the Germans were developing a death ray using radio waves. No such weapon was being made, but in studying the possibility, Watt ended up creating a radar detector, one of the biggest technological advances of WWII.”
Bill O'Neill, The World War 2 Trivia Book: Interesting Stories and Random Facts from the Second World War

Nicholson Baker
“Used with care, substances that harm neural tissue, such as alcohol, can aid intelligence: you corrode the chromium, giggly, crossword puzzle-solving parts of your mind with pain and poison, forcing the neurons to take responsibility for themselves and those around them, toughening themselves against the accelerated wear of these artificial solvents. After a night of poison. your brain wakes up in the morning saying, “No, I don't give a shit who introduced the sweet potato into North America.”
Nicholson Baker, The Mezzanine

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