Ww2 Quotes

Quotes tagged as "ww2" Showing 1-30 of 181
Steven Moffat
“The Doctor: Amazing.
Nancy: What is?
The Doctor: 1941. Right now, not very far from here, the German war machine is rolling up the map of Europe. Country after country, falling like dominoes. Nothing can stop it, nothing. Until one tiny, damp little island says "No. No, not here." A mouse in front of a lion. You're amazing, the lot of you. I don't know what you do to Hitler, but you frighten the hell out of me.”
Steven Moffat

Heinrich Heine
“Where they burn books, at the end they also burn people”
Heinrich Heine

Anthony Doerr
“A girl got kicked out of the swimming hole today. Inge Hachmann. They said they wouldn’t let us swim with a half-breed. Unsanitary. A half-breed, Werner. Aren’t we half-breeds too? Aren’t we half our mother, half our father?”
Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See

“War was funny like that: one minute you could try and block it and have the most wonderful thoughts, the next you were back in the nightmare.”
Mark A. Cooper, The Edelweiss Express

David Benioff
“‎I was cursed with the pessimism of both the Russians and the Jews two of the gloomiest tribes in the world. Still if there wasn't greatness in me maybe I had the talent to recognize it in others even in the most irritating others.”
David Benioff, City of Thieves

Denis Avey
“The mind is a powerful thing. It can take you through walls.”
Denis Avey, The Man Who Broke Into Auschwitz: A True Story of World War II

David Benioff
“That is the way we decided to talk, free and easy, two young men discussing a boxing match. That was the only way to talk. You couldn't let too much truth seep into your conversation, you couldn't admit with your mouth what your eyes had seen. If you opened the door even a centimeter, you would smell the rot outside and hear the screams. You did not open the door. You kept your mind on the tasks of the day, the hunt for food and water and something to burn, and you saved the rest for the end of the war.”
David Benioff, City of Thieves

Denis Avey
“They say 'stone walls do not a prison make nor iron bars a cage'. It was a quotation I knew as a boy. I had made it my own back then. I knew they couldn't capture my mind. Whilst I could still think, I was free.”
Denis Avey, The Man Who Broke Into Auschwitz: A True Story of World War II

Joyce Shaughnessy
“After months of rumors, inference, and horrible miscalculations, the impossible had happened. The U.S. Pacific fleet lay twisted anad burning at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean in Honolulu. Had he been wrong about Japan not taking an offensive right now? God, he had thousands of men and women to think of, and he feared in his heart that it might not turn out the way he had seen it. He felt doomed, almost paralyzed by his gross miscalculation. He determined, however, that he would not let the word out about Pearl Harbor until he could meet with his American strategists and Philippine President Manuel Quezon.”
Joyce Shaughnessy, Blessed Are the Merciful

“It was now December 7, 1941; the date that Franklin D. Roosevelt was destined to declare would live in infamy.”
Randall Wallace, Pearl Harbor

Timothy James Dean
I was on one of my world 'walkabouts.' It had taken me once more through Hong Kong, to Japan, Australia, and then Papua New Guinea in the South Pacific [one of the places I grew up]. There I found the picture of 'the Father.' It was a real, gigantic Saltwater Crocodile (whose picture is now featured on page 1 of TEETH).

From that moment, 'the Father' began to swim through the murky recesses of my mind. Imagine! I thought, men confronting the world’s largest reptile on its own turf! And what if they were stripped of their firearms, so they must face this force of nature with nothing but hand weapons and wits?

We know that neither whales nor sharks hunt individual humans for weeks on end. But, Dear Reader, crocodiles do! They are intelligent predators that choose their victims and plot their attacks. So, lost on its river, how would our heroes escape a great hunter of the Father’s magnitude? And what if these modern men must also confront the headhunters and cannibals who truly roam New Guinea?

What of tribal wars, the coming of Christianity and materialism (the phenomenon known as the 'Cargo Cult'), and the people’s introduction to 'civilization' in the form of world war? What of first contact between pristine tribal culture and the outside world? What about tribal clashes on a global scale—the hatred and enmity between America and Japan, from Pearl Harbor, to the only use in history of atomic weapons? And if the world could find peace at last, how about Johnny and Katsu?”
Timothy James Dean, Teeth

Denis Avey
“Ernie got it,' I said afterwards. 'His experience taught him that you've got to fight for what's right. It gets you into a lot of trouble but he came to the same conclusion as me.' People think it could never happen here. Don't you believe it; it doesn't take much.”
Denis Avey, The Man Who Broke Into Auschwitz: A True Story of World War II

Stuart Finlay
“All the nut eaters and food faddists I have ever known, died early after a long period of senile decay - Winston Churchill”
Stuart Finlay, What Churchill Would Do

Steen Langstrup
“That’s war. It won’t let anyone get away unscathed. I’m sorry about Grete.”

Verner aka ‘Jens’
in the novel 'the Informer' by Steen Langstrup”
Steen Langstrup, The Informer

Irène Némirovsky
“Après tout, on ne juge le monde que d'après son propre coeur. L'avare seul voit les gens menés par l'intérêt, le luxurieux par l'obsession du désir. Pour Madame Angellier, un Allemand n'était pas un homme, c'était une personnification de la cruauté, de la perversité et de la haine. Que d'autres eussent un jugement différent était impossible, invraisemblable... Elle ne pouvait pas plus se répresenter Lucile amoureuse d'un Allemand qu'elle n'eût imaginé l'accouplement d'une femme et d'une bête fabuleuse, comme la licorne, le dragon ou la tarasque.”
Irène Némirovsky, Suite Française

Miles Watson
“Bloke was a savage. On the pitch and in the sky. But his savagery wouldn't save him. He had flown too many missions and the numbers would catch up with him soon. They always did.”
Miles Watson, The Numbers Game

Miles Watson
“Halleck came from people who regarded a slight change of facial expression as adequate to convey the pain of a severed limb.”
Miles Watson, Sinner's Cross

Miles Watson
“This cramped little space that stank of earth and smoke and sweat, that dripped water during every hard rain, and whose floor was often a half-frozen soup of mud and sunflower seeds and straw, now seemed to him more comfortable than Ketterling’s HQ could ever be, and he knew why. Here, surrounded by the weapons hanging from nails by their straps, the boxes of hand grenades, the cut-down artillery shells filled with cigarette butts, the crumpled moisture-bloated magazines and greasy playing cards, one lived an honest life. You couldn’t get that back home anymore. The radio and the newspapers were full of lies that would have been insulting even if the streets hadn’t been full of rubble and the air with the shriek of air-raid sirens, and it wasn’t enough for the government that the people merely endure it all, bombs and lies, without objecting. They had to believe the lies, had to parrot them back with sickly smiles plastered on their faces, lest they be branded defeatists and be taken away.

It wasn’t like that here. Nickolaus wanted it to be, but it wasn’t. Here, a man might be hungry, he might itch with lice, he might sting with pain from cuts that never healed, he might be empty-headed with fatigue and half-deafened from noise, but he always knew precisely where he stood—with his comrades and with the enemy. There were no intrigues, no politics, no flag-waving. A man never looked you in the eyes and told you black was white, or worse yet, demanded that you agree that black was white. There was no need because he had already asked you to die for him, and once you had agreed, what need was there for words?”
Miles Watson, Sinner's Cross

Miles Watson
“We’ve been catching hell ever since we got to this forest. Christ, I’ve heard guys praying they’ll lose a leg just to get out of here. That’s not normal. I mean, you hear guys praying to get a Million Dollar Wound all the time—you know, lose a finger or a toe or get shot through the ass. Something that’ll fuck ‘em up bad enough to get ‘em sent home but not bad enough to cripple ‘em. That’s normal. I been hearing that since Anzio. But I never heard anybody pray to lose a fucking leg. Not before I came here.”
Miles Watson, Sinner's Cross

Miles Watson
“This is your platoon sergeant, Halleck. This is your platoon medic, Holzinger. This is your radioman, Loomis, and this is your call-sign, Decoy Red One Six. These are your squad leaders—Ryerson, Spicer, and Keesey. Tonight’s password is 'Ontario.' Your position extends from the edge of that gully to the blowdown over there. We don’t expect a push here, so your job is to keep the Germans from infiltrating. That means a one hundred percent alert all night, every night. Listen for the enemy. Don’t make any noise at all or you’ll take fire from both sides. Don’t smoke, the Germans will see the light and blow you to hell. Don’t fall asleep, you’ll wake up with your throat cut. Don’t give any orders, you don’t know what you’re doing. Let Halleck run things until you know the score. A guide will relieve you at 0630 hours exactly. If you hear anyone come up behind you before that, shoot him.”
Miles Watson, Sinner's Cross

Miles Watson
“A good platoon sergeant, in the lieutenant’s mind, ought act like Kato on 'The Green Hornet' and not a disapproving uncle with a taste for the strap.”
Miles Watson, Sinner's Cross

Irène Némirovsky
“Elle variait ses hallucinations à son gré. Elle ne se contentait pas du passé; elle escomptait l'avenir! Elle changeait le présent selon sa volonté; elle mentait et se trompait elle-même, mais comme ses mensonges étaient ses propres oeuvres, elle les chérissait. Pour de brefs instants, elle était heureuse. Il n'y avait plus à son bonheur ces limites imposées par le réel. Tout était possible, tout était à sa portée. D'abord, la guerre était finie.”
Irène Némirovsky, Suite Française

“Folk ser ud til at forlade udstillingen fulde af indtryk, og på gaden fortsætter de i lang tid med at diskutere de forskellige tegninger og projekter. Alle nægter at tro, at sådanne værker kan laves inden for ghettoens mure, især under de nuværende forhold med konstante menneskejagter, sult, epidemier og terror. Og dog er det tilfældet! Vores ungdom har givet håndgribelige beviser på sit mod og sin åndelig styrke, modstandskraft og tro på en ny og mere retfærdig verden.”
Mary Berg, The Diary of Mary Berg: Growing up in the Warsaw Ghetto

Anna Louise Strong
“All Russians I knew hoped passionately that, with Hitler beaten, the War allies might continue friendship into long years of peace. They knew, of course - they had known all through the war - that there were elements in America that sabotaged the alliance, and even some who would rather see Hitler win. For two years while Russians perished by millions, they had watched their Allies delay the promised "second front" in the west.”
Anna Louise Strong, The Stalin Era

Anna Louise Strong
“Month after month, the Russians, bearing the brunt of war, had waited. The Anglo-American landing did not come until June 6, 1944, when the Russian army had already liberated most of the USSR and was driving across Poland. Many Russians had bitterly wondered whether the Allies delayed so that Russia might take the loss, and landed at last in Normandy because they could not afford to let Russians take Berlin alone.”
Anna Louise Strong, The Stalin Era

Garth Ennis
“It was terrible to watch one of those things die. Eighteen tons, a hundred feet from wingtip to wingtip, ten men aboard, all fighting to get out. If she spun, the centrifugal force would pin them to the walls... You're trapped inside a metal box. You've got five miles to fall. You know it. [...] Sometimes you could hear them all the way.”
Garth Ennis, Dreaming Eagles

Sherri L. Smith
“Time should not embarrass itself by moving forward, bringing only pale imitations of a perfect night.”
Sherri L. Smith, The Blossom and the Firefly
tags: japan, ww2

“Even the rats were giving up on the British Empire'.
-p39- Elephant Moon”
John Sweeney

Éric Vuillard
“Don't believe for a minute that this all belongs to some distant past. These are not antediluvian monsters, creatures who pitifully faded away in the 1950s along with the poverty depicted by Rossellini, or were carted off with the ruins of Berlin. These names still exist. Their fortunes are enormous.”
Éric Vuillard, L'Ordre du jour

Filip Dewinter
“My father was taken away during the Second World War as a work refusal. He had gone into hiding after the university in Leuven was closed, but was nevertheless caught and imprisoned by the Germans in the Bruges prison. He was eventually put to work as a forced laborer in a factory in Hamburg.”
Filip Dewinter

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