Sikh Quotes

Quotes tagged as "sikh" (showing 1-15 of 15)
Guru Nanak
“Even kings and emperors, with mountains of property and oceans of wealth - these are not even equal to an ant, who does not forget God.”
Guru Nanak, Sri Guru Granth Sahib

“I do not need to understand words to know he is disappointed I am not a boy. Some things need no translation. And I know, because my body remembers without benefit of words, that men who do not welcome girl-babies will not treasure me as I grow to woman - though he call me princess just because the Guru told him to.

I have come so far, I have borne so much pain and emptiness!

But men have not yet changed.”
Shauna Singh Baldwin, What the Body Remembers

“...Of the Hindu, of whatever caste, it may be said, as of the poet, nascitur non fit. His birth status is unalterable. But with the Sikh the exact reverse is the case. Born of a Sikh father, he is not himself counted of the faith until, as a grown boy, he has been initiated and received the baptism of the pahul at the Akal Bungah or some equally sacred place.”
Lepel H. Griffin, Ranjit Singh

Rohinton Mistry
“The pavement artist thought for a bit, then agreed. 'I can start tomorrow morning.'

'Good, good. But one question. Will you be able to draw enough to cover 300 feet? I mean, do you know enough different gods to fill the whole wall?'

The artist smiled. 'There is no difficulty. I can cover 300 miles if necessary. Using assorted religions and their gods, saints, and prophets. Hindu, Sikh, Judaic, Christian, Muslim, Zoroastrian, Buddhist, Jainist. Actually, Hinduism alone can produce enough. But I always like to mix them up, include a variety in my drawings. Makes me feel I am doing something to promote tolerance and understanding in the world.”
Rohinton Mistry, Such a Long Journey

“Vaheguru, forgive me, but a woman must choose the wisdom of lies over the dangers of truth.”
Shauna Singh Baldwin, What the Body Remembers

Abhijit Naskar
“My Sikh sisters and brothers proclaim with utter glory and faith “Jo Bole So Nihaal, Sat Sri Akaal”, I say ”Jo Anubhava So Nihaal, Sat Sri Akaal”. My translation of the former is “He who utters ‘Great Eternal Truth’ becomes joyous”, while the latter translates to “He who experiences ‘Great Eternal Truth’ becomes joyous”.”
Abhijit Naskar, Neurons, Oxygen & Nanak

Abhijit Naskar
“Nanak wanted to preach people that God loves both the Hindus and the Muslims the same way. Believing in his spiritual encounter, he wanted to eliminate the distance between the Hindus and the Muslims by teaching the words of equality and One God. But just like usual, he ended up forming yet another religion which became more and more hardcore with its own rituals and regulations in the hands of the subsequent nine Gurus.”
Abhijit Naskar, The God Parasite: Revelation of Neuroscience

“She leans over Roop the way Sardarji leaned over Satya the years she cried for children, brushing tears from Roop's heavy lashes with her lips. She strokes her head as a mother would, says. "Slpee little one, we are together now."
And Roop sleeps, overcome by the afternoon heat.
While Satya watches her.
So trusting, so very stupid.”
Shauna Singh Baldwin, What the Body Remembers

Abhijit Naskar
“The entire Granth Sahib, which is the central scripture of Sikhism, is basically an elaboration of the Mool Mantar.”
Abhijit Naskar, Neurons, Oxygen & Nanak

Abhijit Naskar
“Sikhism emerged as a ray of hope for the people of India who were stuck in obscurity – who craved for a way out from the rigorous battle between Hindu and Muslim orthodoxy.”
Abhijit Naskar, Neurons, Oxygen & Nanak

Abhijit Naskar
“All these stories of Janamsakhi were like an artistic instrument that was yielded more to spread Nanak’s spiritual sovereignty as a mystical prophet than as an effective teacher in flesh and blood. In the midst of ignorance and mystical craving, they provided a simple method to guide people, or rather allure them to a newly formed religious path by sermonizing through stories of mystical non-sense.”
Abhijit Naskar, Neurons, Oxygen & Nanak

Abhijit Naskar
“All of his (Nanak's) progressive thinking attained absolution at the age of 30, when he had the transcendental experience, quite similar to that of Mohammed and Joan of Arc, that was about to rock the very foundation of orthodox Hinduism in India.”
Abhijit Naskar, Neurons, Oxygen & Nanak

Abhijit Naskar
“Nanak’s encounter of God and God’s court was in fact a profound hallucinatory Near-Death Experience caused by drowning that strengthened his pre-conceived notion of a rational, compassionate and unorthodox society.”
Abhijit Naskar, Neurons, Oxygen & Nanak

Abhijit Naskar
“One of these individuals, whose apparently divine subjective experience of transcendence led to the birth of one of the relatively modern religions of planet earth, was a man named Nanak. In an effort to diminish the contemporary conflicts between the Hindus and the Muslims, he ended up becoming the founding patriarch of yet another circle of religious ideologies – Sikhism – a child religion born from the wedlock between Hinduism and Islam.”
Abhijit Naskar, Neurons, Oxygen & Nanak

Sathnam Sanghera
“Like so many interactions in the Sikh community, the encounter will end in a kind of wrestling match, with one person trying to thrust money on the other, the other refusing to accept, and both people ending up offended and possibly physically bruised by the other's persistence.”
Sathnam Sanghera, The Boy with the Topknot: A Memoir of Love, Secrets and Lies in Wolverhampton