Self Interest Quotes

Quotes tagged as "self-interest" Showing 1-30 of 75
Charlaine Harris
“If I have to choose between you and me - I like me better.”
Charlaine Harris

Michael Bassey Johnson
“Stay away from lazy parasites, who perch on you just to satisfy their needs, they do not come to alleviate your burdens, hence, their mission is to distract, detract and extract, and make you live in abject poverty.”
Michael Bassey Johnson

Criss Jami
“I'm convinced that most men don't know what they believe, rather, they only know what they wish to believe. How many people blame God for man's atrocities, but wouldn't dream of imprisoning a mother for her son's crime?”
Criss Jami, Killosophy

Octavia E. Butler
“Beware:
At war
Or at peace,
More people die
Of unenlightened self-interest
Than of any other disease.”
Octavia Butler, Parable of the Talents

Aristophanes
“Look at the orators in our republics; as long as they are poor, both state and people can only praise their uprightness; but once they are fattened on the public funds, they conceive a hatred for justice, plan intrigues against the people and attack the democracy.”
Aristophanes, Plutus

Michael Bassey Johnson
“Just because you have stolen someone's heart, luckily owned and occupied as a home, doesn't give you the audacity to enforce hurtful policies.”
Michael Bassey Johnson

Bernard of Clairvaux
“Neither fear nor self-interest can convert the soul. They may change the appearance, perhaps even the conduct, but never the object of supreme desire... Fear is the motive which constrains the slave; greed binds the selfish man, by which he is tempted when he is drawn away by his own lust and enticed (James 1:14). But neither fear nor self-interest is undefiled, nor can they convert the soul. Only charity can convert the soul, freeing it from unworthy motives.”
St. Bernard of Clairvaux

“Courage is a decision you make to act in a way that works through your own fear for the greater good as opposed to pure self-interest. Courage means putting at risk your immediate self-interest for what you believe is right.”
Derrick Bell, Ethical Ambition: Living a Life of Meaning and Worth

“Happiness is attained, not through self-interest, but through unconditional fidelity in endless love of eternal light.”
Aaron Cohen

Orson Scott Card
“In a way she actually preferred Peter to other people because of this. He always acted out of intelligent self-interest.”
Orson Scott Card, Ender's Game

Angelica Hopes
“A true generous heart can never revolve majorly with monetary skills nor business acumen nor cunning mind.”
Angelica Hopes

Ann Coulter
“Democrats see our voluntary military supported by taxpayer dollars as their personal Salvation Army. Self-interested behavior, such as deploying troops to serve the nation, is considered boorish in Manhattan salons.”
Ann Coulter

“If you can’t see beyond your own interest, you can’t be a leader. Leaders need to rise above self.”
Krishna Saagar Rao

Cliff  James
“I begin to see how a post-money society would work in practice. When we are in paid employment, we are exchanging our labour in return for money in order to live within a money-based society, nothing more. Both sides in the labour-salary exchange are motivated by self-interest. But when we volunteer our labour for a cause, for a better world, we are not so much exchanging our labour as investing it directly into the world we want to see. Notes for Utopia: there will be no money when we get there.”
Cliff James, Life As A Kite

Simon R. Green
“The past is what we make of it, if we know what's is good for us.”
Simon R. Green, Drinking Midnight Wine

“It is not conscience, but self-interest, that makes cowards of us all.”
Marty Rubin

“Humanity progresses because of attempts to serve. and the more you serve others, the more you're serving yourself.”
Aniekee Tochukwu Ezekiel

Ashim Shanker
“We had found a more binding union than could be afforded us through mere Particle Egalitarianism. Now, we were all residents of the Accursed Lands.”
Ashim Shanker, Inward and Toward

Cliff  James
“I belin to see how a post-money society would work in practice. When we are in paid employment, we are exchanging our labour in return for money in order to live within a money-based society, nothing more. Both sides in the labour-salary exchange are motivated by self-interest. But when we volunteer our labour for a cause, for a better world, we are not so much exchanging our labour as investing it directly into the world we want to see. Notes for Utopia: there will be no money when we get there.”
Cliff James, Life As A Kite

Salman Ahmed Shaikh
“After the lockdown, when markets become less active, the subject of mainstream economics faces another tough ground. There are millions of poor people who do not have work. When lockdown happens, a great many people find resource markets stalled where they used to get income. More than ever, such crises necessitate the flow of resources from the haves to the have-nots. But, frozen goods and resource markets cannot help much, especially the poor and vulnerable people. That is where, pro-social behaviour and beyond-market distribution of resources is necessary. However, mainstream economics treats altruism as ‘impure’. It looks at altruism in the paradigm of pursuing self-interest.”
Salman Ahmed Shaikh, Reflections on the Origins in the Post COVID-19 World

Salman Ahmed Shaikh
“The paradigm of self-interest is neutral between a person’s decision to help others or to not help others. If fear and uncertainty make people more short-sighted, self-centric and engage in hoarding cash, withdrawing from banks, disinvesting their savings in capital markets and buying essential goods in bulk, then there is no drive, urge or impetus that economics can offer to suggest otherwise. It is neutral between these choices and the choice for altruism.

On the other hand, as per physics, we were stardust before and stardust after extinction. As per evolutionary biology, we are one of the millions and millions of species that have earned the right to survive under the sun for a brief period until genetic mutations bury our specie as well. We were born through a fierce and destructive competition and survive until we manage to withstand that competition. While waiting and acting on morals, we should not be here in the first place.”
Salman Ahmed Shaikh, Reflections on the Origins in the Post COVID-19 World

Salman Ahmed Shaikh
“Motivation for moral behaviour and pro-social cooperative response has to come from somewhere else. In poor countries like Pakistan, people with surplus resources are engaging in charity, donations, and volunteering. Empirical evidence in Pakistan in multiple research studies has found that faith is the biggest motivation behind charitable donations and it encapsulates and is associated with other humane motives. This trend is also seen in other parts of the world. But, economics is largely silent and irrelevant when it comes to exchange, allocation and distribution of economic resources outside of markets.”
Salman Ahmed Shaikh, Reflections on the Origins in the Post COVID-19 World

Salman Ahmed Shaikh
“Self-centrism creates another problem on the response side. The problem with commercially motivated technological change is that if it does not make good business, the idea does not see its growth. Sanitation and clean water is still a problem in localities where everyone has 4G connection and mobile wallet accounts. Commercially motivated research is more intensely pursued than socially urgent ones. Technological improvements to ease sanitation, bring clean water and achieve recycling are given less attention than telecommunication and digital financial services which are commercially more profitable ventures.”
Salman Ahmed Shaikh, Reflections on the Origins in the Post COVID-19 World

Salman Ahmed Shaikh
“Education geared to industry demands has also got into the trap of producing commercial technologists for corporations. These corporations are not built for social responsibility in free-market capitalism. Milton Friedman said the biggest and only responsibility of a corporation is to increase shareholders’ wealth. If these corporations do research and find a vaccine eventually that costs $1,000, then those who are not able to afford it would be regarded by mainstream economists as having less willingness to pay. For the poor, it is not a choice, but a helpless situation. But, poor having less budget for essential needs is a problem that we do not start our economics textbooks with.”
Salman Ahmed Shaikh, Reflections on the Origins in the Post COVID-19 World

Salman Ahmed Shaikh
“In basic microeconomics textbooks, even when welfare gets attention, it is in the domain of efficient outcomes. Redistribution through taxes is first introduced as a big ‘no go’ domain with concepts of deadweight loss.

However, inefficiency out of market behaviour and market outcomes is plainly ignored and overlooked. Approximately, $600 million daily is needed to feed every extremely poor person, yet about $2.75 billion value of food is wasted every day, according to Food and Agriculture Organization. Consequently, 9 million people die every year from hunger while one-third of all food is wasted. This gross inefficiency in economic resources is not captured or discussed. According to Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, globally, per capita food supply increased from about 2,200 kcal per day in the early 1960s to more than 2,903 kcal per day by 2014. But under capitalism, the market allocates goods including even food to only those who can pay its price. It does not make a difference whether the willingness to pay is less than the price due to ‘preference’ or due to ‘poverty’. Yet, mainstream economics claims consumer sovereignty.”
Salman Ahmed Shaikh, Reflections on the Origins in the Post COVID-19 World

Salman Ahmed Shaikh
“In the earlier era, the subject of economics was geared to human needs. Now, the prime emphasis is on market behaviour and market outcomes based on choices under uncertainty and scarcity. The emphasis on choice behaviour subtly and inadvertently makes economics and most of its contents largely irrelevant for poor people.”
Salman Ahmed Shaikh, Reflections on the Origins in the Post COVID-19 World

Mwanandeke Kindembo
“It is almost impossible to become a pious person, without having any self-interest left
within you.”
Mwanandeke Kindembo, Resistance To Intolerance

Eleanor Davis
“Darling, I’ve realised I don’t love you.



If I loved anyone, it would be you. But I love no one. 



I’ve come to understand I don’t care about anything except for myself.

Any kindness I’ve ever shown has been in my own self-interest.

The very existence of other people seems doubtful.

I wanted more from life than this.

Let’s have a baby.”
Eleanor Davis, How To Be Happy

Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“It takes selfishness to stop someone from killing themself.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana, P for Pessimism: A Collection of Funny yet Profound Aphorisms

Kurt Vonnegut Jr.
“About the dumb Earthlings versus the smart Earthlings: I have known a fair number of scientists over the years, and I noticed they were often as bored by each other’s work as dumb people would be.”
Kurt Vonnegut Jr., Wampeters, Foma and Granfalloons

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