Mortgage Quotes

Quotes tagged as "mortgage" (showing 1-18 of 18)
Douglas Rushkoff
“Mortgages were less about getting people into property than getting them into debt. Someone had to absorb the surplus supply of credit.”
Douglas Rushkoff, Life Inc.: How the World Became a Corporation and How to Take it Back

Csaba Gabor-B.
“ My grandfather used to say ‘It is my house I am paying the bills’,
my dad used to say ‘this is my house I pay the mortgage’,
my generation is saying this is my house I pay the rent.”
Csaba Gabor-B.

Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“In many cases, it was the woman’s stomach—not her heart—that fell for her man.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana, The Selfish Genie: A Satirical Essay on Altruism

Douglas Rushkoff
“Step by step, place became property, property became a mortgage, and
mortgages became derivative investments.”
Douglas Rushkoff, Life Inc.: How the World Became a Corporation and How to Take it Back

Douglas Rushkoff
“We were taking out mortgages we couldn’t afford because they were camouflaged to look as if we had a reasonable chance of paying them back. Banks then changed the bankruptcy laws so that we could not get out of our obligations once the rates changed. Lastly, they sold us back our own mortgages, shifting back to us any of the risk through our money-market accounts and pension funds.”
Douglas Rushkoff, Life Inc.: How the World Became a Corporation and How to Take it Back

Marvin H. McIntyre
“My only allegiance is to my country.  The success of our country is built on hard work, sacrifice, innovation, integrity, and confidence.  How can you be confident if you can’t get a job?  How can you be confident if the mortgage on your home is higher than your home’s value?  How can you be confident when our elected officials haven’t given us one single idea how to fix this situation? – Jeremy Lyons”
Marvin H. McIntyre

Calvin Trillin
“among married couples the person who actually makes out the mortgage check is likely to be more cautious about spending money than the person who doesn't. There is something sobering about sending away that much money every month in the knowledge that, rain or shine, you'll have to come up with the same amount of money the next month and the month after that.”
Calvin Trillin, About Alice

Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“In some cases, it is the woman’s stomach—not her heart—that has left her man for another.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana, The Selfish Genie: A Satirical Essay on Altruism

“Stop being chained down by bad credit I have the key to set you free...”
Tyler Gregory

Douglas Rushkoff
“Engaged in a new form of serfdom---only bound now to banks and mortgage lenders instead of to lords---her more highly leveraged neighbors pore over the business section of the newspaper each day looking for some sign that the government will soon step in to “freeze” their mortgage rates where they are before a scheduled adjustment hits.”
Douglas Rushkoff, Life Inc.: How the World Became a Corporation and How to Take it Back

“To work for salary is to mortgage your life.”
Sunday Adelaja, How To Become Great Through Time Conversion: Are you wasting time, spending time or investing time?

Ta-Nehisi Coates
“From the 1930s through the 1960s, black people across the country were largely cut out of the legitimate home-mortgage market through means both legal and extralegal. Chicago whites employed every measure, from 'restrictive covenants' to bombings, to keep their neighborhoods segregated.”
Ta-Nehisi Coates

Ta-Nehisi Coates
“The American real-estate industry believed segregation to be a moral principle. As late as 1950, the National Association of Real Estate Boards' code of ethics warned that "a Realtor should never be instrumental in introducing into a neighborhood ... any race or nationality, or any individuals whose presence will clearly be detrimental to property values." A 1943 brochure specified that such potential undesireables might include madams, bootleggers, gangsters - and "a colored man of means who was giving his children a college education and thought they were entitled to live among whites."

The federal government concurred. It was the How Owners' Loan Corporation, not a private trade association, that pioneered the practice of redlining, selectively granting loans and insisting that any property it insured be covered by a restrictive covenant - a clause in the deed forbidding the sale of the property to anyone other than whites. Millions of dollars flowed from tax coffers into segregated white neighborhoods.

"For perhaps the first time, the federal government embraced the discriminatory attitudes of the marketplace," the historian Kenneth R. Jackson wrote in his 1985 book, Crabgrass Frontier, a history of suburbanization. "Previously, prejudices were personalized and individualized; FHA exhorted segregation and enshrined it as public policy. Whole areas of cities were declared ineligible for loan guarantees." Redlining was not officially outlawed until 1968, by the Fair Housing Act. By then the damage was done - and reports of redlining by banks have continued.”
Ta-Nehisi Coates, The Case for Reparations

Amanda Craig
“It’s unthinkable, now to live as her parents had done, going to work from nine to five and enjoying the benefits of the newly-formed health and education services. What paradise it had seemed! Now, in order to pay their exorbitant mortgages, and ever more exorbitant fuel prices, British adults have to work long hours – the longest, it is said, in Europe… Everyone they know, everyone they see, is just like them, living in houses like these, reading the same papers, seeing the same films and TV programmes and plays, buying from the same shops and sending their children to the same schools; and they think it will go on for ever, either ever-mounting property prices cushioning them. But it can’t.”
Amanda Craig

Ta-Nehisi Coates
“In Chicago and across the country, whites looking to achieve the American dream could rely on a legitimate credit system backed by the government. Blacks were herded into the sights of unscrupulous lenders who took them for money and for sport.”
Ta-Nehisi Coates, The Case for Reparations

Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“Some people will each start investing more of their salary on ‘their’ house and spending less of it on ‘their’ car or cars only when they start being able to take ‘their’ house to work, funerals, weddings, etc.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana

Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“One of the most common root causes of our unhappiness is our desire to give people who will get to see the house we live in, and/or the car or cars we drive, an idea of how much we earn, earned, or were allowed to borrow.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana

Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“It is even more foolish to buy an unnecessary thing on credit.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana